(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Quincy Sun July - Dec 1999"

Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper 





Quincy 



/ 



MA 



JULY 




DECEMBER 



1999 



/ 



£iW?"J*"¥*''"^ 



■WPwrtm 



■s«>/ 



MICROFILMED 2000 
FILMED BY: 




New England 

Micrographics, inc. 



344 Boston Post Road, Marlboro, MA 01752 

1-800-433-4065 



^o\ 




'» 



1- 



^, Ml >»'■ 




^ 




:?=5<,, 



% 



% 



o„ NT/ 



-^- %. 



""O 





^s, 



% 








/ 




% 



'O. 



'<^ 



A 



.<;^ 



^ <^ 



<. ». 






#/. 



[^'^ 



C^- 



.<^/ 



A 




M.CROCOPy RESOLUTION TEST CHART 

ANSI and ISO TEST CHART No 2, 



1.0 



u 



I 45 



1.25 



m 2.8 



13.2 






u 



Z5 

zo 

1.8 



1.6 



^, 



















^ APPLIED JIVHGE Inc 



14X 



I 




%. 



x'-O -^ O "-i , 






o f* / ^^^ 



/o^ 







j? 



o 



(? 






Ci 






*" 



V 






^-. 



«««««««««»»««««««S-OIGn 02269 
THOMAS CWW PUBLIC LIBRARY 
PO BOX 379 
QUIHCY MA 02269 






Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper 




VOL. 31 No. 40 



Thursday. July 1, 1999 



2 Sections - 64 Pages 



NEWS 

INSIDE 



What's On Tap 

For The 'Fourth' 

^ Page 2 

▼ 
Decision Awaited 

On Raytheon 

Plant's Fate 

~ Page 3 

▼ 
Couple $1 ,000 

Richer Thanks 

To Recycling 

— Page 1 1 

▼ 
Shaw's Going In 

North Quincy, 

Victory Coming 

~ Page 12 

T 
For Fr. William 

Mullin, It's Like 

Coming Home 

— Page 13 

▼ 
A Perfect Game 

For Chris Ham 

— Page 19 

▼ 
$75,000 Voted 

To Preserve 

City Records 

— Page 19 

▼ 
4 New Restaurants 

Move 

Toward Opening 

~ Page 28 



Weather 
Forecast 



*=■<:? 



i ^ 




Council Cuts Only $2,000 



Budget $165 Million, More Needed 




By MARILYN JACKSON 

The city council unanimously approved a 
$165.58 million budget for fiscal year 2000, $7.3 
million higher than last year, but that won't be 
the bottom line. 



Questioned by Council- 
lor-at-large Frank 
McCauIey, School Super- 
intendent Eugene Creedon 
and George Umscheid, di- 
rector of business, said that 
the contractual agreements 
with the Quincy Education 
Association will require 
separate appropriations. 

Mayor James Sheets had 
included $1.4 million in the 
school budget to cover the 
balance of the unpaid 1999 
teacher salaries as well as a 



from $1.6 million in free 
cash and a one-time pay- 
ment of $272,000 as a result 
of deregulation of electric 
industry. 

In addition, the council- 
lors transferred the 
$405,206 in free cash and 
$2.9 million in reserves to 
the stabilization fund. A 
sum of $2.25 million was 
earmarked for hospital 
costs. 

The councillors also re- 
stored two budget cuts they 



percentage increase for the had previously approved. 



year 2000. Because the ne 
gotiated percentage increase 
agreed upon was higher. 
Sheets said he will have to 
submit an appropriation to 



Council President Peter 
Kolson, who serves as 
chairman of the city's mil- 
lennium committee, sug- 
gested restoring the $50,000 



the city council in Septem- in funds for the city's cele- 
ber for between $800,000 to brations. 



THE UNCLE SAM cake is being featured by Roche Brothers for the Fourth of July. Quhicy's 
Unde Sam Rouoseville is shown here with one of the caiics with his photo scanned into it and 
the words "AMERICA, You're The Greatest" The photo on the calce is by Harry Brett, 
Image Photo of Quincy, as is tliis one. 

Corrections Center 
Partially Opened 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

The new community cor- 
rections center at 14 Revere 
Road is partially open for 
business, a spokesman for 
Norfolk County Sheriff Mi- 
chael Bellotti conHrmed this 
week. 

During the winter and 
early spring, inmates from 
the Dedham House of Cor- 
rection renovated the yellow 
brick building. Last year, 
Bellotti's predecessor, John 
Flood, had secured a 
$700,000 grant to establish 
the facility which, when 
fiilly operational, will serve 



between 100 and 200 non- 
violent offenders. 

James Harder, public 
information director for 
Bellotti's office, said the 
building was being opened 
in stages to make sure the 
facility is functioning ap- 
propriately. 

The first component of 
the new center is to provide 
urine testing for those indi- 
viduals who are on proba- 
tion and require drug 
screening. He said the Wil- 
low Street Medical Center,! 
state-certified agency, is 
conducting the testing. 



The biggest component 
of the community correc- 
tions program will be the 
resources to be offered to 
probationers. 

Bellotti is reviewing 
three proposals from poten- 
tial vendors to offer GEE>s 
(general education diplo- 
mas), job development and 
alcohol and substance abuse 
programs. He expects to 
make a recommendation to 
the county commissioners 
within the near future, said 
Harder. 

More supervised proba- 

(Cont 'd on page 25) 



$1 million. 

"The $1.4 million won't 
be enough," said Umscheid. 

"We haven't cost it out," 
Sheets said Tuesday. 

The school department's 
budget, as presented, of 
$53.27 million — an in- 
crease of slightly more than 
5 percent or $2.6 million — 
was approved by the city 
councillors with little de- 
bate. 

In other financial mat- 
ters, the councillors appro- 
priated $1.9 million for hos- 
pital and city expenses in- 
curred during fiscal year 
1999. Auditor Robert Foy 



After the mayor had 
agreed to include $500,000 
in the city's budget for 
sidewalk repairs, Kolson 
said there was no longer a 
need for the cut. 

"If we put back the 
$50,000 and the $57,000 for 
the trenches, we will have 
cut $2,000 after three 
meeting nights," said Coun- 
cillor-t-large Paul Harold. 

"That's not my idea of 
legislative deliberations," he 
said. "I would have written 
a check for $2,000 and 
stayed home." 

Harold suggested that the 
celebrations line item was 



said that the hospital's FICA an appropriate place to ask 

expenses, along with unem- the businesses to contribute, 

ployment, workman's com- McCauley added that the 

pensation and stop loss in- city has been good to busi 



surance normally would 
have been paid by hospital 
revenues which are not 
there. 

The appropriation came 



ness and perhaps business 
should "pony up more." 

Councillor-at-large 
Timothy Cahill said the 
(Cont'd On Page 28} 



Neighbors Complain Of Early Morning Hours 

Board Cracks Down On Junk Yard 



By MARIE D'OUMPIO 

"Nobody wants to live 
near a junk yard" said 
License Board chairman 
Joseph Shea at the start of 
Tuesday's meeting re- 
garding complaints about 
Sugarman's Junk Yard on 
Centre St. 

He added he was 
"acutely aware of the most 
recent concerns of 
neighbors who said David 
Sugarman was conducting 
his business in the wee 



hours of Sunday. 

Sugarman was given a 
warning that he would 
have to comply with the 
city ordinance and not 
open before 7 a.m. barring 
a "national disaster". 

Police Chief Thomas 
Frane also said "under no 
circumstances" can Sugar- 
man operate his business 
in the early hours and 
would have to restrict 
noises and operation of 
machinery before 7 a.m. 



Following complaints 
from neighbors about the 
dust and noise and the 
operation of the yard 
beginning soinetimes at 1 
a.m. on a Sunday Frane 
told the abutters to contact 
the police department if 
Sugarman does not abide 
by the rules set by the 
board. 

He added that in the 
event that any violation is 
brought to the police 
department's attention, 



"stronger action" will be 
taken. 

Norman Goyette, an 
aide to Ward 4 Councillor 
Michael D'Amico said the 
councillor wants to attain 
a "people friendly at- 
mosphere", but wanted 
Sugarman to promise he 

would "abide by city 
rules". Sugarman said he 
had ncM met with D'Amico, 
but was promised by 

(Cont'd pH page 25) 



Historic Quincy 
Supplement Inside 

Early News Deadline 
For Next Week's Sun 



Because of Indepen- 
dence Day being observed 
on Monday, July 5 there 
will be an early news dead- 
hat for next week's Quincy 
Sun. 

Community news, 
churdi and ^x>rts releases. 



retail and legal advertising 
should be in The Sun of- 
fice, 1372 Hancock St, by 
tomorrow (Friday) noon 
for publication in next 
week's Sun. 

Thank you for your co- 
(^ration. 



^■♦■■» *.> 



Page 2 Tixm Qulnoy BuA Tii|inday, July 1; 1999 



ff 



Liquor Store Next 

To Roche Brothers 
Gets Board's Go- Ahead 





Community <jg 
Celebrations 



By MARIE D'OLIMPIO 

The License Board 
voted unanimously Tues- 
day for the transfer of the 
retail all alcoholic pack- 
age store license formerly 
held by Mary G. Gaquin, 
to Flynn Liquor, Inc. who 
will open at Roche Bros. 
Supermarket building on 
101 Falls Blvd. 

The liquor store will be 
next door to Roche Bros, 
and will be separated from 
the supermarket by a solid 
interior wall. The store will 
be accessible only through 
a separate entrance from 
the sidewalk adjacent to 
the main parking area and 
through a separate rear 
delivery door. 

Chairman Joseph Shea 
said Roche Bros had 
requested the license three 
years ago, but it was 
defeated by a 4-1 vote and 



had at the time many 
abutters. He noted that 
Tuesday, there were no 
abutters 

He added that the 
"great supermarket chase 
for liquor licenses is over" 
and said with the issuing 
of liquor licenses to 
Shaw's and Stop & Shop, 
he "supported this request" 
because he said he "felt 
bad when the other 
markets got it" .. 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman expressed con- 
cerns over cars parking in 
front of the liquor store 
because of designated 
parking for Roche Bros, 
and utilities, such as a 
sprinkler system in the 
liquor store. He said they 
would have to be defined 
and separated from the 
supermarket. 



Atty. Dennis Harrington, 
representing Flynn said 
parking was arranged and 
that they would abide by 
the rules and parking 
spaces set by Roche Bros. 

Flynn, who lives in 
Bridgewater, is also the 
owner of Stephen's Liquor 
Mart in Waltham and 
Raynham Wine & Liquor 
in Raynham. He will 
manage the Quincy store 

The store, which will 
have 6,000 square feet of 
floor space will open in a 
couple of months. 

Mary Gaquin, who sold 
her liquor license to Flynn, 
owns The Yacht Shop at 
542 East Squantum St. 

The City of Quincy has 
one other package store 
license, held by Dollar 
Savers on Quincy Shore 
Blvd. They are looking for 
another site. 



LicKNSK Board Briki s 



The License Board took 
the following action at 
Tuesday's meeting. 

•Granted a one day 
permit to St. John's Church 
to hold a parish cookout 
Sunday, Aug. 15 from 12 
noon to 4 p.m. 

•Allowed a change of 
managers at Paddy 
Barry's, (former Sportlight 
Tavern) 1574 Hancock St. 
from Theresa Queally to 
Diane Hill. 

•Granted a common 
victualer license to Paul 
Cifrino, owner of The 
Supreme Pantry, 615 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773-4600 



WED&THURS JUNE 30 & JULY 1 

Kate Capshaw ■ Tom SeKeck 
THE LOVE LEHER' (PG-13) 

Adun Comedy 
EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 2 

Brendan Fraser ■ Rachel Weisz 

'THE MUMMY' (PG-13) 

Adult Sci-Fi 

FRI & SAT 6:55 & 9:20 

SUN - THURS 7:00 ONLY 

urnnrnwanmrr 



ALL SfATS 3 SO 



Hancock St. for a 
convenience store, 
(formerly Wollaston Mar- 
ket). 

•Granted a common 
victualer license to 
Richard Nicholson, owner 
of Epicurean Feast Cafes, 
100 Newport Ave. 
Extension for a food 
cafeteria at the Blue 
Cross, Blue Shield 
building. 

•Granted permission to 
Sylvia Jones, owner of the 
Hancock Convenience, 
1504 Hancock St. to 
change the name to 

Juliano's. 

•Granted permission to 
Quincy Avenue Global, 
451 Quincy Ave. to store 
19,400 gallons of gasoline 
underground and 300 
above ground. Also a 
change of ownership from 
Audi, In. to Fadi H. Hanna. 

•Granted an extension 
of premises of the liquor 
and entertainment licenses 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



of Shooters Club Cafe, 58 
Ross Way or use outdoors 
during the "29th Annual;l 
Summer Festival" July 
15,16, and 17. 

•Granted a Old Gold 
and Silver License and 
Pawnbroker License to 
Ronald Van Dam who will 
operate the Golden Pawn, 
279 Willard St. (former 

Tile Store). Permission 
was granted pending a 
neighborhood meeting with 
Ward 4 Councillor 
Michael D'Amico. 

•Granted a common 
victualer license to 
Sammy Mui, owner of 
Crown Royal Bakery, 299 
Newport Ave. (former 
Bean Routine). 

•Continued a hearing 
from Mandarin King, 656 
Washington St. for a wine 
and male license. Fire 
Chief Thomas Gorman 
said because of ongoing 
litigation concerning the 
Point Pub, they will 
submit the request to the 
law department. The 
hearing will take place at 
the next meeting on July 
20. 



The following is a list of Quincy organizations holding Fourth 
of July events Saturday, Sunday and Monday: 
Adams Natioiial Historic Site 
Fourth of Julv: Independe nce Forever! Public invited to play a 
part in one of the nation's greatest dramas, the passage of the Dec- 
laration of Independence. Adams National Historical Site, Sun- 
day, July 4, Carriage House, 135 Adams St., Quincy. 11 a.m to 2 
p.m.; 2 - 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Call (617) 770-1175 for more 
information and reservations. Free. 

NEIGHBORHO OD ACnVlTIES 
Adams Shore Community Association, O'Hani Cirde. 
Sunday. Julv 4. noon to 5 p.m. Block party/cookout, DJ, games 
- O'Hara Circle. 

Monday. Julv 5. 9 a.m. flag raising and bicycle/doll carriage 
parade, scholarship and award presentation, O'Hara Circle. 
Baker Beach Association 
Sunday. Julv 4: Cleanup. 

Monday. July 5: 9 a.m., doll carriage & bicycle parades, races, 
entertainment, food. 

Squantum Community Association 
Saturday. July 3: 5:45 p.m. race; 6 p.m. cookout, doll carriage 
and bicycle parades, magician, DJ, "Miss Merrymount" contest, 
egg toss, pie eating events. 

Sunday, July 4: 9 a.m. Field Day, Merrymount School; 1-2 
p.m. parade, Merrymount School to Merrymount Beach. 
Ward 2 Civic Association, Fore River Clubhouse/Field 
Saturday. Julv 3: 6 to 8:30 p.m., band concert. 
Monday. Julv 5: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.. Fourth of July Field Day 
including races, food, doll carriage, bicycle and "horribles" pa- 
rade, award ceremony following parade. 



i 



Health 
Water 



Department Begins 
Sampling Program 



Quincy Health Depart- 
ment has commenced its 
summer water sampling 
program. 

Water samples will be 
collected every Monday 
now through Aug. 30, at 10 
beaches, one to two hours 
before high tide. Results 
will be analyzed for fecal 
coliform counts by a certi- 
fied private laboratory, and 
will be made available to 
media throughout the sum- 
mer. 

The MDC will collect 
and analyze water samples 
at four locations along 
Wollaston Beach. Sample 
results will be reported to 
beach managers and the 
Quincy Health Department 
by Friday of each week. 

Quincy will utilize a 
standard of 200 or greater 
fecal coliform colonies as an 
indication of potential 
health risk. Beaches with 



counts of 200 or greater will 
be resampled and posted 
with signs which read: 

"Warning - Beach Un- 
acceptable for Swimming 
per order of Quincy Health 
Dept." 

Such beaches are consid- 
ered unsafe for swimming 
and the signs will remain in 
place until water samples 
show fecal coliform counts 
below 200. 

If a period of rainfall 
occurs after water samples 
are taken each Monday, 
such samples may not repre- 
sent an accurate reflection 
of the water quality which 
will be reported on Fridays. 
Sewerage can be discharged 
into the harbor from pipes 
and drains that contain over- 
flow wastewater in combi- 
nation with rainwater after 
1/4 of an inch of rainfall or 
greater occurs in a given 
day. 



The health department 
recommends that people 
from refrain from swim- 
ming or bathing for a period 
of 48 hours after a rainfall to 
allow for the natural flush- 
ing action of the tides to 
dilute and cleanse the water. 

The city has been in- 
volved in a bathing water 
quality improvement pro- 
gram over the past several 
years. The program detects 
and repairs problems within 
sewer and storm drain pipes 
which adversely affect 
Quincy Bay. The program, 
administered by the Quincy 
Public Works Department, 
continues today with ongo- 
ing, routine maintenance 
practices such as street 
sweeping, drain cleaning 
and tide gate inspections. 

For a bathing beach wa- 
ter sampling program bro- 
chure, or more information, 
call 376-1278. 



1 



SxJunmeHfe^l 

June 30th-September 1st 
Every Wednesday 7-9pm* 




*Rain dates 
Thursdays 



Ruth Gordon Amphitheater 



Tbunday, July 1,1999 Tl»« Qulacgr Sub Pacr3 



("^ . 




♦WE'RE GOING TO fight to keep the plant open," Senator 
Ted Kennedy toM workers from the Qiiincy Raytheon plant 
at a rally Friday outside City Hall. Management has 
indicated it might close the plant. Among those ringed 
behind Kennedy tram the left, are City Councillors Paul 
Harold and Frank McCauley, U.S. Commerce Secretary 



William Daley, former Councillor Michael Cheney, U.S. 
Transportatton Secretary Rodney Slater, IBEW Local 1505 
President Stanley Lichwala and Mayor James Sheets 
flanked by Raytheon cmptoyecs Gloria McCall and Rose 
Marie Hayden. 



CONGRESSMAN WILLIAM DELAHUNT toW the crowd 
of about 250 at the rally 'Hhere is no valid reason to dose the 
phmt" and promised his support to keep it open. 

(Quincy Sun PhotoslRobert Noble) 



Political Leaders Rally Behind Workers 

Decision Awaited On Raytheon Plant's Fate 



The fate of Raytheon's 
Quincy plant appeared still 
uncertain Tuesday with the 
jobs of an estimated 600 
employees at stake. 

A decision on whether to 
close the South Quincy 
electronics producing facil- 
ity or keep it open was still 
awaited from company offi- 
cials. 

The workers and mem- 
bers of the International 



Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers Local 1505 had a 
lot of political thump on 
their side at a rally Friday 
outside City Hall. 

"We're going to fight to 
keep the plant open and 
keep these important jobs 
right here where they be- 
long," Senator Edward 
Kennedy told a cheering 
crowd of about 250 workers 
and union members. 



"The 600 jobs at this 
plant are vital to our na- 
tional defense and vital to 
Quincy. We're proud of 
you. No one does it better 
than all of you and I'll con- 
tinue to everything possible 
to save these jobs." 

Congressman William 
Delahunt of Quincy' de- 
clared: "There is no valid 
reason to close the plant in 
Quincy. 



"Let us know," he urged 
company officials, "what 
you want to build, what you 
want to design, what you 
want to manufacture be- 
cause we can do it here in 
Quincy." 

He asked company offi- 
cials to sit down and discuss 
the matter with union lead- 
ers. 

Also lending their sup- 
port were U.S. Commerce 



Secretary William Daley 
and U.S. Transportation 
Secretary Rodney Slater. 

Mayor James Sheets, 
hosted the rally with City 
Council President Peter 
Kolson and both vowed to 
do all they could to keep the 
plant open. 

Other political figures 
attending the rally included 
state Senator Michael Mor- 



rissey, City Councillors Paul 
Harold, Frank McCauley 
and Patrick McDermott and 
former Councillor Michael 
Cheney. 

Officials of Local 1505 
which represents about 
3,300 Raytheon workers in 
Massachusetts say they 
want a definite answer on 
whether the Quincy plant is 
closinjs. And, if so, they 

{Cont'd on page 24) 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS vowed to do aU he couid to keep the Raytheon Quincy plant 
which emptoys about 600 workers open. Standing beside him is employee Gtoria McCall 
holding a sign that reads: H have 48 years. What about me?" At left is U.S. Commerce 
Secretary William Daley and U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slate. At right is State 
Senator Michael Morrissey. 



RAYTHEON EMPLOYEES LEFT no doubt about how they felt about the possible closing of 
the Quincy plant. From the left, Velia Padula, Rose Marie Hayden, Carol Frennette and 
Jacqueline Taytor. Holding the umbrella is Matt Palmer, son of an employee. 



Save Gas arKi Money 
Shop Locally 

rAGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

HOME 'AUTO •BUSINESS 
LIFE»nNANClAL 



s»^mm- 



Want to avoid checking fees'. 







Anthony L Agnitti, CIC, UA 

Cer^kd Insurance Counselor 

Licensed Insurance Advisor 

CAilRMAQMniONnonMDIAM] 

COVDMSATOOIffCnnVinBCB 

ASK ABOUT OUR MHO AND 

HOMEOWNER INSURANCE 

DiSCOUNT PROGRAMS 

24-HMr Eawfincy AccHi 

770-#123 
l21 FRANKLIN CT., QUINCY. 



en in 
uincy 

(It Gronite 
Crossini;! 



Direct Cheddi^ 
means direct savings. 



Avoiding checking fees is easy. Simply direct yourself to 
South Shore Savings Bank and arrange for direct deposit of your 
paycheck, social security check, or other regular payment to a 
Direct Qiecking Account. If s convenient ... and a terrific value: 

To open your Direct 
Checking Account, stop 
by any of our convenient 
locations or call us today 




NO monthly fee 



NO per check fees 



NO minimum balance 



Member FDIC/DIF 



South Shore 

SAVINGS BANK 

A great community bank! 
(800) 660-7800 

East Bridgewater • East Weymouth • Hanover/Noiwell 

North Weynxxith • Quincy • South Weynxxjth 

Weymouth • Weymouth Landing 



Page 4 Tlk* Quiaoiy Sun Thunday, July 1, 1999 



Ci^lNICN 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35« per copy. $1 5.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$17.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $20.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

Th« Quincy Sun assumM no financial re«pon*ibllty tor typographical errors In 
advartiMmanta but will reprint that part of an advertisement in which the typographical 
error occurs. 



Free Rosie O'Donnell 

T-Shirts To Mammogram 

Patients At Hospital 



For a limited time, eve- 
ryone who gets a mammo- 
gram at the Quincy Hospital 
Simon C. Fireman Imaging 
Center for Women will re- 
ceive a free T-shirt, com- 
pliments of The Rosie 
O'Donnell Show. 

The T-shirts, which read 
"I Got Squished," were sent 
to the hospital by comedian 
and talk show host Rosie 
O'Donnell.' The logo from 
the Rosie O'Donnell Show 
appears on the sleeve of the 
T-shirt. The giveaway is an 



attempt to raise awareness 
of the importance of regular 
mammogram screenings. 

Quincy Hospital provides 
free mammography screen- 
ings to women whose insur- 
ance does not cover this 
service through the Breast 
and Cervical Cancer Initia- 
tive and through the Marie 
A. Curry Fund. To find out 
more about free mammog- 
raphy screenings, call (617) 
376-5462. 

To schedule a mammo- 
gram, call (617) 376-4135. 



THE HISTORY CHANNEL. 

On June 28, 1776. Col. William Moultrie's batteries at 
Charleston, S.C. repulsed a British sea attack ... July 2, 
1776 the rontm«n»«J Congress adopted Richard Henry 
Lee's (Va.) motion "that these united colonies are and of 
right ought to be free and independent states" . . . July 4, 
1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved by 
the Continental Congress ... July 4, 1826, both Thomas 
Jefferson and John Adams died ... July 4, 1828, the first 
U.S. passenger railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio, was 
begun ... July 4, 1845, Texas Congress voted for annexa- 
tion by the U.S. ... July 1-3, 1863, Union forces won a 
major victory at the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania 
... July 2, 1881, President James A. Garfield was shot in 
Washington, D.C. ... July 2, 1890, the Sherman Antitrust 
Act was passed, beginning the federal effort to curb 
monopolies ... June 30, 1906, the Pure Food and Drug Act 
and the Meat Inspection Act both were passed . . . July 2, 
1921, a joint congressional resolution declaring peace with 
Germany, Austria, and Hungary was signed by President 
Warren G. Harding . . . July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart, avia- 
tor, and her co-pilot Fred Noonan were lost near Howland 
Island in the Pacific . . . July 1, 1943, wage and salary earn- 
ers became subject to a paycheck withholding tax ... July 
4, 1946, the Philippines was given independence by the 
U.S. ... June 29, 1949, U.S. troops were withdrawn from 
Korea ... June 30, 1950, President Truman approved 
ground forces and air strikes against North Korea . . . June 
29, 1956, the Federal-Aid Highway Act was signed, inau- 
gurating the interstate highway system . . . July 2, 1964, an 
omnibus civil rights bill was cleared by Congress and 
signed the same day by President Lyndon Johnson, banning 
discrimination in voting, jobs and public accommodations 
... June 29, 1966, U.S. planes began bombing Hanoi in 
North Viemam ... June 30, 1971, in a 6-3 vote, the 
Supreme Court upheld the right of the New York Times and 
the Washington Post to publish the classified Penugon 
papers ... July 4, 1976, the U.S. celebrated its bicentenni- 
al with festivals, parades, and New York City's Operation 
Sail, a gathering of tall ships from around the world. 



WHAT'S OPEN 
WHAT'S CLOSED 



On Independence Day 

Monday, July 5 

Retail stores, supermarkets open. 

Liquor stores open. 

Taverns, bars open. 

Banks closed. 

Stock market dosed. 

State, county, municipal offices closed. 

Schools closed. 

No mail delivery. 




Sumbeams 



By Henry Bosworth 



Who Will Have To Go? 




CAHILL 



HAROLD 




At least one of them is going to have to go. 
Will it be Tim Cahill, Paul Harold or Frank 
McCauley? 
Or, Peter Kolson? 

You just can't cram four councillors into three coun- 
cil at-large seats. 

Cahill, Harold and McCauley are the present occu- 
pants. And al- 
though they al- 
ready had some 
opposition, they 
seemed to be sit- 
ting fairly com- 
fortable as incum- 
bents up for re- 
election. 

Until Kolson 
suddenly and un- 
expectedly placed 
a thorn under the 

three seats. McCAULEY KOLSON 

Just about everyone who tollows Quincy politics 
knew that Kolson would give up his Ward 1 seat to 
run for Harold's at-large seat if the latter challenged 
Jim Sheets for mayor. 

But few~if anyone-thought he would run at-large 
if there wasn't an open seat to shoot for. Ward coun- 
cillors just don't do that. Not in recent years anyway. 
But he's running at-large. And with no open seat, 
he's taking on three hefty vote-getters. One of them a 
former mayor (McCauley) and the other two potential 
mayors. 
Why? 

Kolson, like Harold and Cahill, also has mayoral 
ambitions. The best stepping stone to the mayor's of- 
fice is a council at-large seat. Although not always. 
Sheets stepped from the Ward 4 seat 10 years ago and 
Walter Hannon from Ward 5 in 1971. 

The council presidency has also long been consid- 
ered a springboard to the mayor's office. 

In his case, this year, Kolson thinks it can take him 
to a council at-large seat. 

He is in his fourth and last year as council presi- 
dent. This means it is his last opportunity to take ad- 
vantage of the extra political exposure a council presi- 
dent gets. 

As an example, he got to co-host with Sheets the 
Raytheon workers rally held outside City Hall last Fri- 
day. 

He was up there in the spotlight with Senator Ed- 
ward Kennedy, Congressman William Delahunt, U.S. 
Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater and U.S. 
Secretary of Commerce William Daley. 

Cahill, Harold and McCauley and other political 
figures were there but more as part of the crowd. 

Kolson feels he has had a lot of exposure outside of 
Ward 1 as council president and as acting mayor when 
Sheets has been out of state on missions to Washing- 
ton, attending national conferences or on vacation. 

When you think it's time to make a move, you make 
it is the way he apparently sees it. And feels this is the 
time for him to make the move. 

His entrance makes three Ward 1 candidates in the 
at-large field. Harold and McCauley are the other two. 
There could be vote splitting there that could hurt 
one of them. If so, that would benefit Cahill. 

Cahill is sure to carry the Highpoint area because 
of his outspoken opposition to that controversial pro- 
posed development. That conflict of interest complaint 
against him has made him a political martyr in the eyes 
of some in the Quarry St. area. 

IVo years ago, Harold topped the field with Cahill 




KELLY 



second and McCauley third. 

Which would seem to make McCauley the one most 
threatened by Kolson 's bid. 

"Well," says McCauley, "I think we area all going 
to have to work our butts off.** 

There are four other candidates in the picture at the 
moment: Dave McGillicuddy, runner-up two years ago; 
Sabina Kavanagh Stenberg, Kevin Worley and Paul 
Holland, Jr. 

Their chances of winning a seat may be on the slim 
side but in a tight race they could have an effect on 
whether it's Cahill, Harold, McCauley or Kolson who 
has to leave. 

Q 

FORMER COUNCILLOR Leo Kelly was tempted 
to come back but has decided not to "^^^ 
run for the Ward 1 seat Peter Kolson 
is vacating. 

Kelly, who was elected to six 
terms and served two years as coun- 
cil president, says: 

"1 gave it some thought over the 
weekend. But, I've been there. Give someone else a 
chance." 

Kelly certainly would have been a strong contender 
and the one the others would have had to beat. 

His decision means that for the present there is no 
Houghs Neck candidate which is unusual. A candidate 
from that part of Ward l~a close knit community— 
always is a serious contender. 

Observers think there may be one yet. One name 
being mentioned: Russell Patten, Jr. of Babcock St., 
who recently took the Mass. Bar Exam. 

Q 
QUINCY'S UNCLE SAM Rounseville is featured 
this week on a special Roche Broth- 
ers Fourth of July cake. 

A photo of Rounseville in full 
regalia and tipping his hat has been 
scanned into the top of the cake. The 
photo was taken by Harry Brett of 
ROUNSEvilLLE Image Photo in Quincy. Below it are 
the words: "America, You're The Best!" 

The cake normally would go for around $21. But in 
keeping with the spirit of the holiday, Roche Brothers 
has come up with a special price with a patriotic ring 
to it: $17.76.' 

Rounseville, who legally changed his name to Uncle 
Sam a few years ago, quipped: "You might say that 
this is really putting the frosting on being Uncle Sam." 

□ 
CHRISTINE CEDRONE kicks off her campaign 
for re-election to the School Committee Thursday, July 
8 at a 6 to 9 p.m. fundraiser at Pat Flanagan's, 79 
Parkingway. Suggested donation $20. 

Q 

BILL WEED, who was the first candidate to announce 
for the Ward 1 council seat in Febru- 
ary, will take a short breather from the 
campaign trail July 13. 

Just for the day. He has two of the 
hard-to-get tickets for the All-Star 
game that day at Fenway Park. 

Weed has week-end season grand- wFED 

stand seats which gave him a shot at 
the All-Star seats. Only he had to settle for the bleachers- 
-at $50 per. 

"I've been offered $600 for each of them," he says. 
"But I'm not selling. I'm going to the game." 

Weed says this will no doubt be the last All-Star game 
at Fenway because of the plans to buiM a new park. 

"I'm going to be there for sentimental reasons," he 
says. 





Thursday, July 1, 1999 Thm QniiM»yam> Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 



♦,, 



ab 




THIS IS A 1934 postcard view of Wollaston Beach. 
Sqiiantttm is In the distance where you can sec the old 
water tower. Also in the middle of the picture, a chis- 
ter of swimmers are standing on one of the outfall pipes 
that were fivored places for diving and jumping. Based 
on the large number of people in the water you have 
to assume that if there was any pollution at the time it 



was not obvious. Yet the natural conditions now being 
blamed for Wollaston Beach's problems haven't 
changed much since 1934. The current pollution con- 
ditions now being blamed for Wollaston Beach's prob- 
lems haven't changed much since 1934. The current 
pollution conditions remain a puzzle. 

From the Collection of Tom Gdlvin 



Ri :\i)i Rs FoKiM 



Thanks School Administrators 
For Attending Safety Forum 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
I am writing to thank the 
administration of the 
Quincy Public Schools for 
attending my recent school 
safety forum. 

This conference was an 
opportunity for school su- 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

Recently I was informed 
that Ms. Laura Asci had 

retired as guidance coun- 
selor at North Quincy High 
School, after many years of 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

My name is William Pat- 
rick Gilcoine. I have lived 
on the same street in Quincy 
for over 50 years. I am an 
abutter of the Highpoint 
Project. My mother and 
brother also live on this 
street and feel the same as I 



perintendents, principals 
and administrators to gather 
together for special presen- 
tations on early intervention, 
conflict resolution, and legal 
protocols. The agenda was 
designed to address a broad 
range of prevention-related 
issues and concerns that had 



been brought to my atten- 
tion over the last several 
months. 

Although the month of 
June can be a particularly 
hectic and demanding pe- 
riod for school officials, top 
Quincy administrators made 
time to attend the forum. 



A Tribute To Laura Asci 



service. She assisted many, 
many seniors with finding 
scholarships and colleges 
for seniors to attend. 

As a parent, I will always 
be grateful to Ms. Asci who 
was a noble academician. 



When I dealt with her on 
behalf of my children, she 
was a considerate and com- 
passionate person. I wish 
her the best in her retire- 
ment and golden years. But 



Thanks To Tim Cahill 



do. We are adamantly 
against this project. 

I think it is wonderful to 
have a politician stand for 
his constituents rather than 
big money. I would like to 
thank Tim Cahill for his 
courage. Many politicians 
would have caved in under 



the circumstances presented 
to him. I would stand in 
front of a judge and state the 
truth, that Tim Cahill is 
standing up for me and my 
family. He is doing a great 
job! 

I have been a member for 
a field construction union 



Their participation helped 
make the event a success, 
and confirmed once again 
the proactive commitment 
to school safety that I have 
come to know in Quincy. 

William Keating 

Norfolk County 

District Attorney 



her gift to all the seniors that 
she had helped over her ca- 
reer, shall not be forgotten 
by*any of them. 

Atty. Leon PJ. Drysdale 
Quincy 



for 26 years. My union be- 
longs to the South Shore 
Building Trades, however 
they do not represent me on 
this issue. I feel this project 
will destroy this city. 

Bill Gilcoine 
Parker St. 



Heartfelt Thanks From Quincy Crisis Center 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
The Quincy Crisis Center 
sends a heartfelt thank you 
to all those who participated 
in the Letter Carriers Food 
Drive that was held on Sat- 
urday, May 8th. The Re- 
sponse from all those in- 
volved was overwhelming. 

Thank you in the letter 
carriers of Quincy for their 
participation in this annual 
food drive. As we picked up 
the food we sensed a genu- 
ine spirit of community and 
caring from the postal 
workers and even though 
they had an extra responsi- 
bility ad^ed to their day, 
they weni the "extra mile" 
widi a snlile on their face. 
Thank you letter carriers; 
we, and thtee who access 
our food DanVy, are reaping 



the benefits of your hard 
work and efforts. 

Thank you citizens of 
Quincy for the way you re- 
sponded so generously to 
this food drive. Your re- 
sponse was incredible and 
your generosity is going a 
long way in helping those 
who are in need. By looking 
at the volume of food that 
was donated it is evident 
that this city rose to the oc- 



casion and made this food 
drive a huge success. We 
thank you. 

Thank you to the volun- 
teers who helped us pick up 
and sort the food that day 
and also to those who have 
been coming in to help us 
sort and stock the donated 
food. You are our back bone 
and your partnership with us 
in invaluable. 

Again, .thank you to all 
who responded so gener- 



ously and worked so hard 
for this food drive. As we 
pack and deliver this food 
we are reminded that it 
came because generous and 
caring individuals re- 
sponded to the need. Thank 
you so much for partnering 
with us in our mission of 
advancing a culture of com- 
passion. 

Rev David B Wooster 
Executive Director 




Confed«rat« Brigadtor Genaral Thomaa Jackson was given the nickname 
StonewaN by a feHow Confederate brigadier general who tried to rally hia panicked 
troopa at the first iMttle of Bull Run by pointing to Jackaon and shouting, "Look, 
there le Jadcaon, slamfing like a t^orm waH." 



Quincy*s 
Yesterdays 

Rent Control 
In City Ends 



July 1-7 

1954 

45 Years Ago 



By PAUL HAROLD 

The Quincy Rent Control Board "waked" the death of 
rent control in the city at a dinner meeting at the Howard 
Johnson restaurant in Quincy 
Square. 

Ralph Lakin, executive 
secretary, noted that since its 
inception in 1942, the board 
held 42 meetings and handled 
3,21 1 cases. It was first established under federal control 
and later by local control. 

Rent control ended with the city council failed to 
extend its life. 

The office on the Parkingway was scheduled to close 
within the month with the lay off of all personnel. 
BY 4-3 VOTE CJHS TEACHER FIRED 

The school committee^ by a vote of 4-3, fire a Central 
Junior High School teacher for his failure to clarify his past 
connection with the Communist Party. 

Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa said he wanted to know if the 
teacher favored the "American Way" or the "Communist 
Way." He said he had a duty to the parents and the children 
not to return the teacher to his teaching post. 

Voting with Delia Chiesa were Paul Duffy, Alice Mitchell 
and Ethel Wiley. Voting against the dismissal were vice 
chairman Wendell Clark, Dr. Joseph McDermott and Dr. 
Charles Djerf. 
BONnRE HIGHLIGHTS ADAMS SHORE'S 4TH 

The largest bonfire in the city's history kicked-off July 
Fourth celebrations of the Adams Shore Community Club at 
the Heron Road beach. It was build by men in the neighbor- 
hood, under the direction of William Reardon. Francis 
McGinty was general chairman for the two-day celebration. 

Rep. William Jenness was given the honor of lighting the 
bonfire, with Councillor David Crowley awarding medals 
for the athletic competition. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

The North Quincy Associates held their most successful 
July 4th at Welcome Young Playground, providing pony 
rides for 900 youngsters. . . George McDonald, president of 
the Snug Harbor Improvement Association, said inclement 
weather forced the postponement of the neighborhood blodd^ 
dance. . . Leo Crowley was chairman for the Merrymount 
Association's 31st July 4th. . . Former School Committee- 
man L. Paul Marini was a candidate for the GOP nomination 
for state representative in the 2nd Norfolk district. . . Atty. 
Dace Moore of Lawn Ave. was a candidate for the Demo- 
cratic nomination for State Senator. . . Councillor Carl 
Anderson and Rev. Bedros Baharian backed parents who 
were protesting the transfer of 12 first-g(ade students from 
the Washington School to the Pollard. . . Robert Wilson was 
elected president of the Men's Brotherhood at Central Bap- 
tist Church. . . The Board of Appeals rejected a plan to 
convert the house at 568 Furnace Brook Parkway for use as 
a funeral home. . . John Barbadoroof Verchild St. graduated 
from Tufts College. . . Atty. Heslip Sutherland was installed 
as president of the Rotary Club. . . Guay's Bakery on 
Hancock St. was closing due to retirement. . . Delcevare 
King dedicated the 14 photo murals of South Shore sites in 
the main banking room of the Granite Trust Company. . . Dr. 
George MacKinnon of Wollastdn urged a 100-bed addition 
to the city hospital to reduce the wait for cancer patients. He 
said each week's delay for treatment reduced the chances of 
recovery by five percent. . . Marion Burke of Wollaston 
married George Dick at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy 
chapel in New Haven, Conn. . . Joan Kenney of Bromfield 
St. married Lt. (j.g.) Peter Chrisom, USMCof West Squantum 
St. at St. Ann's. . . William Ellis was chairman of the church 
"fiesta" at Star of the Sea. . . Eugetto DiBona was chairman 
for the Ave Maria K of Cs clam bake. . . George Yarrington, 
executive director of the Quincy Taxpayers' Association, 
wanted to know how the cost of the new Furnace Brook 
School rose in price by $43,500 in only three weeks. . . An 
estimated 600 attended the Order of the Eastern Star testimo- 
nial at the Masonic Temple for past state officers, Mabel 
Overhiser (matron), and Marie Burke (deputy grand mar- 
shal). . . James Asher of WJDA was regional director for the 
Red Feather campaign. . . James Mullin was named district 
deputy for the K of Q West Quincy No. 29. 



Page 6 Thm Quiiusgr Sun Thvnday, July 1, 1999 



Library Storyteller 
Series Begins July 6 



The Thomas Crane 
Public Library's 13th 
Season of the Summer 
Storytellers Series begins 
Tuesday, July 6 at 7 p.m. 
at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library 519 Sea St. 
with a puppet theater 
■performance by the 
Galapagos Puppets. 

Margaret Moody of 
Galapagos Puppet Theater 
presents "Monkey Wreaks 
Havoc in Heaven" a 
puppet show based on an 
episode from the Chinese 
legend Journev to the 
West . The unruly monkey 
Sun Wu-kung easts the 
Jade Emperor's prized crop 
of magical peaches, ruins 
the preparations for the 
Peach Blossom Banquet, 
and guzzles Lao-tze's 
elixirs of immortality. The 
show is performed with 
traditional Chinese 
puppets. This is a program 
for families with children 
ages 5 and older. 

At the same time a 
Pajama Time Story Hour 
with Dottie Moynihan will 
be offered for younger 
siblings accompanied by 
an adult and families with 
children under the age of 
five. "Monkp.yshines" is 
the theme for this week 
with stories about Curious 
George and other 
mischievous monkeys. A 
Curious George puppet 
craft will round out the 
program. 

More than 20 special 
events and programs for all 
ages will be happening 
during July and August. 
Calendars with all the 
details will be available at 
all library locations 



We need you. 




Declaration Of Independence 
Programs To Be Presented 
By National Park Service 



THE GALAPAGOS PUPPET Theater will open the 
Summer Storytellers Series Tuesday, July 6 at 7 p.m. at the 
Adams Shore Branch Library, 519 Sea St 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 



t$ 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



beginning June 1. Due to 
construction most 
programs will be held at 

the Adams Shore Branch 
Library, 519 Sea St. 

Registration for craft 
programs and a special 
presentation by the New 
England Aquarium is being 
held at the North Quincy 
Branch 381 Hancock St., 

in person or by phone at 
376-1320 during library 
hours. 

The performance 
schedule: 

Wednesday, July 7 at 
10 to 11:30 a.m. at the 
Adams Shore Branch 
Library. Craft Program. 
Make a mosaic using 
colorful tiles Ages 7 and 
up, registration required. 

Friday, July 9 at the 
Adams Shore Branch 
Library. 

Visit the New England 
Aquarium's Traveling Tide 
Pool. See and handle 
animals that live in salt 
marshes, sandy beaches 
and rocky coastal habitats. 
Children under 7 must be 
accompanied by an adult. 
Registration is required. 
Shows will be held at 



9:30, 10:30 and 11:30. 

Monday, July 12, 
Wednesday, July 14, and 
Friday July 16 at 3 p.m. 
at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library. 

A three-part craft 
program teaches how to 
make paper and books. On 
Monday make paper from 
recycled materials. 
Wednesday create 
marbleized paper for book 
covers and on Friday use 
your handmade papers to 
create a book. Ages 8 and 
older. Registration is 
required. 

Wednesday, July 28 at 
10:30 a.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library 

Craft Program. Create a 
brightly colored butterfly 
from paper. Ages 7 and 

older, registration is 
fequired. 

Friday, July 30 at 

10:30 a.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library. 

Clayworks with ann 
McCrea is a combined 
craft and story program. 
Hear a story, handle a 
variety of sculptures and 
create your own work of 
art. Ages 7-12, registration 
required. 



The National Park Serv- 
ice will present three special 
Fourth of July programs on 
the holiday to celebrate the 
passage of the Declaration 
of Independence by the 
Continental Congress July 
4, 1776. 

The public is invited to 
play a part in one of the na- 
tion 's greatest dramas. In 
this "Independence Day" 
program, members of the 
audience will assume the 
roles of delegates to the 
Continental Congress and 
represent their colonies in a 
debate that will determine 
the fate of a nation. 

Led by John Adams, "the 
Atlas of Independence," the 
debate becomes heated be- 
fore the flnal vote is called. 
Afterward, each delegate 
signs his or her name to the 
document, rings the Liberty 
Bell and receives a copy of 
the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. Afterward, slices 
of Liberty Cake will be 
served. 

Performances will be 
held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., 
from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 
to 9 p.m. at the Carriage 
House. 

Following the evening 
program, a candlelight pa- 
rade will begin from the Old 
House on Adams Street to 
the United First Parish 
Church. 

At the church, there will 




TWO SIGNERS of the Dedaration of IndcpcMlcncc, John 
Adams of Massachusetts, portrayed by John Stanwich, left, 
and Thomas Stone of Maryland, portrayed by William 
ndds, welcome delegates to the Second Continental Con- 
gress. 



be an official reading of the 
Declaration of Independ- 
ence after which bells will 
proclaim liberty throughout 
the land. 

All patriots will be in- 
vited to replenish them- 
selves with cake and bever- 
age at the Adams National 
Historic Park Visitor Center 
at 1250 Hancock St. 

The programs are free of 



charge but have a limited 
capacity and will be re- 
served on a first-come, first- 
served basis. Those who 
wish to attend should call 
the Adams National Histori- 
cal Park Visitor Center at 
(617) 7770-1175 to reserve 
a place at one of the ses- 
sions or for more informa- 
tion about this or other pro- 
grams. 



Jeffrey Melzack Receives 
Cambridge Art Assn. Award 



North Quincy High 
School art teacher, Jeffrey 
Melzack's painting "Be 
Still and Know" was 
chosen as one of the prize 
winners at the Cambridge 
Art Association National 
Prize Show. 

There were 4,000 en- 
tries from all 50 states. Art 
work from 37 states will be 



exhibited. Only 100 art- 10 pieces were given 

works could be chosen for 

the exhibit and from 100, specific prizes. 

Megan Madden On 
Fairfield Dean's List 





Megan C. Madden of 
Quincy, daughter of Kevin 
and Deborah Madden was 
named to the Dean's List 
at Fairfield University. 

Megan majored in 
business and was also 



active in Campus Ministry. 
She recently returned from 
10 days in Equador. 

A graduate of Notre 
Dame Academy in 
Hingham, she plans a 
career in marketing. 



CLifjoxd i 

• Elegant Designs 

• Gift Baskets 

• Roses Our Specialty 

1-800-441-8884 

Worldwide Delivery 

479-8884 
1229 HANCOCK ST., 
QUINCY, MA 02169 



FLORISTS 



FLOWERS by HELEN 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



JEWELRY 



l^oi5on •"'"« J**®'^ 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST.. (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 786-7942 

Handicapped Accessible 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 
761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

773-7620 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



Ptwtograptiy 
679 Hancock Strttt, Quinqf 



(Wolla^on) 
479-6888 



b 



Mention this ad 

^andreceroed . 

15^ discotmt ; 

myour . 

Winding flowers 



LIVERY 




KERRI LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

LIMOUSINES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
64 PaiMiigcr Stntch UmwriBci - Tom Can • Vaa* • Spcdil^ Vckkka 
^tUm^ * horn • AMrircnaria • raghOrt 
_^Bib^AnTvA * CoKoli • Airport • Sptciab OccMOM 

617-472.1118 Fax: 6 1 7-479-0288 




fULLSTIAAf 

MiEm 

Relax with casual outdoor dininq and a cold 

drink on our scenic pier & gazebo, located 

on the Neponset River. Enjoy delicious lobster, 

fresh steamers, succulent sea-grill or zesty 

barbequed chicken and ribs. 

Think of us for your next catered 

occasion, on-site or off-site. 

Graduations ■ Weddings ■ Birthdays 

Reunions ■ Corporate Events 




CLAMBAKE 



AT THE ^^^m GAZEBO 
Best Western ^^^^Adams Inn 
29 Hancock Street, Q^uincy 

61 7.328.1 SOO 



Opening JULY 1^^ 4:00 FM 
for casual outdoor d'mhigl 




\tsl(Tn 



/ 



azr 



^^^^w^ 



Thunday, July 1, 1999 TIm Quinoy Sun Page 7 



SCCIAL 



QEA Awards $13^00 
In Scholarships 

The Quincy Education High School were: Michele 

Association recently Alvarez, Amber Anderson, 

awarded a total of $13,300 Christina Cicci, Sara Di- 

in college scholarships to 40 Bona, Joseph Doyle, David 

graduating seniors from the Haendler, Hai Heng Huang, 

Quincy public schools. Chrystal Kelley, Laura 

"The Quincy Education McEvoy, Julie Miller, An- 

Association, Inc. is please to thony Monaco, Michael 

serve the students of the Roberts, Stephanie Tat, 

Quincy public Schools as William Tracey, Jane 

they move forward with Waibel, and Q)nnie Wong. 

their education," said Con- Recipients from the 

stance Graham, a teacher at Center for Technical Edu- 

the Wollaston Elementary cation included: Christopher • 

School and Chairwoman of Cullen, Anne Griswold, 

Kelly Ho, Kristen Perry, and 
Gina Pope. 

Awards were made to the 
following students from 
North Quincy High School: 
Kathleen Arnold, Daniel 
Fish, Kimberly Huerth, 
Tanya Hurd, Meredith 

Hutchinson, Michael Kelly, 
Quentin Lam, Kelly Lock- 
head, Kriston Moy, Mathew 
O'Mahoney, Alexis 
Pivnicny, Sarah Proto, 
Jeanne Sheehan, Michael 
Spencer, Mary Sullivan, 

Corinne Sullivan, Thomas 

recipients from Quincy Wilson, and Judy Wong. 

Erica Curtis Brown Graduate 

Erica Curtis, daughter Providence, R.L 
of Ms. Crete F. Curtis of 
Quincy, received a 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 
from Brown University in 

12 Residents Massasoit Graduates 

Twelve Quincy residents Keith C. Kabilian, Joseph P 
graduated from Massasoit Meade, Stephen F. Mitchell, 
Community College on June Kerry A. Newcomb, Stacey 

J. Norting, Erik J. Porthan, 



the QEA Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

The Quincy Education 
Association is the labor or- 
ganization which represents 
the educators of Quincy 
Public Schools from kinder- 
garten through Quincy Col- 
lege. Many of these awards 
are made in the memory of 
individual Quincy teachers 
who have passed on after 
giving decades of devoted 
service to the children of 
Quincy. 

The QEA scholarship 




Stephanie Narvaez 

Receives Honors At 

New Country Day School 



! 



Stephanie Narvaez, of 
Quincy, was honored for her 
outstanding academic record 
at the 119th annual distribu- 
tion of certificates and 
prizes at Newton Country 
Day School of the Sacred 
Heart. 

Narvaez, a junior, re- 
ceived a Red Ribbon Cer- 
tificate for achieving an 
average of B+ or above with 
no gpade below B-. Narvaez 
was also awarded academic 




STEPHANIE NARVAEZ 



SUZANNE EMERSON and MARK MOLLOY 

Suzanne Emerson Engaged 
To Mark Molloy 



prizes for Music Theory and Holy Cross Book Prize for 
Physics, and was recognized her exceptional academic 
for her outstanding per- achievement, specific ac- 



Curtis completed a 
concentration in English 
and American Literature. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bruce 
Emerson of Marshfield 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Suzanne 
Emerson to Mark D. 
MoUoy of Quincy. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John W.. Molloy of Quincy 
and Falmouth. 

Miss Emerson is a 
graduate of Marshfield 
High School and the 
University of New 
Hampshire. She is a 



formance on the National 
French Exam. 

Narvaez was also 
awarded the College of the 



tions that demonstrate a 
sincere concern for others, 
and a responsible attitude in 
all of her endeavors. 



teacher at Hanover High 
School. 

Mr. Molloy graduated 
from Boston College High 

School and Wesleyan recently graduated from 
University in Middleton, Stonehill College 



10 Residents Graduate 
From Stonehill College 

Ten Quincy residents 



in 



Conn. He received a 
master's degree from 
U/Mass, and is a teacher 
and coach at Hanover 
High School. 

A summer wedding is 
planned. 



Eastori. 



They are: Abigail 
Anastasi, Cum Laude; 
Michelle Demaggio; 
Rodney Dixon; Daniel 
Donahue; Regina Hunter; 



Thomas Malvesti; Erin 
Maw.i; Matthew 

McDonough; Kevin 
Nichol; Daniel Smith. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Teresa Ryan Inducted 
Into Honor Society 



Summer B. Sherrick, An- 
thony C. Shweiri, Jose Ur- 
day. 



The graduates are the 
following: 

Peter Damon, William V. 
Dowting, Jaime E Calvin, 

Mr., Mrs. Stephen Fox 
Parents Of Son 

Patricia and Stephen 
Fox of Quincy, are parents 
of a son, Matthew Richard 
bom May 5 at Brigham & 

3 Residents On 



Westfield Deans List 

Three Quincy residents 
have achieved the Dean's 
List for the Spring semester 
at Westfield State College. 

They are: 

Steven Barrett of 17 
Clifton St., a Criminal Jus- 
tice major; Nancy Walker of 
7 Unity St., an Elementary 
Education major; and 
Christoirfjer Brundage of 51 
Channing St., a Psychology 
major. 



Women's Hospital, Boston. 
Grandparents are 

Richard Monahan of 
Quincy and the late 
Patricia Monahan and 
Carol Fox of Braintree and 
the late Richard Fox. 



Teresa Ryan of Quincy, 
a Fontbonne Academy 
Student, was among 122 
high School Seniors 
recently inducted into the 
St. La Salle Honor Society 
at Manhattan college in 
the Bronx, N.Y. 

Jennifer Hill 
On Dean's List 

Jennifer Lynn Hill of 
Monroe Rd., Quincy was 
on the third-term Dean's 

List at North west 
Nazarene College, 
Nampa, ID. 



She and the other 
inductees were honored for 
their academic 

achievements and future 
potential. 



UTILE WILLOWS 
PRESCHOOLVdv 

773-6173 i^ 

• SUMMER FUM^ 

2 and 3 Day ProgrmM 
UowiMd SlifflngAnMN Qroups 

ALSO ACCIPimO FAU 
REOSTfUTIONS 

WMUy IhmiM. FMd TMpt, 
Orata, PwMhiQ, wid Funl 

Our cunieuluin !• dMiQnad «fMi your 
Vwy Important riaattiuulai in mind 

SOWMowSt-Wollailon 




Adams Inn 

29 Hancock St.. North Quincy. MA 02171 

617-320-0269 

"Enjoy Poolsldc Service *^ith a Smile and a Sunset' 

Steaks. ddQ Chicken. Ka-bobs & Morel 

Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner 

EhJTERTAINMENT 

Thurs.. July 1 - 3rook Street 0and 

FrI.. July 2 - Eu(jcnc Roland 



'.*t. 




M 



^ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

\ and 

H STAMPS 

\Maple St., 
Quiiw, MA 02169 

47' 



I 



Add a Me 

tobreak&st! 

Our heaily hotcakes feature a delightful ra^berry butter and 
^ole ra^berries. . . perfect far summer! 

An old fworite. . .Hearth a Kettle style. . .our rich H '0 K loaf, 
hand-cut in thick slices topped with ra^)berry butter and 
wlmle raspberries. 

Serving Breakfast daily from 7:00am 



With a New nm 






IBYMOirra • exit 16, Dortfa est 00 ne. 18 

PUNOlflH • 25 Sumner St at the joho Cirnr fam 

• Hjfanis • Yvaooii • OileiK 

wwnhaitiilgtrif COB 




Womfin'fi Hnir Cute ff»AW/)^«/.«.^.......^..$25°° 

Monday Special statt/ng 9t^,„ .„.$22°° 

J^o\\tst9tting9t, ..^^ ««.....«^«...«. .^...„«„......«.„.„^^^.^„.^65°° 

Highlights StUttlhg «/...MM.M.MM..MM.MM..MM..MMMM....MM...M....WMM.MM.M...$4X)^ 



00 



r 6fnS pneltidlng cut) StQtf/ng ^r«— »—»««——.»—««»«.»»— »m««,„.«, ^ »« „ , „ ,, „ , „„„ ,, „ , „ »3o 

Make-over /T/m inMk»-owt w/th « tSO.00 m^ko-up ^/cA«mJL..........«.«..«^^^^^.^20°° 



Men'BHalrcut«.....«....«...„.«,«...^..«^^„^^„.^.«„«,.^^,.^^„....„^,^„.$l50o 
Tuesday & Thursday S|>eclalc r/»/'W/i^«/:.^...«....„^^.^«,«^..^«^„...^*13°° 

Bridal Packages Available • Also featuring a full service nail division 
We carry a full line of hair care products 

^ AVE DA 




Tsmn 






Paces TlM Qulnoy 0un Thiinday, July 1, 1999 



Quincy Blues Festival Promotes Literacy, Education 




V. J^ j**S:ir . 



SAXOPHONIST GREG PICCOLO of "Heavy Juice" was 
among the dozen blues artists who were featured at 
Sunday's seventh annual Quincy Blues Festival at Veterans' 
Memorial Stadium. 



DAVE MAXWELL, keyboardist for the legendary James 
Cotton Band, performs at Sunday's seventh annual Quincy 
Blues FestivaL 

(Presidential Camera Photos) 



BLUES FAVORITE Shiriey Lewis sings one of her bhies* 
hits at the seventh annual Quincy Blues Festival Sunday. 
Festival Producer Joe H^jjar term the event a success. The 
whole dty should be proud of this event It's all about what 
you accomplish and this event has goodwill like no other 
event. It's reputable family oriented event and it's in 
Quhicy." 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Lance Morganelli) 





QUINCY BLUES FESTIVAL Producer Joe H^jar (right) receives a Ufetime achievement 
award trom the New England Blues Society at Sunday's seventh annual festival at Veterans' 

—— - - - " Memorial Stadium. Making the presentation are Wues legend James Montgomery and Dana 

JAMES COTTON, the headline act at Sunday's seventh annual Quincy Blues Festival, Wolf^ president of the New England Blues Society. The award recognizes Hi^ar's dedkation 

performs one of his many hits. l„ promoting the Uues and commemorates the 10th anniversary of the Yard Rock, Hoar's 

k>cal Uues spot on East Howard St 




RICKY 'KING' RUSSELL (left) is greeted by George Bowman (center) of State Street and 
Walt Frazier of Frazier Marketing during the seventh annual Quincy Bhies Festival Sunday. 
State Street Corporation was a sponsor of the festival which promoted reading, literacy and 
education. A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit the Thomas Crane Public 
Library Foundation, Inc., which b planning to use the money to help finance the library's 
renovation and new addition. 




BRUCE KATZ belts out a Uues hit on the keyboards during the seventh annual Qufaicy/ 
Blues Festival at Veterans Memorial Stadhim. Despite tonperatnres fai the 90's, the Cestiv^ 
attracted an esttmated 2,000 BOsk lovers of aB i^cs. 



All-star School Band 
To Perform At Beechwood Center 



The Quincy Middle 
School's All-Star Band 
will liven up the Seniors' 

Independence Day cele- 
bration at Beechwood on 
the Bay today (Thursday). 



Under the direction of 
Dick Striano, the students 
will entertain with a 
variety of selections, in- 
cluding national favorites. 
The concert is an annual 
event. 



Lunch will be served at 
Beechwood at 11:30 a.m. 
and the concert will begin 

at 12:15 p.m. ReservaticHis 
are required. Call 617-471- 
5712 for more information. 



8 Residents Graduate U-Mass Lowell 

Eight Quincy residents Jaime Graham, Douglas Gregory Stipkovic^ and 
have graduated from the Nolan, John Scanlon, LapTong. 

University of Massa- 2 Residents On St Aoselm Dcarf List 

chusetts, Lowell. 7 

Two Quincy residents Th^X ■'»<' t" majors 

They arc: have been named to the '^®- Christinr E. Maus, 

Eva Leung, Anthony Dean's List at Saint Anselm Nursing; Siobfun P Maus, 

Bianco, Matthew Dwyer, College, Manchester, NH. Business. 



Thurs(biy,Jiily 1,1999 Tli* Quliftoj' Shin Pace9 



Kolson Makes It Official: 
He's Running At-Large 



Cheney To Head 
Hanley Campaign In Ward 1 



City Council President 
Peter Kolson, who has 
served as Ward 1 councillor 
for the past 10 years, 'is a 
candidate for councillor-at- 
large.. 

**I have the knowledge, a 
proven record of accom- 
plishments and the leader- 
ship ability to guide the citi- 
zens of Quincy through the 
maze of government," Kol- 
son said. 

"Being the Ward 1 coun- 
cillor for the past 10 years 
has given me a unique per- 
spective on which direction 
the city of Quincy should be 
moving in the next millen- 
nium," he said, adding he 
wants to continue working 
on the many issues and pro- 
grams he has been involved 
with as council president, 
such as the future of Quincy 
Hospital, the shipyard and 
the city's finances. 

"When I first ran for of- 
fice," Kolson continued, "I 
said I wanted to improve the 
quality of life for all the 
constituents that I serve in 
Ward 1. I will bring that 
same type of commitment to 
all the citizens of Quincy." 

Quality of life issues 
have been a mainstay of 
Kolson 's political career, 
working to replace miles of 
seawalls, revitalize wetlands 
and rezone acres for open 
space. 

"1 have had a long- 
standing reputation protect- 
ing our environment, and 
one of my first priorities as 
a councillor-at-large would 
be to establish a landbank to 
protect and acquire open 
space," he said. 

Even before he entered 
public office, Kolson had 
led the Quincy Coalition to 
stop the placement of a 
toxic waste incinerator near 
his neighborhoods. 

In Ward 1 he pushed to 
have abandoned properties 
replaced with structures the 
community can be proud of, 

pointing to the River Bay 
Club which became one of 




PETER KOLSON 

the South Shore's first as- 
sisted living facilities and to 
the former abandoned Dut- 
ton's restaurant which is 
now the Custom House res- 
taurant.. 

Kolson worked with state 
and local officials to save 
Hurley's Boat Rental Facil- 
ity so that the public would 
have access to the water for 
generation to come and was 
instrumental in establishing 
with the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency re- 
duced costs for flood insur- 
ance for coastal residents. 

He continues to Hght for 
lower water and sewer rates 
and serves on the National 
Committee of Environment 
and Energy for the National 
League of Cities. 

Public safety has been 
important to Kolson as well. 
He promoted community 
policing and brought back 
the K-9 and horse patrols to 
ensure public safety. 

"I worked hard to secure 
$75 million in bond authori- 
zations for rehabilitating 
and building qew schools 
and for another $3.5 million 
bond to renovate and/or 
build new playgrounds and 
basketball courts for the 
entire city," he said. 

And, not to forget the 
senior citizens, Kolson 
added, "I feel we need to do 
more for the elderly who are 
living on fixed incomes by 
way of property tax relief so 
they can remain in their 
homes as long as they 



wish." He said he would 
like to expand the senior 
transportation programs as 

well so the elderly do not 
feel housebound. 

"The city of Quincy will 
he making some tough fi- 
nancial decisions in the next 
few years, and I do not want 
to see the neighborhoods 
bear the burden of those 
fiscal constraints," Kolson 
said. 

"People choose to live in 
Quincy because of its 
neighborhoods. It is impor- 
tant that we continue to find 
the funding sources to make 
the needed infrastructure 
and safety impr6vements to 
protect our greatest asset — 
the neighborhoods," he said. 

Kolson, director of fa- 
cilities for" the Quincy 
Housing Authority, is a 
former 18-year member of 
the Local 133 and three-year 
member of the Quincy 
Shipbuilders Union and a 
Viet Nam-era veteran. 

He and his wife, Judith 
Butler-Kolson have been 
married 28 years and have 
five children and a grand- 
son. 

Like her husband, she is 
active in the community, 
serving on the board of di- 
rectors of both the Manet 
Community Health Centers 
and the Maria Droste Coun- 
seling Center and on the 
Keep It In Quincy Commis- 
sion. 



Gregory Hanley, candi- 
date for the Ward 1 City 
Council seat, announces that 
former Councillor Michael 
Cheney will serve as his 
campaign manager. 

"Mike's experience and 
organizational skills will be 
a real asset in this cam- 
paign," Hanley said. 

Cheney has served as 
both Ward 1 and councillor 
at-large. 

Hanley 's brother. Matt, 
will be the campaign treas- 
urer. 



Hanley also announced 
the precinct coordinators for 
his campaign: 

Precinct 1, Michael and 
Noreen O'Connell of 
Chickatobot Rd.; Precinct 2, 
Anne Marie Hanley, his 
wife. Shed St.; Precinct 3, 
Mark and Lorie Peccee of 
Putnam St.; Precinct 4, Rob 
and Cheryl Glynn of 482 
Sea St.; Precinct 5, Joseph 
Monahan, Madeleine St. 

Hanley said he has also 
added more than 150 people 
as campaign volunteers. 



"I am so fortunate to 
have a great committee and 
so many good people behind 
me in this election," he said. 

Hanley said he has 
knocked on doors in over 
half of Ward 1 and has re- 
ceived a warm reception. 

"I want to hear each per- 
son's opinion on how they 
want me to represent them," 
Hanley said. 

He invited anyone wish- 
ing to help in the campaign 
to call him or his wife at 
472-1005. 



Two Central Graduates Receive 
Quincy Legion Post Awards 



Quincy Legion Post 95 
recognized two 

outstanding graduates of 
Central Middle School 
recently, at an awards 
night, at Quincy High 
School. 

Robert Leo Eng, past 
State Commander and 
Awards Chairman 



presented American 
Legion school awards to 
Erin McFarland and 
Norman Yuen. Former Sgt- 
At-Arms David G. Wood, 
presented personal gifts of 
school award lapel pins to 
each winner. 

Eng also presented to 
retiring principal Lou 



DiMartinis a meritorious 
service plaque, for his 
contribution to the youth of 
the city of Quincy, as an 
educator. Eng noted that 

DiMarinis had played 
center field of the Quincy 
Legion Baseball Team in 
1954. 



Due to Independence Day, Sunday, July 4, 1 999, rubbish 
collection will be a day late and will follow this schedule. 
Rubbish usually collected on Monday will be collected on 
Tuesday. Tuesdays will be collected on Wednesday, etc. 
There will be a Saturday collection for rubbish usually 
collected on Friday. This applies to all routes. BFI 



Ever wish you were 



in an SUV 




Neponset 
Pet Center & 
Animal Hospital 

> FuHSeivlte Veterinary Hosfrital 
• Pet Grooming • Pet Training 
Pet Boarding • Full Pet Supplies 

$17vEnRiNAinrvisiT 

only whk coupon, oxplim 7/31/99 



$3.00 OFF 

Any Grooming, Veterinary or Boording Service 

miimBcouNKcmorKammDvmm(mmoffas,Brms7/tim 



instead of b 



done? 




V 



$2.00 Off 



Any Pet Supplies {wMmm $15.m) 
Mll1mcoy^ol^<MMH(OMttnw^MMo^KiOllfB^B^m^7/sl/99 



%] MORRISSEY BLVD., DORCHESTER 
P»n^OitwyM 617-288-2333 



Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) are 
the most popular vehicles in 
America today for lots of good 
reasons. They're safer, they're more 
comfortable, they put you on top 
of the world ... they're just more 
fiin! Get your SUV or any new car 



with a Fast & Easy "Great Rate! 

Auto Loan from 

Colonial Federal 

Savings Bank. 

Come see us. Or 

caU 617-471-0750 



6.99 



% 

APR 



NMvCvrMorW) 



and ask for Angela or Richard. 





COUNOAL RDERAL SIVINGS BANK 

QUINCY: 1 5 Beach St., next to Wollaston Post Office 617-471-0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle & Washington Sts., next to Stop& Shop 781-331-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin St.. next to Stop& Shop 781-767-1776 

Annual Pnventage Rate (APR) tubjccl to change. Payment rquak $23.94 prr $1,l)0() boriowcdL 

Other ratCT & terrm and used car loan nicn arc availabie. It may also make Wme 
to pay for your new car Ming a home equity loan. Please ask for more information! 



PDIC 



aS 



Page 10 TlM Qulaosr 0uub Thunday, July 1, 1999 



D'Amico To Seek 
Ward 4 Term 



Ward 4 Councillor Mi- 
chael D'Amico is running 
for a third term. 

In making his an- 
nouncement at the Common 
Market restaurant, D'Amico 
said his ongoing efforts 
have secured more private 
and public funding for infra- 
structure improvements in 
the city's history. 

He cited Crown Colony 
as an example of what re- 
sponsible development has 
meant under his watch. "In 
today's Ward 4, developers 
know that their proposals 
must serve the people's in- 
terest above all else. 

"We've made sure that 
this community is served 
well by Crown Colony 
where thousands of profes- 
sional jobs have been cre- 
ated and hundreds of new 
homes have been built," he 
said. 

"And because of our 
plans for constructing for a 
connecting access ramp to 
the Southeast Expressway, 
not only will Crown Col- 
ony not impede traffic flow, 
the property will actually 
lend itself to making travel 
easier for the multitudes of 



.^.•^- 




NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



MICHAEL D'AMICO 

motorists who use Centre 
Street every day," said 
D'Amico. 

Another development to 
which he points with pride 
is the Quarry Hills 27-hold 
golf course and recreational 
facility off Ricciuti Drive. 
"We should all be glad that 
a once-blighted landfill is 
well on its way to becom- 
ing another Quincy Jewel," 
he said, noting that more 
than half of the fill needed is 
in place to make the project 
a reality by 2002. 

He said the neighborhood 
golf course task force he 
commissioned played a ma- 
jor role in minimizing the 
project's impact on the sur- 
rounding vicinity and vowed 
to keep street sweepers on 
the job "day and night if 
necessary" to control the 
dust generated from the con- 



struction site. 

D'Amico also noted that 
three full-time police foot 
patrol units are now on duty 
because he fought for com- 
munity-based policing be- 
fore most anyone else and 
credited a 200-plus member 
community crime watdi 
group for nurturing a posi- 
tive relationship among 
neighbors and the law en- 
forcement community. 

As chairman of the city 
council's education commit- 
tee, D'Amico said he has 
woiiced to see that the 
schools are being refur- 
bished. More than $150,000 
in private and public money 
have been earmailced to 
renovate everything from 
the gymnasium and audito- 
rium to the cafeteria and 
classrooms at Sterling Mid- 
dle School, he said. At Lin- 
coln-Hancock, new land- 
scaping and new play- 
grounds are slated. 

"It's not enough to tell 
kids they need to care about 
their education; we need to 
give them reasons why they 
should," he said. 

He concluded his remarks 
by observing that ordinary 
people in Ward 4 have been 
empowered to help make 
tough decisions affecting 
their quality of life and 
vowed he would continue to 
hold neighborhood meetings 
and answer phone calls to 
keep the residents informed. 



Established 
in I960 

20 years under 
same ownership 




DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

Starting at *4^^ 

ll:30am-3 :00pm 
Monday - Saturday 

Famous for Home Cooking 
Generous Portions - Reasonable Prices 

Efitertsinment 

Wednesday through Sunday Nights 



n^estai4rant b Lounge 
15 "Franklm direct. Quincy. MA 02/69 • ^ei 412-W5 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 







Wishing 

you and ^^^ 

your (Tj 

family 

a safe and 

enjoyable 

4th of July 

Joe Newton 

Candidate for Ward 6 City Councillor 

Paid fw by the Cwnmittee to dect joe Newton, Leslie Coug^lin-lreasurer, 21 Edgewortt Rd., N. Quincy 




Rosemary Wahlberg Announces 
For Ward 1 City Council Seat 



Rosemary Wahlberg, 
who is retiring Sept. 1 as 
executive director of Quincy 
Community Action, Inc., 
after 26 years, is launching a 
new career at the age of 68. 

She announced Monday 
that she is running for the 
City Council from Ward 1, 

"I have 26 years experi- 
ence as the manager of a 
large agency," said 
Wahlberg. "I think that 
gives me the experience to 
be of some help to the 
community. 

"Now that I have retired 
and the family has grown 
and left home, I am ready to 
compete for a position I 
have long been interested in. 

"Much of my time at 
QCAP was spent visiting 
and understanding the 
Quincy Council and the 
Great and General Court in 
order to insure that their 
performance would be pro- 
viding care to the city of 
Quincy." 

The Council seat from 
Ward 1 is currently occu- 
pied by Peter Kolson, a 10- 
year veteran of the Council, 
who has served notice that 
this year he is going to run 
for one of the three Council- 
at-large seats. 

She and her husband, 
Archie, have lived in Ward 
1 for 42 years, 14 of them in 
Germantown, since moving 
to Quincy from Dorchester. 

She was service director 
of the Germantown Center 
before taking over QCAP in 
1973 and moving her fam- 
ily, which numbered seven 
children, to a new home at 
264 Southern Artery, Mer- 
rymount. 

Wahlberg, whose name 
is well-known throughout 
the city, said she chose to 
lun as a ward councillor 




ROSEMARY WAHLBERG 

because she knows the peo- 
ple and problems of Ward 1 
intimately. 

"All my life in Quincy I 
have lived in Ward 1," she 
said. " 1 helped to start 

so many things in the ward 
and I would like to see them 
through. Many of them have 
become models for the rest 
of the city. 

"Housing is a number 
one problem in the city. I 
have 15 years experience, 
13 as chairman, on the 
Quincy Housing Authority. 

"Any parent of a child 
would consider education 
important. With seven chil- 
dren, I have always been 
active in parent groups. 
Now many of my 21 grand- 
children are in Quincy 
schools. 

"Early childhood educa- 
tion is critical. I was a 
charter member of South 
Shore Day Care. About 50 
per cent of the work of 
QCAP has been in early 
childhood education." 

Wahlberg has never run 
for public office before, 
although she won a mock 
election for the state senate 
in 1948m while she was 
living in Dorchester. 

"It only lasted one day," 
she said. "It was to try to get 
young people interested in 



the political process. The 
war was over, the men weit 
coming home from the 
service and everyone had 
deep patriotic feelings. 

"It's sad to see that many 
young people still are not 
interested." 

Wahlberg said her ap- 
pointment as a commis- 
sioner on the Quincy Hous- 
ing Authority by Mayor 
Frank McCauley in 1981 
had all the trappings of an 
election to public office. 

"When I became com- 
missioner, the tenants had 
an opportunity to listen to 

the interested parties and 
then vote on them," she 
said. "It is important that 
you stand before the people 
you serve." 

The mayor, of course, 
was the appointing authority 
and Wahlberg was reap- 
pointed twice to five-year 
terms. 

She also served on the 
Quincy Hospital Board of 
Directors but the press of 
work at QCAP caused her to 
leave after four years. She 
was one of the founders of 
the Manet Health Center in 
Houghs Neck. 

But Wahlberg has been 
active in politics most of her 
life. 

She and Archie have 
been members of the Ward 
1 Democratic Committee 
since 1976 and she was a 
delegate to the convention 
of 1988 which nominated 
Gov. Michael Dukakis for 
president. 

The Wahlberg family is 
not only enthusiastic about 
Rosemary's nev career, but 
Archie will serve as her 
campaign manager. John 
Kane, former president of 
the Shawmut Bank of 
Wakefield will be finance 
chairman. 



J-^eace of nllnd 

Face & Body Spa 

Massage Therapy • Facials 

• Manicures • Pedicures 

• Waxing • Electrolysis pe^g ' 

• Make-up Application aVEDA Cellex-C 

587 HANCOCK STREET, NORTH QUINCY • 617-773-8882=*' 







1 Hour Photo Finishing • Photo Restoration 



• Same Day Slides (E-6) 

• Enlargements 
•Reprints 

• Dupe Slides 

• Slides From Prints 



• Slides From PowerPoint 
& Harvard Graphics 

• Internet Ready Photos 

•Videos From Pictures 
Slides & Movies 

• Instant Passport Photos 



PhotoQuick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock 8t Quincy Center 

ViaH in at w«Mi.plM>HMiiiickquincy.com 
Hours: M-F e:30-6pm * Sat 10-3pm 




Thunday, July 1, 1999 Tlk* Qulaogr Siui Page 11 



Paul, Marilyn DeBesse Lucky 
'Blue Bin' Grand Prize Winner 

M ontclair Couple 

$1,000 Richer 

Thanks To Recycling 



Paul and Marilyn De- 
Besse of Hamilton Ave. in 
Montclair won the $1,000 
grand prize as part of the 
city's "Blue Bin Instant 
Win" recycling incentive 
program. 

The DeBesses were 
among 200 eligible resi- 
dents who, accompanied by 
family and friends, who 
filled the Council Chamber 
of City Hall last Wednesday 
hoping for that 1 in 200 
chance of reaping $1,000 
for participating in Quincy's 
cuibside recycling program. 

The eight-week Blue Bin 
Instant Win program, which 
ran from April 26 to June 
18, was designed to stimu- 
late participation by finan- 
cially rewarding Quincy 
residents for recycling. 
Forty random Quincy recy- 

Brendan 
St Anselm 

Brendan J. O'Brien, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. James 
O'Brien of 14 Colby Rd., 
North Quincy, recently 
earned a Bachelor of Arts 
degree in History from St. 
Anselm College in Man- 



clers shared $4,000 in prize 
money during the program's 
eight weeks. Five nights of 
the $100 winners were se- 
lected for the $1,000 grand 
prize drawing. 

The vast majority of the 
residents eligible for the 
drawing attended, creating 
the need to use City Hall's 
second floor conference 
room in addition to the City 
Council Chamber. The con- 
ference room had a closed 
circuit cable television 
hookup sop people in that 
room could see Mayor 
James Sheets draw the name 
of Mr. and Mrs. DeBesse. 

As he pulled the winner's 
name from the basket. 
Sheets joked, "This is where 
I make one friend and many 
enemies." Just before the 
drawing, the mayor spoke 
and reminded the audience 

O'Brien 
Graduate 

Chester, NH. 

O'Brien was a member 
of the Red Key Society 
which is an "honor through 
service" organization for the 
college. O'Brien plans a 
career in business. 



>l«irv4'l I iiiM'v Itoniil V Sliop 

) & up 



/( //( < (/ \Lll) ( nidi IMs 



1'. 'Ih ill! .7///>//(/\/N ,,11 ( ,,}-iCi //!(■ ( ohnur^ 

\ ilhtltih il I'iirkii':: * < ^ju n f' ,'i:i\\ III S 1 1( i,n>i 

5(()TT\(,I. \\l.. gi IN( ^ •617-47:.%S1 




by Laura Andrus and Joan F. Wright 

DinclertfkMului DineUrtfCmmnilj Ktklmu 

NEVER TOO LATE 

It is a mistake for seniors andsuggestk)nsonhowtobest 
to assume it is too late fw them care for your health. At Ma- 
to adopt healthier habits in the rina Place, a senior living resi- 
belief that the damage has al- dence, we offer assistance with 
ready been done. While it is medication management, an 
certainly preferable to start individual wellness program 
healthy habits early and to sus- including fitness elates, and 
tain them for a lifetime, it is social and cultural programs, 
ahnost never too late to take For gracious living in scenic 
steps that reverse decades of seaside location, visit Four 
neglect and abuse. For in- Seaport Drive. Many apart- 
stance, five years after people ments have views of the Bos- 
of any age sb^ smoking, they ton skyline, harbor, and salt 
have neariy die same cardio- marshes. Phone: 617-770- 
vascular risk as dMse who have 3264.. 
never smoked. Their cancer Maintaining or improving 
risk declines K wen, at a sraie- your health and vitality is 
what dower rate. And, seniors simple at Marina Place. A 
«iio begin aerolncexeidse can team of experienced health- 
raise their cardiovascular fit- care professionals deliver per- 
ness by die same 10% to 30% s(mal care assistance. You can 
» younger people can. rest assured knowii^ someone 

Curraitnie(ficalreseaidiis is here for you 24 hours a day, 
ihvaysdiaqgiqg,ii4Bcfaiswhy every day of die weeL 
helps to have medical pro- PS Exerdse eon lengthen 
neaiby dial you trust life even if you start whenyou 
yon tfadr evahntioos are older. 



:^A 




that we should remember 
that America has been 
blessed to have the great 

abundance of natural re- 
sources in the world. He 
said that recycling is our 
obligation so that we can 
pass this natural endowment 
on to future generations.' 

Also speaking at the 
event was City Council 
President Peter Kelson, one 
of the original members of 
the Quincy Recycling 
Committee that designed 
Quincy's recycling pro- 
gram. Kolson told the at- 
tendees, "Recycling is one 
way that you, that we, can 
make a difference. And just 
remember, tonight everyone 
is a winner." 

Public Works Commis- 
sioner David Colton told the 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS and City CouadI President Pfetcr Kolson present the $1,000 "Blue 
Bin" InsUnt Win recycling program grand prize to Paul DcBcssc of Hamilton Ave. in 
MoDtdair. At right is Sally Owen, chairperson of the Quincy Recycling Commission. 



crowd, "Quincy's program 
is strong today and the 
credit belongs to you." 

"You could feel the ex- 
citement in the room," said 
Sally Owen, chairperson of 
the Quincy Recycling 
Committee. "We tried to 
make recycling exciting to 
people and I think we suc- 
ceeded. This incentive cam- 
paign, and the people who 
participated, gave recycling 
a shot in the arm. 

"We expect that it will 
raise recycling levels. 



minimize our impact on the 
environment, and save the 
city })udget some money. It 
was a real win'-win situa- 
tion," she added. 

The Blue Bin Instant 
Win Sweepstakes was spon- 
sored by the City of Quincy 
and the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Environmental 
Protection. Prize money was 
donated by the following 
local businesses: Caryn's 
Comer; Law Office of Cos- 
grove, Eisenberg, and Kiley; 
CVS; East Coast Petroleum; 



Law Office of Graeber and 
Davis, Inkspot, Osco 
(Granite St. and North 
Quincy), Meredith and 
Grew, Quincy Sun, Roche 
Brothers, Roseann's, Mayor 
James Sheets, Star Market, 
Stop & Shop, and WJDA. 
Assistance was also pro- 
vided by MassRecycle and 
the Recycling Initiative 
Campaign. 

For information about 
Quincy's recycling pro- 
gram, call the Recycling 
Hotline at 770-BINS. 



The Samoset Pharmacy Tradition 
is not dead, it is alive and well at... 




in North Quincy! 
475 Hancock Street! 



SUNDAY BOSTON 
GLOBES & HERALDS 



$1.50 




L 



Price Valid at this Osco Drug location only, until at least 8/1/99! 



I SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAlJ, 

I 5 for $6 

I • 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 
j • 1 gallon of }Nest Lynn Milk (1 %, 2% or fat free) • Best Buy 
I English Muffins • Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

I Offer valid while supjpiies last, one special per coupon. Vk reserve the rigfit to limit quantities. Price increase due to our increased milk cost. 



Vdid Sundaif 7/4/99 only. Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. 

Your Osco in North Quincy, 

A Big Store Carrying 
On a "Nahorhood " Tradition. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted 

(Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-noon) 



y 



Page 12 Tli* Quliaosr 8ian Thunday, July 1,1999 




Victory Taking Over 
Shaw's N.Q. Supermarket 



CITIZENS BANK rcccnUy contributed $10,000 to Quincy 2000 to help the non-profit group 
continue offering financial assistance and business advice to local companies in an effort to 
help improve the dty's economic cUmate. From left, Scott Byrnes, manager of the Citizens 
Bank North Quincy ofBce; Joe Mannarino, executive director, Quincy 2000; Greg Glennon, 
commercial lending, Citizens Bank and Quincy 2000 committee mcmbcn and Ray DeSUva, 
vice president and regional manager of Citizens Bank. 



Julie McDonald Graduate 



Julie S. 
daughter of 



McDonald, Thomas F. McDonald of 
Karen and Quincy, graduated from 



Hartwick College in New 
York. 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

Victory Supermarkets, a 
family-owned food chain 
based in Leominster, will 
acquire the North Quincy 
Shaw's Supermarket within 
the next 30 days for an un- 
disclosed sum. 

Victory Supermarket 
president Arthur P. "Jay" 
DiGeronimo Jr., said he has 
not yet decided whether he 
will close the almost new 
supermarket on Hancock 
Street for renovations or 
keep it open and "put our 
personal touches on the 
store." 

Victory is acquiring five 
supermarkets as part of the 
Federal Trade Commis- 
sion's divestiture order it 
issued when it approved the 
$476 million sale of the Star 
Market chain to Shaw's 
Supermarkets' parent com- 
pany, J. Stainsbury pic of 
London. 

The only other nearby 




Conrad Wkks and Barry 
Armstrong, hosts 



Money Matters. 



Heard weekdays 9am to 1 1 am on 1 300am WJDA 

"Money Matters" features New England Advisory Group financial 
professionals Barry Armstrong and Conrad Wicks. Hear guests and 
experts from throughout the financial industry and call-in with your 
questions regarding mortgages, mutual funds, IRA's, stock tips or 
any financial issues affecting your life. 

BelnfMined. Be entertained. Be tuned bi. 



Thanks for listening. 



1300* WJDA 

South Shore Broadcasting Company 



POUTICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLmCAL ADVERTISEMENT 




^ave a ^H^ppif and Saje 4th oj ^utifl 

ELECT 




SHE'LL MAKE A DIFFERENCE 

^^fcrby^l^cCowBlit^ce^DefactM«mnnMa^^otly.l^phAlnc^.CalnpiiplM«Hlg^^.S^ 



Stores Victory is acquiring 
in the divestiture are the 
Star Market in Norwell and 
the Shaw's Supermarket in 
Norwood. 

DiGeronimo would not 
disclose the purchase price. 
Foodmaster Supermarkets 
of Somerville will acquire 
two markets, and three have 
yet to be divested. 

"One of the attractions 
lof acquiring Shaw's in 
North Quincy] is that it's a 
new 54,000-square-foot 
store," said DiGeronimo. He 
said the changes at the store 
would not affect the adja- 
cent Osco store. 

He said the North Quincy 
store would be modeled 
after the Kingston store, 
which Victory acquired 

when Stop and Shop pur- 
chased the Purity Supreme 
market chain and was re- 
quired to divest several 
stores. 

DiGeronimo said the 
new acquisitions should 
push up their annual sales 
volume from $275 million 
to $400 million, "but that 
pales to Shaw's acquisition 
which will push their vol- 
ume to $4 billion." 

DiGeronimo plans to 
introduce the same success- 
ful format used in Kingston, 
called Market Square at 
Victory, incorporating a 
coffee counter, a sushi bar, 
a sit-down area for fresh 
soups, salads, pizza, pasta 
and stir fry and placing all 
penshables in one aisle. 

Asked about providing 
new jobs, he said his com- 
pany "typically hires a 
higher percentage of full- 
timers than most other su- 
permarkets." The workers 
are not unionized, he said. 

Victory Supermarkets 
was founded in 1923 by two 
brothers, James and Louis 
DiGeronimo. James' sons, 
Arthur and James Jr., and 
Louis' son, Joseph, the sec- 
ond generation, are still ac- 
tively involved in the busi- 
ness. Jay DiGeronimo said 
he was the oldest among his 
three brothers and three 
cousins, all of whom are 
involved associated in the 
business, and there is a 
fourth generation coming 
along. 

Shaw's spokesman Ber- 



nard Rogan said Shaw's 
formally notified its em- 
ployees this week that 
Shaw's would be sold on or 
about July 17 as part of the 
deal to acquire the Star su- 
permarket chain. 

Meanwhile, Shaw's is 
committed to spending $70 
million in capital improve- 
ments at the various Star 

Markets it has acquired, 
including the one on Granite 
Street, said Rogan. 

However, he could not 
comment further about what 
changes would occur. 

"It's too early to discuss 
any plans," said Rogao. 
"Since last November 
[when Shaw's announced its 
acquisition plans], we could 
not go into the stores to sur- 
vey them." 

He said the Quincy Star 
Market had a great location 
and had room for expansion. 

As for the Quincy Ave- 
nue Shaw's Supermarket, 
Rogan said that is slated for 
closing by the end of the 
summer. That store, he said, 
was not considered as part 
of the divestiture require- 
ment because negotiations 
to sell the property were 
already under negotiations 
before Shaw's announced 
its acquisition plans. 

After the divestiture, 
Shaw's will own 46 Shaw's, 
41 Star Markets and four 
Wild Harvest stores, for a 
total of 91 supermarkets in 
Massachusetts. The pur- 
chase will strengthen 
Shaw's position as the sec- 
ond largest food retailer in 
New England, with 169 
stores throughout the six 
New England states and 
more than 32,000 associ- 
ates, of which 9,825 are 
full-time. 

In Massachusetts, the 
number of sales associates^ 
both full-time and part-time, 
total 19,002, of whom 9,002 
work for Shaw's. 

By comparison. Stop and 
Shop, the largest supermar- 
ket chain in New England, 
generated a total of $6.2 
billion in sales. 

The company has 196 
stores in Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut 
and New York and employs 

about 19,000 in Massachu- 
setts alone. 




FoottNotes 



by Dr. RkhardA Hacker 

Surgeott-Poittatrlst 
MORTON'S NEUROMA 



If you suffer from a fiery pain 
in the ball of your fool that often 
travels to your toes, you could have 
a Morton's neuroma, a swollen 
nerve between the metatarsal 
bones. Named after the U.S. sur- 
geon who first described it, T.G. 
Morton, the condition usually 
causes a specific, localized pain. It 
most often occurs between the diird 
and fourth toes. In severe cases, the 
toes b«x»ne numb. Pain usually 
subsides if you are barefoot and 
worsens with tight shoes. The sim- 
ptest treatment involves modifying 
your shoes, whidi dininisbes dK 
irritation and swdliog Momd the 
aervt. Anti-inflaamatory laedio- 
tioo or cortisone shots mqr abo be 
prescribed. If Ifaeae tfept fid to re- 
lieve the paia, SMfcry OHy be iK- 



ommended. 

If you suffer from sharp pain, 
numbness, or a burning feeling in 
your feet, a nerve condition may be 
the cause. These can result from 
wearing tight shoes, being on your 
fMt too long, or general medical 
conditions. Nerve conditimis can 
be hard to detect, Init here at 110 
We^ Squaotum St., No. Quincy, 
we're trained to identify them, re- 
lieve any pain they cause, and ax- 
rect them whenever possible. 
There's no need to suffer ... we 
can help. For an appointment, 
please caU 617-472-3466. 

FS. It is importata to wear 
shoes nMemmghwuUi in the 
of the ImU of the foot This 
keep the bones fixtm 



/ 




(I 



^^ 






New Parochial Vicar At St John's Church 



Thuraday, July 1,1999 Tl>» QuAnoy Sm> Page 13 



For Father William MuUin 
It's Like Coming Home 



By NANCY 
MANGANELLO 

For Fr. William Mullin 
being assigned a parochial 
vicar at St. John's Church 
was like coming home. 

"It's almost like a minor 
miracle that a clam digger 
from Houghs Neck made it 
to St. John's," he laughs. 

Fr. Mullin, who is 60, 
grew up in Houghs Neck 
and has been a priest for 34 
years. He assumed his new 
duties at St. John's June 1. 

He succeeds Fr. Richard 
Moran who left St. John's 
last June. Because of the 
shortage of priests it took a 
year to replace him. 

Fr. Mullin is outspoken 
on that shortage. He 
strongly believes in allow- 
ing married men to be or- 
dained to the priesthood. 

"Let's go back to that 
original practice," he said. 
"Ordaining married men. 
It's a church law that can be 
changed tomorrow." 

"There are parishes now 
that don't have masses 
during the weekdays be- 
cause they just don't have 
the priest power to do it," 
Fr. Mullin said. 

"We would have a 
whole new resource of 
priests. I am urging Cardi- 
nal Law to consider it seri- 
ously." 

Fr. Mullin also believes 
that women should have the 
right to be ordained but is 
skeptical about that hap- 
pening. 

"Married priests possi- 
bly," Fr. Mullin said about 
that likelihood. "Female 
priests I don't know. We'll 
have to keep praying about 
that." 

Fr. Mullin was also a 
strong early advocate of 
allowing girls to serve as 
acolytes which they now 
do. 

He is excited about his 




HOMECOMING •• Fr. WUUam Mullin, who .grew up in 
Houghs Neck, is happy to be back in Quincy as new 
parochial vicar at St John's Church. 

(Qmncy Sun PhotolNancy Manganelo) 
new assignment at St. during the desegregation, 
John's. be recalled, because they 

"It is very encouraging were poor and because of 
the way they celebrate the the color of their skin, 
liturgy here," Fr. Mullin "It was pretty scary to 

said. We have music at al- see all those armed police- 
most all liturgies which is men lined up along the 
good for me because I like streets to protect the kids," 
to sing. I'm not very good he said. 



at it, but I like to sing 

"They also have the 
reputation for being an ag- 
gressive parish here and 
that is encouraging." 

In addition to celebrat- 
ing mass, he will assist 
Rev. Peter Quinn with 
weddings and funeral 
masses. He is also inter- 
ested in Christian service 
work and social action. 

At his last Parish, St. 
Francis of Assisi in Brain- 
tree, he worked with several 
local churches to raise 
$55,000 and build a Habitat 
for Humanity home for a 
family in need. 

During the 1970's, Fr. 
Mullin served in Roxbury 
at St. Mary's church and St. 
Francis de Sales/St. 
Philip's. He remembers 
when Roxbury began to bus 
children to schools to give 
minorities an opportunity to 
get a better education. 
Many children suffered 



"If you really want to 
make a difference you got 
to go to the suburbs and try 
to get the suburban com- 
munities concerned about 
the poor," he said. 

He served at St. Robert's 
Church in Andover from 

1983-1987. While he was 
there, the church adopted a 
Cambodian family and 
welcomed them into the 
community. 

Fr. Mullin attended the 
Atherton Hough school. 
Central Junior High and 
Arch Bishop Williams High 
School while he grew up. 
He attended the Most 
Blessed Sacrament Church 
in Houghs Neck with his 
family. 

He went to Boston Col- \ 
lege for two years and then , 
transferred to St. John's 
Seminary where he spent 
six years. He was ordained 
at St. Ann's Church in 



\i 



• k 



Free checking 
with interest! 



• Tiered Interest — the 
more you have on 
deposit, the higher your 
rate* 

• NO maintenance fees 
whatsoever 

• NO charges for writing 
checks or making 
deposits 



toeBANKof 

LT'O^ itn^V «>e Soum Shore commun/ty since 18S5 



• FREE first order of checks 
for new accounts 

• Monthly statement 
shows all your 
transactions 

• overdraft protection, 
direct deposit service, 24- 
hour worldwide ATM 
access, and MasterMoney 
debit card all available 

'Annual PlercenUge rieM (APY1 for b^mxs from 

Sl,000tfiroughSl,999is2.02%. Forb^vcesof 

$2,000 or more. Itw APYit 3.04%. Con^Munded 

morMy APTisaccurMeasofiurKl. 1999 






^BCirrus 



Quincy on Feb. 9, 1965. 

His sister, Gerry, lives in 
Milton and works as a 
nurse. Fr. Mullin also has 
two brothers; Peter, an as- 
sistant US Attorney living 
in Milton and Patrick, a 
Colonel in the Marines in 
San Antonio, TX. 

Fr. Mullin says Quincy 
has changed since he last 
lived here. "(There is) quite 
a mix of Asians, Hispanics 
and blacks, which is all 
healthy and good." But his 
native Houghs Neck hasn't 
changed much. 

He said Hough's Neck 
was a close neighborhood 
and there are people still 
living there from back in 
his childhood. 

"I have a lot of good 
memories of Houghs 
Neck," Fr. Mullin said. 

Fr. Mullin plans to carry 
his good work over in 
Quincy for a long time. 

"Jesus said to help oth- 
ers and we're trying to 
carry that out," he said. 




A BLESSING OF the animab was hcM recently at United 
First Parish Church by Rev. Sbddon Bennett, minister. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Tom Gorman) 



3 Residents URI Graduates 

Three Quincy residents Biochemistry and 

recently graduated from Biophysics; John J. Flynn, 

University of Rhode Island. Library and Inf. Studies; 

The graduates and their „ .. , », « 

majors are the following: X*^°" }' McPartlin, 

Eric A. Dolinski, Community Planning. 



G J> Coddington^s 



FAMILY RESTAURANT (617) 472-9950 

Kitchen Under Neiv Management... Exciting Neiv Specials! 

Featuring . . . Pasta • Seafood • Chicken • Prime Rib 



20% OFF Your Entire Bill 



I 5-9pm Daily j 

I with this coupon. Excluding beverage, alcohol & tax. Gratuity based on full value. i 

One coupon per customer, not valid with other promotions or discounts. Exp. 7/31 /99 ' 

^m WMM* ^^^ ^^^ m^^ a^^ ^^^ ^mmb ^^^ ^^^ ^h^ m^^m ai^Ha <^^i« m^^m t^^m m^^m mmim ^m^ aa^v mtm^ ^m^m ^^am mbi^ ^amm ^^^ «J 

Outdoor Patio Dining in Historic Quinq/ Center 
Private Function Room Available FREE Validated Parking 

1250 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY CENTER 



Call About Our Move In Special 



•Z^iVER 'Bay Club 

4 

...a retirement community that won't cramp your 
style, your furniture or your pockethook. 



Who says moving to a retirement 
community means giving up 
space? At River Bay Club, you can 
select from a variety of spacious 
apartment plans. Every style is 
fully equipped with everything 
you need. There are no endow- 
ment fees, and the monthly rates 
are very affordable. 



Come see what you're missing at River Bay Club 
For more information or to schedule a personal tour please call: 

617-472-4457 

River Bay Club provides equal opportunities to all individuals 62 years of age or older. ^^^ 




Q Please send mc information on River Bay Qub 
Q Please contact me to arrange a personal tour 



Name: _ 
Address: 
aty: _ 



State: 



— Phone: _ 
_ Zip Code: 



gj^^ Mail to: River Bay Qub, 99 Brackctt Street, Quincy, MA 02 169 A 



Y 



Page 14 TlfQuinoy 



Thunday, July 1, 1999 




First Time Homebuyer's 
Workshop July 17 



Realtors Support Repeal Of 
Formaldehyde Disclosure Law 



Quincy Community Ac- 
tion Programs, Inc., a 
MHFA and HUD-approved 
First Time Homebuyer 
Counseling Agency, will 
hold a First Time Home- 
buyer's Workshop Saturday, 
July 17 at Battervmarch 



Park II, first floor cafeteria, 
Quincy. 

The one-day workshop 
will be held from 9 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Lunch will be 
served. 

Agenda will be compre- 
hensive and individualized. 




Winn lUiMHi^ orStllinii, iliuik. 




GUSCONFALONE 
Real Estate Consultant 



Annex Realty, Inc. 

49 Beak St, Quincy, MA 02170 
617472-4330 ext. 310 
Call Gus for a FREE 
Market Evaluation jm 
of your property I ^ 



Centtuiom 
Broker 



FIAVIN & FLAVIN 

Real Estate 




JOHN FLAVIN 

Serving the Real 

Estate Needs 

ofQuinqi 

Family Owned 
Since 1925 

617-479-1000 




\/W MOSOAKOiiU 

fswifyurvim 
mfessmn to (ml 

32S't3fZ 



WOLLASTON OFFICE 


Lynne Houghton, Manager _ 


Dave Andrews 


Carol Cahill 


Richard Colarusso 


Margie Duffy 


Sandra Fennelly 


Carolyn Flaherty 


Dan Goichman 


Mike Goodrich 


Corinne Getchell 


Melissa Higgins 


Beverly Joyce 


Ernie Light 


Dona Nightingale 


Patrick Mulkem 


Jaimie Paz 


Gloria Skolnick 


Donna Williams 


Osman Yesilcunen 


Give One of Vs a Call! 1 



Conway 



JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC.™ 

Call for a Free 

Market Analysis! 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

wwwjackconwayxom 



Focus will be on different 
aspects of the homebuying 
process, including locating a 
property within budget, 
making an offer, and deter- 
mining the best mortgage 
program. 

Advanced registration is 
required and space is lim- 
ited. Fee is $41 per house- 
hold ($5 per each additional 
household member to cover 
lunch costs). 

For more information 
and registration forms, con- 
tact Deborah Mullay at 
(617) 479-8181 ext. 172. 

The workshop is spon- 
sored by the City of Quincy, 
Department of Housing and 
Community Development, 
and Bank of America. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



The Massachusetts Asso- 
ciation of Realtors® (MAR) 
has expressed support for 
legislation that would repeal 
the commonwealth's Urea 
Formaldehyde Foam Insu- 
lation (UFFI) disclosure 
law. 

In recent testimony be- 
fore the legislature's Joint 
Committee on Health Care, 
MAR officials called the 
existing statute an outdated 
and unnecessary require- 
ment on the state's home- 
owners, and urged lawmak- 
ers to eliminate mandated 
UFFI disclosure since the 
shaving cream-like insulat- 
ing product has not been 
used in residential applica- 
tions in the U.S. for nearly 
two decades. 

Under current law, resi- 
dential property owners in 
Massachusetts are obligated 
to investigate for and dis- 



close the use of UFFI in the 
home to real estate agents 
and prospective buyers, re- 
gardless of their age, expe- 
rience or familiarity with the 
product. The statute was 
enacted in 1986, at a time 
when public concern over 
UFFI was at a peak due to 
scientific research that 
showed the formaldehyde 
found in the product was 
responsible for emitting 
potentially harmful vapors 
into homes. 

"The disclosure require- 
ment seemed appropriate at 
the time it was passed," said 
MAR President James 
Dougherty, "but studies 
conducted in later years 
have revealed that this 
product no longer poses a 
public health threat." In fact, 
extensive government test- 
ing has determined that 

formaldehyde levels pro- 



duced by UFFI typically 
return to ambient house lev- 
els within several days of 
the form insulation being 
applied. 

"Since the sale of UFFI 
was banned in 1982, and 
few, if any homes have been 
found to contain dangerous 
levels of formaldehyde gas 
in many ways, we believe 
there is no longer a need to 
require a disclosure that the 
passing of time has for all 
intents and purposes cured," 
MAR Chief Executive Offi- 
cer Robert Nash said. 

While encouraging the 
repeal of the only UFFI dis- 
closure law in the country, 
the MAR remains fully sup- 
portive of the prohibition 
against the sale of UFFI as 
an insulating material, as 
well as the disclosure of 
material defects in all prop- 
erty for sale, Nash added. 



Builders Licensing Course Begins July 12 



mmL 





Buying Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFariand 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 328-3200 



The Builders Association 
of Greater Boston an- 
nounces the next builders 
licensing course will begin 
Monday, July 12 at its 



PMI - CONE 



Licensed 

Appraiser will 

remove your 

PML 

Call Art Foley 

at Century 21 

Annex 

472-4330 



Quincy headquarters in 
Crown Colony Office Park, 
700 Congress St., Quincy. 

Classes will be held each 
Monday from 7 to 10 p.m. 
and continue for seven 
weeks. 

The next state exam is 
Sept. 11. Deadline to regis- 
ter for the exam is Aug. 11. 
Contact the Board of 



Quincy Residents 

Are Interested in 

Quincy Real Estate. 

List Yours Here, 



Building Regulations & 
Standards at (617) 727-7532 
for license eligibility re- 
quirements. 

BAGB has been recom- 
mended by many building 
inspectors and other profes- 
sionals as a source of review 
of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code Book and 
preparation for the MA 
Construction Supervisors 
Licensing Exam. The course 
is a review of the sixth edi- 
tion code. 

Interested builders and 
remodelers should call (617) 
773-6004 or (617) 773-1300 
for registration iniformation. 



-CENTURY 21- 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Acron flron BtsckbnstM' & Qniicy T 



v»« 



■.■^ •'^ 



kS] 

STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squ^ntum, MA 02 1 7 1 

[ftai (617) 328-9400 ^ 



A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 




^^m^ 



QUINCY 
EipandaUe cape oa west ride. Nkdy bndscapcd lot with 
priTirtcKu-yanLCheck<MttiiiK2bcdrooaiMK«.$199,9M. 




Century 21 sells a house every miiute. 

Wben you're «1 JM on do dungs othen cai't 

See all our Ustiiigi at: wwwx21— ncixoni 



Complete Real Estate Service 
Since 1926 

Committed To Property Ownership 

SALES • RENTALS 

APPRAISALS 

FREE Pm CONSULTATION 

YOU MAY NOT NEED PM!!! 




'nwiday, Jaly 1, 1999 TIm Qula«7 



IS 



Take a Look at These 








QUINCY 

Great visibility for your 
business! 1600 SF reUil 

storefront along Route 3A. 

Business B Zoned. Located 

along M BTA bus route. 

OfTerad at $219,900 

or lease at $2,200/mooUi 




QUiNCY 

Former restaurant just off of 

Hancock St. in N. Quincy. 2 

levels, 8.800 SF. 10.995 SF 

lot includes lot directly 

across street. Business B 

zoned. 

Offorad at $695,000 




NORTH QUINCY 

Hancock Street retail 
opportunity in great car and 
foot traffic area. 3,630 SF in 
first floor and basement. On- 
site parking. Business B 
zoned 
Offered at $349,000 




QUINCY CENTER 

Hancock Street Class A 
office space for lease. 2,600 

SF±, beautiful conference 

room, spacious bullpen area, 

convenient access by car or 

train, adjacent to municipal 

parking garage. 

For Lease at $14^/SF 



1 




■ il.Ji^ 


^afa'i3^-. , j«^.... 



QUINCY 

Retail store with open floor 

plan, 3000 SF first floor 
space with additional 3000 

SF basement. Bustling 

Quincy Ave. location close 

to major several retailers, 

134 feet of frontage. 

OfTered at $475,000 





QUINCY 

One-story brick office/ 

warehouse building. 

Business A zoned. 

6.641 SF gross building 

area. 9.826 SF site. Ample 

parking. 

Reduced to $235,000 




QUINCY CENTER 

Great downtown storefronts. 

3 commercial/retail condos. 
Ranging in size from 865- 
891 SR Just a short walk 
from parking facilities. 
Offered at $79,000 each 
or Combine for a Great 

Development Opportunity 



^t*:^k >.^ 



^«>i.fc, '.y*B^ip,' 



^ e si de n t i a I R e a T E s t a i e 

% 

m 

Thinking about selling? Now's the time! Take advantage of this great 

offer. List your home with Flynn & Co. and get $500 back at the closing. 

It's like getting your own commission! Call 617-328-0600 today! 



List your home with 
Flynn & Co. 
and get $500 
cash back! 



-#• 



$500 



Offer expires 8/31/99 




Call 617-328-0600 




t 



Present this coupon i 

at your closing j 

and get a $500 rebate! | 



J*r 




Aaniel J. 

lynn & €o^ Ine. 

V/ Check oirtovwclMitealwwwJUFLirNiicoM 



COMMERCIAL 


RESIDENTIAL 


SALES 


REAL ESTATE 


AND LEASING 


37 BUliQgs Road 


32 Chestnut Street 


Quincy. MA 02171 


Quincy, MA 02169 


td 617328.0600 


td 617.479.9000 


bx 617.328.3871 


flu 617.770.0443 





■■■ 



Page 16 TlM Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



SCTM4MMi4to 





Cancer New Cases, Deaths Expected To Fall This Year 



Fewer Americans will 
die of cancer this year in the 
U.S. than last year, accord- 
ing to the American Cancer 
Society's newly-released 
1999 Cancer Facts and 
Figures, a publication which 
tracks trends in cancer diag- 
noses and deaths. 

Approximately 563,100 
deaths are expected to occur 
in the U.S. in 1999, down 
from the 1998 estimate of 
564,800. In Massachusetts, 
14,200 deaths are expected. 

The cancer incidence rate 
" the rate at which new 
cancer cases occur - is also 
expected to decline. Na- 
tionally, an estimated 
1,221,800 cases are ex- 



pected to be diagnosed in 
1999, compared with 
1,228.600 in 1998. In Mas- 
sachusetts, 30,700 cases are 
expected this year, com- 
pared to 31 ,500 in 1998. 

Both drops are indicative 
of hopeful trends which 
began in the earlier part of 
the decade, and are attrib- 
uted to the cumulative ef- 
fects of factors like quitting 
smoking, checkups to find 
cancer in its earlier stages, 
and improved treatments. 
During 1990-1995, the can- 
cer incidence rate decreased 
on average 0.7 percent per 
year and cancer death rates 
decreased 0.5 percent per 




year. The cancers which 
decreased in incidence were 
those of the lung (males 
only), prostate, co- 
lon/rectum, urinary bladder 
and leukemia. Death rates 
declined in female breast, 
prostate, colon/rectum for 
both men and women and 
lung cancers among men. 

"We're encouraged by 
the progress we're begin- 
ning to see in the fight 
against cancer," said Dr. 
Charles McDonald, national 
president of the ACS. "I am 
optimistic that these trends 
will continue. Without even 
one more discovery in the 
lab, so many of this year's 
cancer cases and deaths can 
be prevented, if we simply 
put into practice those 
things we already know can 



save lives, like quitting 
smoking and making health 
choices each day." 

While cancer affects 
millions every year, the sur- 
vival rate is increasing 
steadily. The relative five- 
year survival rate for cancer 
now stands at 60 percent - 
up from 58 percent last year, 
and 41 percent in the early 
1980s. 

Lung Cancer remains the 
number one cause of cancer 
death in the United States. 
Although mortality rates in 
men have been decreasing, 
largely due to their de- 
creased smoking rates, those 
in women are still increas- 
ing. However, since the na- 
tional prevalence of current 
cigarette smoking among 
high school students was 32 



percent high in 1997 than in 
1991, mortality rates for 
both sexes are expected to 
climb. 

"Tobacco use among 
youth remains one of our 

biggest health problems," 
McDonald said. 

"Nationally, 3,000 children 
begin smoking each day, 
with as few as four ciga- 
rettes enough to addict a 
young child. As adults, they 
develop cancer and heart 
disease and die an average 
of 15 years prematurely." 

After lung cancer, inva- 
sive breast cancer is the 
second major cause of can- 
cer death in women, with 
175,000 new cases ex- 
pected. Fortunately, early 
detection and improved 



treatment have resulted in a 
significant decline in mor- 
tality rates, especially in 
younger women. 

Numbers listed in Can- 
cer Fact and Figures are 
estimates, based on actual 
data for 1979-1995. For 
more information, on cancer 
statistics call 1-800-ACS- 
2345. 

The American Cancer 
Society is the nationwide 
community-based voluntary 
health organization dedi- 
cated to eliminating cancer 
as a major health problem 
by preventing cancer, saving 
lives and diminishing suf- 
fering from cancer, through 
research, education, advo- 
cacy and service. 



Smoking Cessation Programs Tax-Deductible 



Dana Smith, D.P.M. and George J. Ducach, D.P.M 
Surgeons-Podiatrists 

CORNS AND CALLUSES 

One of the most common pumice stone can be used for 
conditions we see as podiatrists very mild calluses, but very of- 
are corns and calluses. Corns ten it is necessary to see a po- 
and calluses are actually your diatrist for treatment due to the 
body's way of protecting you. severity of the corns and cal- 
Because of increased pressure luses. 
or friction, the body responds If you arc experiencing 
by producing layers of dead symptoms from corns or cal- 
skin cells, therefore producing luses, see a podiatrist to fmd out 
corns and calluses. the treatment options available 

Corns tend to occur on toes to you. 
and the lesions are more dis- If you are having any foot 
Crete in size, whereas calluses problems, call and schedule an 
are more diffuse. Changing appointment at 773-4300. We 
shoe gear can often give some are located at 1261 Furnace 
relief from the symptoms, al- Brook Parkway, Suite #18, 
though they do not usually pre- Quincy, and are affiliated with 
vent the lesions from occurring. Carney, Quincy and South 

Self care in the form of a Shore Hospitals. 



The Internal Revenue 
Seivice has added another 
benefit to the value of 
programs to help people 
stop smoking: the cost of 
these programs counts as a 
medical expense for 
taxpayers who itemize 
deductions. 

Citing reports of the 
Surgeon General from 
1988 to 1996, the IRS 
noted that scientific 
evidence has established 



that nicotine is addictive 
and that smoking is 

detrimental to a smoker's 
health. In light of this, the 
IRS revoked a 1979 ruling 
and said that taxpayers 
may count the unre- 
imbursed costs of smoking- 
cessation programs as 

deductible medical ex- 
penses, even though they 
have no specific ailment 
or disease. 



Quit 


WE'RE EIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 


Smoking. 


American Heart fn 
AssodationJ^^ 



Taxpayers may also 
deduct expenses for 
prescription drugs designed 
to alleviate nicotine 
withdrawal. However, the 
tax law does not allow a 
deduction for over-the- 
counter medications, such 
as non-prescription nico- 
tine patches and gi'm The 
law also lini! the 
itemized deducti i for 
unreimbursed medical ex- 
penses to the amount by 
which these expenses 
exceed 7 1/2 percent of 
adjusted gross income. 

"Taxpayers who paid for 
smoking-cessation pro- 
grams in recent years may 
get a refund by filing an 
amended tax return," said 
IRS District Director Steve 
Daige. ."Those who 



already had enough 
medical expenses to 
deduct them should amend 
their returns to include the 
smoking program costs." 

Other taxpayers should 
check their returns to see 
if these added expenses 
would give them enough 
medical expenses to 
itemize. A person may 
generally file an amended 
return on Form 1040X until 
three years from the due 
date of the original return. 
"Taxpayers who have 
questions on claiming 
medical expenses or 
amending their tax returns 
can call the IRS toll-free 
tax assistance phone line 
at 1-800-829-1040, 24 
hours a day, seven days a 
week," added Daige. 



Children Adults 

Teens l-'l* r^ Families 

Robert Azrak, Ed.D., FjV.Co.P. 

Licensed Psychologist 

Mass Bay Counseling, 1 Billings Rd., North Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 
www.inergy.com/RAzrakPsychoIogy 



MAGNETIC THERAPY 

BREAKTHROUGH HEAITH 
TECHHOLOGIES 

For Information 
Call Pete or Jo 61 7-471-1 526 

LOCAL DISTRIBUTORSHIPS AVAILABLE 




NEW WEIGHT LOSS MEDICATION 

XENICAL^ 

Call for information or 
to schedule an appointment. 



covered by some insurances 




Located in the Granite Plaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Granite Street. Bralntree. MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVID 8. EGH^MAN, MP, MPH, BIEDICAL DIRECTOR 



A^s you At Rfs^ 

fOR iVMe O/SSASS? 

LYMErlx™ 

Lyme Disease Vaccine 

Now Available at 



Covered by most Insurances 




Located in the Granite Plaza 
neact to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Granite Street, Bnintree, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVID 8. BOILMAN, MD, MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



Thunday, July 1,1999 Tli« Qulaogr 0ua Pli(el7 



♦■«- 



Spci^ts 



Quincy Native Taken 32nd By 
Stanley Cup Champ Dallas Stars 

NHL-Draft Pick Ryan 
Follows His Own Script 



By CHRIS POISSON 

When he was in sixth 
grade, Michael Ryan had a 
dream like most youngsters 
- he wanted to play profes- 
sional hockey. 

And in an essay he wrote 
for english class, he mapped 
out the route he was going 
to travel to reach his goal. 
First stop was to attend 
Catholic Memorial, a school 
known to breed hockey tal- 
ent. Then he would move on 
to Boston University and 
don the scarlet and white for 
legendary coach Jack 
Parker. Finally, he would be 
drafted in the third round by 
the NHL's Detroit Red- 
wings. 

Well, it's time to see how 




MKERYAN 

1999 NHL Draft Pick 

sergeant. "He got a kick out 
of it. 

"In the back of his mind 
I guess he had that goal. 



was important in terms of 
college and getting a schol- 
arship. After that worked 
out, I knew that going into 
my senior year the NHL 
was defmitely going to be 
watching." 

Before his Hnal year at 
BC High, the Central 
Scouting Bureau, which 
rates draft eligible pros- 
pects, had Ryan as the 99th 
best North Ajnerican skater. 
By season's end, he cata- 
pulted to No. 38. 

"To tell you the truth, I 
didn't look at the ratings a 
lot, which I think helped me 
the most," says Ryan. "I 
didn't get caught up in 
where I was or where I 




Fortunately he fulfilled it. thought I should've been. I 

just put that aside and kept 
playing." 

And the center played his' 



Ryan's master plan panned He's on the right tracL 

out. Instead of going to CM, "I don't really remember 

he played at Boston College writing that. It might have 

High School. Rather than been my little brother. I 

lacing it up for the Terriers, don't know," says Ryan, as 

he'll be skating for North- he starts to laugh. 

eastern University this fall. ' Although Ryan had 

And last Saturday at the dreams of being an NHLer, ^•"*'' ^•'«^*^ ^^ "*«*> •*>**♦ 

NHL's entry draft at the h^ j^^^„ really thought of it >ron'ca"y. *<> Catholic Me- 

FleetCenter, the 19-year-old ^^ ^ possibility until his ™«"»*- ,., , . 

Milton resident, and Quincy senior vear at BC Hieh. '^X*" didn't play well m 

native, was selected No. 32 



heart out, carrying his team 
with a separated shoulder 
through the tournament to 
the state Super 8 hockey 



CHRIS BREGOU, a 1999 graduate of North Quiocy High School, recenUy signed a letter of 
iatent with Bryant College where the high school athletic standout will play basebaH. With 
the tabic is his fkthcr, Paul BregolL Looking on (standfaig from left) arc Michad Hurley, 
North Qnhicy High School Assistant Principal; Peter Chrisom, Jr., Dean of Students; and 
NQHS Prindpnl EOeen Fccncy. 

Morrisette Hopes 

Win Over Weymouth 

Boosts Confidence 



senior year at BC High, 
where he racked up 20 goals 

by the Stanley Cup cham- ^n^ 24 assists in 21 games. 

pion Dallas Stars. In jy^j ^ng yg^r, Ryan had 

"He did that essay m gone from just trying to get 

sixth grade and I recall it ^^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^ to 

because I was over talking becoming a top NHL pros- 

to Jack Parker when he was ^^ 

being recruited and I was u\ ^^^^^ ^^^ior year 

telling him about it, says ^^^ ■ ^^ ^ important," 

John Ryan, a Quincy police ^ .^ j^nio, 



the loss, but the NHL scouts 
noticed the gritty effort 



From the poor fielding, 
wild pitching and weak 
clutch hitting to a failed 
sprinkler system, things just 

raadrby the sV^LCm- ^^"'^ ^^^ *° ^ '*'®^*"8 * ^O"™" i^^ ^'^^ ^^e bases 
ndkid ^°' Morrisette so far this loaded and Billy Walker 

"It was a minor shoulder ^^f"' .,^ chipped in with a pair of hits 

separation and I didn't think , ^fter four straight heart- 

breaking one-run losses. 




LEGION BASEBALL 



With five of the nine 
teams in the division mak- 
ing the playoffs, Cattaneo 
to lead the attack. feels his team still has a 



it was going to hurt my "--V"» 71%'"" rrA " !"*' u f?*^ '^'" ''*" '««'^""*^^ '*»°^ *^ ^^^ P^"^' 

chances." says Ryan. "My Momsette (3-7) embarked cause they had beaten us in season, 

teammates didn't really «"/ five-game stretch and the first game by one run," "We're striving to get 

u-j — «-^ ,-.o..we «c .« 5aid manager Ray Cattaneo. into the playoffs right now. 



(Cont'd On Page 19) 



Summer Swimming Schedule 
At Lincoln-Hancock Pool 

Recreation Director Family Swim: Monday 7:45 p.m. 

Barry Welch announces that through Friday; 6-6:50 p.m.; Adult Swim: Monday 

the Lincoln Hancock Pool Monday, Wednesday, Fri- through Friday; 7:55-8:45 

will reopen with it's sum- day; 7-7:45 p.m.; Saturday p.m.; Saturday and Sunday; 

mer schedule on Tuesday and Sunday; 1:55-2:45 p.m. 

evening, July 6. Senior Swim: Tuesday 

The schedule: and Thursday; 7-7:45 p.m.; 

Youth Swim: Monday Saturday and Sunday; 2:55- 

through Friday; 5-5:50 p.m.; 3:45 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday; 1- Lifeguard Training: 

1:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 7- 



3:55-4:45 p.m. 

For more information 
call the Recreation Office at 
376-1395. 



had mixed results as it 
picked up two wins. Its last 
game, a. 9-7 win over sec- 
ond-place Weymouth at 
Libby Field Monday night, 
might be a confidence 
booster, however. 

Chris Bregoli, in his first 
start of the season, pitched 
five innings and left with a 
9-6 lead. He picked up the 
win when Matt McCann 
shut Weymouth down over 
the final two innings. 

Adam Goodrich stroked 
two doubles, cme which was 



" I think the four losses by said Cattaneo. "If we can 

one run kind of got us a lit- get in there, I think we can 
tie discouraged. It brought ^confd On Page 19) 

the kids down a little bit." 




PRESIDENTS" LADIES 


GOLF-ASSOCIATION 


FOUR 4 
Qj^lSiQIU 


;LUB-JUNE26 

NET 

1 . 65 - 1 i7 Harrington 

2. 66 - Sue Coleman 

3. 68 - Lynn McGotff, Julie Rossi 

NET 

1.68- Pat Walsfi 

2. 70 • Chns Fitzpatrick 

3. 72 - Marian Coivoy 

Karen Ryan 
5. 73 -Pat Hagan 
DMSIONM 
NET 
1 . 67 - Barbara Robertson 

2. 73 - Elaine Mooney 

Caroline MagRo 
4.75-GigiSzakeiy 
5.77-PatChiavw«l 

Ol^fiiONiY 

NET 

1.68-PaulansLla 

Z 70- Nancy DICar1o(Sr.) 

3.72-tjoraltBOIve 


GROSS 

1.74-KerriMcGlynn 
2. 75 - Melanie Curtin 
3. 77 - Margaret Murphy 


GROSS 

1.85- Celeste Maloney 

2.89-CathyTurpel 

DIVISION in 


GROSS 

1.94- Ruth Jacobson 

nMSlOMIV 
GROSS 
1.96- Dot VBlcot 



Early Sports Deadline 
For Next Week's Sun 



Because of Indepen- 
dence Day being observed 
on Monday, July 5 there 
will be an early ^wrts dead- 
line for next week's Quincy 
Sun. 

All sports releases, in- 
cluding youth sports and 



advertising for the sports 
section, should be in The 
Sun office, 1372 Hancock 
St., by tomorrow (Friday) 
noon for publication in next 
week's Sun. 

Thank you for your co- 
operation. 



-PROPANE 

Williams Coal & Oil Company 

'Since IQir 

A fulsenn(» Plumbing, tMingSi At Con(Mo(W)g Co. 
^SPECIAL OFFER 

$1.00 Off A Fill Up With this ad 

781-643-0415 

39Adwma.Bralntr8e Open7dayt,7MI-7PM 



by Tony Cantorino, Ktvin McGroarty and Bill Storfcit 

BEGINNING TO FADE? 

Contaminated bral(e fluid is one LEO & WALTS SUNOCO 

of the most overtool(ed (and pre- shouldlMyourfiilsefviceai^care 

ventat)le) causes of bralce fade. It is centerformc^everysysteminyour 

unportant, therefore, to flush and car. If you need us to look at any 

re^ace the txake fluid, typicaflyev- system in your car or tmck, indud- 

erytwoyearsor3O,000miles.Why? Ing you brdke system, our ASE 

Conventional glycol-based brake Certified servwe technicians have 

fluk)at)sort)s water, ther^ helping the skiHs to handle it. You'll find us 

to prevent condensation from cor- located at 258 Quincy Ave., E. 

ro<«ng the brake system. When the Braintree (781 -843-1 550). Hours: 

brakeflukJeventuallyabsortJsallthe Mon.-Fri.6am-9pm,Sat.7am-9pm, 

moisture that it can hokJ. problems Sun. 9am-5p^. Sunoco and most 

arise. Unabsorbed moisture can be- major credit cards honored. Count 

gin to collect in the system to cor- on us for propane for grills, motor 

rode braking components, or to homes, and converted vehkdes. We 

cause seals to swell and deteriorate, are 'A Place Where Your Car Can 

In additwn, the boiling point of the Live Longer." 

fkjkJdropsbetowrecommendedlev- HINT: SHicone-based DOT 5 

els,meaningitwilboNsoonerunder brake Huid is not compatible with 

hard brddng condions to reduce either DOT 3 or DOT 4 and shoM 

perfoonance. FKoNng the brake never be used to top (^ systems 

system helps avoid these problems, that use DOT 3 or DOT 4. 

PMPMfi By 7k£ fiowo 

No flat rwt», you get what you pay fori 

(Leo & WaN% Sunooo ABK Propan*. Inc.) 



i^::^! 
^^^ 



iMa,Mt;sSwoM 

(781)843^1550 



i 



%Mi 



I 



Page 18 Til* QuinosT Sun Thanday, JhIj 1, 199f 



Three Quincy Boys Lead 
Archie Jvs To 9-6 Season 



First-Place WoIIaston 
Runs Record To 10-0 



Three local ballplayers 
have just completed a very 
successful season for the 
Archbishop Williams Junior 
Varsity baseball team. 

Williams, which finished 
the season with a 9-6 record, 
was led by 16-year-old 
sophomore catcher Mark 
Gibbons, and a pair of 15- 
year-old freshmen: 
pitcher/first baseman Patrick 
Jaehnig and third baseman 
Patrick Duff. 

Gibbons provided tre- 
mendous leadership for a 
young JV squad from his 
catching position and batted 
.315. 

His most outstanding 
performance came at Austin 
Prep when he was 2-for-3 



with the game-winning RBI 
while throwing out two base 
runners in a 7-4 Williams 
victory. 

He is currently playing 
summer ball for the Quincy 
Legion. 

Jaehnig fmished the year 
with a 4-0 record to lead the 
Archies' pfitching staff. He 
also batted .410 and was 
second on the team in home 
runs and RBIs. 

He had his best day 
against afch-rival Bishop 
Fenwick at home. He 
blasted two long homers and 
a sacrifice fly good for 
seven RBIs. His sixth inning 
grand slam erased a three 
run Fenwick lead and 
sparked Williams on the an 



exciting 11-10 comeback 
victory. 

Jaehnig plays summer 
ball for the Sons of Italy in 
the Babe Ruth League. 

Duff was a solid defen- 
sive third baseman/left 
fielder who finished the 
season batting .300. 

He saved his best for last 
as he knocked in the win- 
ning run to give Archies a 5- 
4 win over Duxbury in the 
last inning of the last game. 
He made several excellent 
defensive plays at third base 
as well. 

He is playing for Golden 
Print in the Babe Ruth 
League this summer. 



Donovan Leads Kiwanis; 
Thorley Fans 14 In 2-Hitter 



Dewey Donovan pitched 
a six-hitter, collected three 
hits and three runs batted in 
as Kiwanis chalked up its 
eighth win of the Junior 
League season, 10-4, over 
Keohanes. 

Andy Patton had a dou- 
ble and a single and Mike 
Mahoney, Mike Garland 
and Dennis Layden each 
had two hits. Matt Breslin, 
Mike MtPherson and Nick 
Falbo had one apiece. 

The defensive play for 
the game was made by 
Donovan, who grabbed a 
viscious line drive hit right 
at him on the mound. 

The shortstop-second 
base combination of Breslin 
and McPherson was out- 
standing and Teddy Finne- 
gan played a great game in 
left field. 

John Pelletier pitched 
well for Keohanes but was 
let down by defensive lapses 
behind him. 

Mark Kisiel and Marty 
Rogers had two hits apiece 
for Keohanes. 
Burgin-Platner-Huiiey 9 
Beacon Sports 3 

Justin Thorley pitched a 
two-hitter and struck out 14 
en route to his eighth vie- 



JUNIOR LEAGUE 



First-place WoIIaston ran 
its record to 10-0 with five 
wins in recent South Shore 
Senior Babe Ruth action. 

Brian Deptula (3-0, 1 
save, 0.51 ERA), Paul 
Markarian (.500 avg., .985 
fielding percentage) and 
Frank McNamara (.350 
avg.) have led WoIIaston to 
its undefeated start. 

WoIIaston - 7 
Weymouth • 

Matt Reggiannini picked 
up the win as he struck out 
six and walked two. Relief 
pitcher T.J. Bell closed the 
door by striking out he side 
in the seventh inning. 

Chad Fitzpatrick went 2 
for 4 with a triple, two RBIs 
and a run scored, and Mike 
McCarthy went 1 for 2 with 
an RBI and a stolen base. 
Dave Centrella swiped three 
bases 

Brian Radell made two 
run-saving plays in the sixth 
inning. 



BABE RUTH 



-% 



WoIIaston • 3 
Stoughton - 

Ace pitcher Brian Dep- 
tula dominated from the hill, 
farming 1 1 batters in the win 

Frank McNamara went 2 
for 2 with a triple, an RBI 
and a run scored, and T.J. 
Bell had a triple and an RBI. 
WoIIaston - 6 
Hyde Park -3 

Paul Markarian went 2 
for 2 with a triple and a 
home run and Billy O Toole 
went 2 for 3 with two stolen 
bases and an RBI. 

Frank McNamara 
smashed a triple and made 
three outstanding defensive 
plays to prevent runs from 
scoring. 
WoIIaston • 6 
Hingham - 4 

Matt Reggiannini picked 
up the win with some relief 
help from Mike McCarthy. 



Paul Markarian went 3 
for 3 with two RBIs, two 
runs scored and four stolen 
bases. Brian Deptula went 2 
for 3 with a double, two 
RBIs and two stolen bases. 

Dave Centrella shined in 
lefr field with several spar- 
kling grabs, including a 
diving catch to take runs 
away from Hingham. 
WoIIaston • 8 
Jamaica Plain • 4 

Patrick Dolbeare struck 
out 10 in the win and went 2 
for 4 with a stolen base and 
run scored. 

Billy OToole (3 hits). 
Matt Reggiannini (2 hits) 
and Brian Deptula (triple) 
helped with the offensive 
load. 

Deptula and Mike 
McCarthy had their gloves 
working in the field. 



Elks' Ham Hurls Perfect Game 



tory of the season, 

Bobby Newcomb had a 
single, a double and a triple 
and Pat Malone had a single 
and two doubles. 

Mike Powers, Tony 
Pepdjonovic and Jimmy 
Fitzpatrick also has doubles 
and Anthony Gilbody con- 
tributed a triple. 
Colonial Federal 8 
Quincy Police 5 

Raymond Marchand 
slugged a double, triple and 
home run, driving in four 
runs and John Santon struck 
out eight in three innings in 
the victory. 

Chris Rooney fanned one 
and Dan Reggiannini four in 
relief. 

Ted Fawell went the six 
inning distance for the Po- 
lice, striking out 10. 

Reggiannini had a double 
and triple. Matt Giordani 
and Jeff Green had two-base 
hits and Santon and Nick 
Malvesti singles. 

Runs were driven in by 
Dan Scribi, Mike Giordano, 
Marchand, Reggiannini, 
Santon and Green. 



Mike Gicrdani and Rob 
DeAngelis had good defen- 
sive games in the field for 
Colonial Federal. 

Corey Wynne was the 
big gun at the plate for the 
Police with a double and a 
triple. 

Billy Glennon added two 
singles and a RBVI while 
Kevin Richardson singled 
and played a fine defensive 
game as his team's catcher. 

A towering Hrst-inning 
grand slam by Ted Fawell 
got the offense rolling for 
Quincy Police in their 8-4 
victory of the Elks at 
McCoy Field in recent Jun- 
ior League action. 

The visiting Elks took a 
two-run lead in the top of 
the first on a home run by 
Rick Shifone, but Fawell 
regained his composure and 
struck out 12 in the win. 

Kevin Bossart (double) 
and Kevin Richardson 
(triple) added extra base hits 
for Police. Brendan Mul- 
cahy raised his average by 
going 2-for-3. 



The Quincy Babe Ruth 
Playoffs have begun and 
one team, the Elks, have 
been perfect. 

The Elks won their first 
two games with out allow- 
ing a run, and pitcher Chris 
Ham tossed a perfect game 
in one of the wins. 

The Elks - 10 
SonsofItoly-0 

Chris Ham is Mr. Perfect 



from the rubber. He domi- 
nated opposing batters, as 
he struck out 18 of a possi- 
ble 21 hitters. The other 
three hit inHeld outs. 

Brian G'Hanely provided 
all the offense, going 3 for 3 
with four RBIs. 
The Elks -7 
Hough's Neck - 

Brian O'Hanly almost 
had himself a perfect game 
as he allowed just two hits 



and walked none in the 
complete-game win. 

O'Hanly also did the job 
offensively by stroking two 
doubles. 

Justin Hall had three hits 
(two doubles) and three 
RBIs, Chris Ham also had 
three hits and Dan Duggan 
chipped in with two. 

Mike Feetham had 
Hough's Neck only hits in 
the game. 



Local 2222 Wins 3 



Beaton Triple In Finale Gives 
White Sox Win In St. John's Loop 



Steve Kussman slammed 
a home run and a double as 
the American League 
drubbed the National 
League, 18-2, in the St. 
John's Farm League all star 
game. 

Kussman and Sean Kay- 
lalis of the White Sox held 
the Nationals scoreless 
during their stint of pitch- 
ing. 

White Sox MVP, catcher 
Johnny Sullivan, added a 
solid hit and did a fine job 



ST. JOHN'S FARM 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



behind the plate 

Mike Ramponi and 
Kevin Tryon also reached 
base and scored for the 
Americans. 
White Sox 12 
Orioles 9 

Kussman hit a pair of 
homers as the White Sox 
rallied for Hve runs in their 
last at bat to defeat the Ori- 
oles and Hnish the season 
with a fine 13-2 record. 

Christopher Civitarese 
also had a round tripper fw 
the White Sox (sponsored 
by S. Matarazzo Dentistry). 

In the final iiming, Kayla 
McGonagle drew a walk 
wiuth the bases loaded to tie 
the game at 9-9 and setting 
the stage for Andrew Bea- 
tcMi's triple that drove in the 



wirming run plus two extras. 
Kussman then blanked 
the Orioles (sponsored by 
Nation One Mortgage) in 
the top of the sixth to insure 
the victory. Kussman also 
turned a line shot to Hrst 
base into a triple play in the 
third inning. 

Kaylalis chipped in a 
double and some strong 
pitching. Ramponi reached 
base and scored three times. 
Tryon doubled and Zac 
Tucker had an RBI and 
scored a run. 

Jennifer Grimmel 
cracked a solid base hit and 
Sullivan reached base twice 
with a hit and a run scored. 

James Triglia and Dcmny 
Jackson contributed with 
excellent defense. 



Local 2222 reeled off 
three straight wins to close 
out the season and earn a 
spot in the Triple AAA 
playoffs in recent Quincy 
Youth Baseball action. It 
finished the season 9-8-1 
afler a dreadful 2-5 start. 
Local 2222- 10 
Kenny's Lock • 5 

Robbie Gardiner and 
Alex Tringale provided the 
timely hitting as they both 
had two hits and two runs 
scored. 

Corey Lumaghini played 
well behind the plate and 
Paul Farina picked up the 
win. 

For Kenny's Lock, Jake 
Smith stroked a triple and 
Danny Owens and Dennis 
Rack both had a hit and run 
scored. 

Local 2222 - 11 
Kenny's Lock • 

Todd Schofield tossed a 
no-hitter the following night 
with 13 punchouts and 
launched a Mark McGwire- 
type home run over the left- 




field fence. 

Robbie Gardiner had two 
hits and played great de- 
fense at first base. Dennis 
Dilon also had a strong 
game. 

Dan Ivy, Jim Sullivan 
and Steve Salatore played 
well for Kenny's Lock. 
Local 2222 • 6 
Spillane & Epstein - 4 

Todd Schofield pitched 
brilliantly while Andrew 
Livingstone and Patrick 
Sullivan provided the clutch 
in hitting as Local 2222 tri- 
umphed over first-place 
S&E. 

Kyle Daniels (2 hits) 
pitched well for S&E and 
Matt Young and Nicholas 
Lavie each had a hit. 
In other action: 
Quincy PA.L. - 8 
YeUow Cab - 7 

Quincy P.A.L. jumped 
out to an early lead and held 



on for the win as it finished 
the regular season with a 
13-4-1 record. 

PAL took first place in 
the Joe DiMaggio Division, 
marking the third consecu- 
tive year it flnished with the 
best record in Triple A 
baseball. 

Dominic Poli (5-0-1) 
pitched three innings in the 
win and racked up six 
strikeouts. Jason "Flash" 
Purves notched his first save 
of the season and had eight 
strikeouts, including one 
with the tying run 60 feet 
away. 

For Yellow Cab, Chris 
O'Brien had a single and 
home run and Mike Regan 
had a double in a sixth in- 
ning rally. 

Brendon Clifford settled 
down after a Hve-run first 
inning to pitch a strong 
game. 



Imaginative Insurance Wins Pair 



Despite a successful hid- 
den ball play. Imaginative 
Insurance rolled for four 
runs in the seventh inning to 
come from behind and beat 
O'Brian's Bakery, 7-6, in 
the second round of the In- 
ternational League playoffs. 

Sean Richardson struck 
out 11 on the mound for 
Imaginative and George 
Camia a 300-foot home run 
over the left field fence. It 
was the team's seventh 



homer of the season. 

Dallas Huggins had the 
game-winning RBI single in 
the seventh. 

Coach Jimmy Abdou 
protested the hidden ball 
trick. 

Tm sure that there are 
many more things you can 
teach the players in a half 
hour other than the hidden 
baU trick." he said. Time 
was still out, anyway. I 
guess the umpire didn't re- 
alize time isn't back in until 



the pitcher takes the rub- 
ber." 

In the opening round of 
the playoffs. Imaginative 
Insurance turned in an im- 
pressive 28-5m win over 
SSGA with Camia striking 
out 10 batters for the ninth 
time this year. 

Camia also had two hits, 
Adam O'Hara had four runs 
batted in and Dave Grogan 
and Mike McGuire had 
three hits ^>iece. 



Tlmnday.Jiily 1,1999 TIm Qulaoy Sua Page 19 



NHL-Draft Pick Ryan 
Follows His Own Script 



Council Votes $75,000 
To Preserve City Records 



(Cont'd From Page 17) 

know about it, but I think a 
lot of the scouts knew about 
the injury. I really didn't 
have a dioice. I only had a 
few games left at BC High 
and, in my mmd, I thought 1 
had to play." 

Up until the last few 
years, people thought 
Ryan's size was going to be 
a problem. He was a skinny 
kid who hadn't yet reached 
six feet. There was no way 
he was going to survive 
college and the NHL, forget 
about it. But Ryan had a late 
growth spurt and he shot up 
to over six feet, even though 
he didn't put on the weight 
to match his ftame. 

"I thought the size would 
be his Achilles' heel and 
hold him back," says his 
father. "But he had that 
growth spurt and I think 
that's what attracted these 
colleges and pro scouts. It's 
just a matter of filling out 
more." 

"I heard about [my size] 
while I was growing up," 
says Ryan. "But over the 
last year, all the teams I've 
talked to never really said I 
was too small. There's defi- 
nitely room for growth. It's 
going to take a few years to 
put on the muscle." 

"He has the height, the 
skating ability and the 
skills," adds his father. "I 
think the big factor, too, is I 
got to speak to a Dallas per- 
son and they really liked his 
character." 

The Dallas organization 
found out what type of kid 
Ryan was in an interview 
back in April, which Ryan 
said lasted longer than any 
other ones he had, giving 



him a feeling they might 
pick him in the draft. 

• "I spent pretty much the 
whole day with them," says 
Ryan. **It lasted quite a few 
hours so they got to know 
me a little better than other 
teams off the ice." 

And there's a little twist 
to Dallas' selection. Public 
relations director Larry 
Kelly, a Quincy native 
who's father, Larry Sr., and 
brother, Steve, are also on 
the Quincy police force with 
Ryan's father, already knew 
some things about the player 
they coveted. 

When Ryan was five- 
years-old and just beginning 
to play in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association ranks, 
Kelly, who at the time 
worked at Coleman's 
Sporting Goods in Quincy 
Center, would pick out his 
hockey equipment. He was 
a friend of the family and 
knew about Ryan's charac- 
ter. 

Ryan has been around 
hockey practically his entire 
life. It began in the Quincy 
youth leagues and other 
various local leagues and 
all-star teams, where Ryan 
played with the likes of 
1999 draftees Tim Connolly 
(Sth pick and first American 
drafted. New York Island- 
ers) and Jeff Jillson (14th, 
San Jose Sharks). 

And he still plays in a 
local league, Thursday night 
Top Gun in Hingham, 
which is comprised mostly 
of Division I college players 
mixed in with a few NHL 
players with local ties, such 
as Ted Donato and Scott 
LaChance. 



"He was pretty well fo- 
cused as a kid," says his 
father. "He used to watch 
hockey on TV and analyze 
it. He was always dedi- 
cated." 

Right now, Ryan will 
stick to the second part of 
his sixth-grade scheme - 
college hockey. Come fall, 
Ryan will be skating for 
Bruce Crowder's (a former 
Boston Bruin) Northeastern 
Huskies. 

"I have a lot of filling out 
to do," says Ryan. "So I'm 
going to go there right 
now." 

But he hasn't shut the 
door on possibly leaving 
school early to join the 
Stars' organization 

"After a few years, if I 
feel like I can make the 
jump and play at the next 
level, I'd sit down with my 
family and coach and see 
where Fm at," says Ryan. 
"If I felt comfortable and 
ready then I'd do it." 

Ryan's recent success 
has been somewhat nerve- 
wracking for him and his 
family over the last few 
weeks up until the time his 
name was called early in the 
second round of last Satur- 
day's draft. A year ago, no 
one had pictured this. 

"You always hope your 
son, or any local kid for that 
matter, becomes success- 
ful," says his father. "If you 
asked me a year ago, I 
would've said just getting 
into college is one thing." 

For Ryan, that wouldn't 
have been good enough. His 
fantasy would've been left 
behind in his sixth-grade 
english class. 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

The city council Monday 
unanimously approved a 
$75,000 appropriation re- 
quest as part of a five-year 
project to preserve the city's 
records from its earliest be- 
ginnings. 

The first installment will 
come from fiscal year 2000 
revenues. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
said the New England His- 
toric Genealogical Society 
has agreed to provide a 
3234,000 matching grant for 
the city to microfilm not 
only the vital records but the 
minutes of the earliest se- 
lectmen's meetings, dating 
back to 1625. 

Shea said working with 
the late H. Hobart Holly, 
who had served as president 
of the Quincy Historical 
Society for many years, they 
had begun to preserve 
Quincy 's historical records. 
She said he took $400 or 
$500 from his election book 
to preserve one or two 
books. 

Shea said it was a chance 
encounter meeting Jim 
Larkin of Greenwich, 
Conn., who was doing ge- 
nealogical research at city 
hall, and learned that the 
genealogical society pro- 
vides matching grants. 

Larkin, said Shea, is a 
Quincy native and a mem- 
ber of the board of directors 



of NEHGS, which has 
headquarters on Newbury 
Street in the Back Bay. 

NEHGS representatives 
have spent about 50 hours 
already at city hall, looking 
over the historic gold mine. 
He said it would be a dev- 
astating loss if fire or an- 
other catastrophe destroyed 
these original records. 

Shea said only the first 
volume of the town's earli- 
est records is not stored in 
Quincy. 

It is in Braintree, he said. 
Before Quincy separated 
fiom the town of Braintree 
in 1792, it was known as the 
North Precinct of Braintree. 
Quincy did not become a 
city until 1888. 

Councillor-at-large Paul 
Harold, a history buff, noted 
that the birth certificates of 
two of Quincy 's patriots — 
John Hancock and John 
Adams — are also housed at 
the Braintree town hall. 



Added Mayor James 
Sheets: "It's critical to have 
this work done in order to 
preserve our archives for the 
future. These are important 
documents; we have such 
historical roots." 

Sheets added he hoped at 
some point in the future, 
Braintree can do what 
Quincy is doing and perhaps 
share cc^ies of the first vol- 
ume of Quincy 's history. 

"Unfortunately," he 
added, "we have no control 
over the documents, even 
though they are important to 
our history." 

Although Monday 
night's vote will allow the 
preservationists to begin 
work July 1, realistically, 
said Shea, they probably 
won't begin until Aug. 1. 

He said Quincy's records 
of birth, marriage and 
deaths are also on microfilm 
or microfiche are stored by 
the commonwealth as well. 



Pet Adoption Days 
At Animal Pound 



The Quincy animal 
pound will hold a pet adop- 
tion day every Saturday 
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 
Sunday from 9 a.m. to noon 
in an effort to place the nu- 
merous dogs, cats and kit- 
tens available for adoption. 

The pound is located at 



56 Broad St., off Southern 
Artery, near the Quincy po- 
lice station. For more in- 
formation, call Chrissie or 
Beverly at (617) 376-1364. 

The shelter is mn entirely 
by volunteers. Presently, it 
is fiill, with nine dogs, 14 
cats and 28 kittens. 



POUTICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



Morrisette Hopes 

Win Over Weymouth 

Boosts Confidence 



(Cont'd From Page 17) 
do something because we 
have three strong starters 
this year." 

On June 22, Morrisette 
extended its losing skid to 
five games with a 14-9 loss 
to Cohasset. The game was 
actually suspended in the 
sixth inning because the 
sprinkler system at Cohasset 
High School went on and 
would not shut off. The 
game was completed the 
next day at Adams Field 
before the two teams were 
to square off again. 

In the second game, Rob 
Celata led the way as Mor- 
risette snapped its losing 
streak with a 7-2 victory. 
Celata (2-1) went the dis- 
tance, allowing no runs on 
just two hits while punching 
out nine batters. 

Celata, who is batting 
over .500, went hitless in 
that game for the first time 
all season. 

"He's our top hitter," 
said Cattaneo. "He's a good 
spi.xy hitter. He hits the out- 
side pitch to left and the 
inside pitch up the middle. 



He's very cool and calm up 
there. He's done a great job 
pitching, too." 

Goodrich went 3 for 4, 
Shawn Manning 2 for 4 
(two triples) with three UBIs 
and Bregoli 2 for 2. 

Morrisette fell, 7-3, to 
West Roxbury in its next 
game on June 24. Joe Flynn 
picked up the loss despite 
pitching pretty well. He 
pitched the whole game, 
yielding six hits and four 
earned runs. The offense 
just couldn't muster enough 
hits off the West Roxbury 
starter. 

On June 26, Morrisette 
suffered a crushing defeat to 
Canton at Adams Field, 
losing 11-1. McCann got the 
starting nod but couldn't 
find his control. He walked 



seven, hit a batter and threw 
three wild pitches. 

McCann didn't get much 
help from his defense, 
though. Morrisette made 
two errors in the first inning 
as Canton scored five un- 
earned runs and never 
looked back. 

Celata had two hits and 
Goodrich had a hit and RBI. 

Morrisette played two 
games while the paper was 
in print (Randolph Tuesday 
night and Braintree 
Wednesday night) and will 
play West Roxbury tomor- 
row night at Adams Field. 

"We have a tough week 
ahead of us," Cattaneo said 
Monday afternoon. "We 
play all the top teams." 

By CHRIS POISSON 




We need 
you. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodatkmJ 







ELECT 
WILLIAM F. WEED 

GANDroATE FOR CITY COUNCIL 
WARD I-DEMOCRAT 

A STRONG, 
INDEPENDENT 
VOICE FOR 
WARD I 



ISSUES AFFECTING WARD I; 

TRAFFIC SAFETY ON SEA STREET. 

THE CITY DEBT SERVICE IS OUT OF 

CONTROL!!! 

YOUNG ADULTS NEED MORE SOCL\L 

AND RECREATION PROGRAMS. 

THE FUTURE OF THE CVS BUILDING 

IN MERRYMOUNT??? 

HOW MUCH WILL THE HOSPITAL 

REALLY COST QUINCY TAXPAYERS? 

CoamnllBe to Elect WilUim F. Weed, JwB Kane, ClHiinDan 



Pi^20 'n>« QttlMLoy fihm ThurKJay, July 1, 1999 






1554 Hancock St., (Julncy Center 
7?Ch9Zn ?e£)^.77Chdf272 
Breakfast Served 6am-1lam 
Homemade Soups, Salade & Veaeerte 
Gouitnet Co^666 
Pellclou6 Ice Cream & Frozen Yogurts 
CATERING AVAILABLE 
HOURS: Moru%-fTkfec/ 6am-4pm 





^ 



LUNCH DINNER 

Tueiday • Friday Tunday • SuncUjr 

Entrees $6.9S ■ $9.95 Early Dinner Speciala $9.95 • $ 1 2.95 

Sunday Bmmch lt:0O-2, 
FuoeUtm PofiUtitf AftvmmodnUag iO><Zi 

Weddinfjs • Rehearsal * Dinners • Social Gatherings . 

En<faf]ement Parties ifj 



• Bridal Showers 




VINNYSCARNICI 

Parts, Service, 
Body Shop Director 


SHIRETOWN FORD 

147 Samoset St/Rt 44 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

QualitijgKS 

1-800-649-9246 
(508)746-3400 



KING CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

INumben 
racket? 

5 Get that . 
last drop 
of gravy 

8Lady 
Macbeth's 
problem 

12 Sub in a 
tub 

13 Greek 
cross 

14 Summon 
oni| 
beeper 

15 Bonier 
presenta- 
tion 

17 Man, e.g. 
ISPIients' 

employee 
19 Past. 

present 

and future 
21Xasa- 

blanca** 

pianist 

22 Reception 
problem 

23 Spade or 
dub 

26 Jailer's 

jangler 
28 Under way 
31 Leading 

man 
33Weir 
35 Priceless? 
361Wan{^ 
38 One of 

Louisa's 



gills 
40 Parched 
41Plison 
43"-Misei^ 

ables" 
AS Withhold 

sustenance 
47 Conse- 
quence 

51 Jason's 
ship 

52 Exodus 
obs0vanoe 

54 Creditor's 
arrange- 
ment 

55 Wt. units 

56 Hoofer's 
prop 

57 Play wioi 
aPrisbee 

58Venly 
59 "Fish 

Magic" 

artist 
DOWN 
1 Swabs 
2Kyigyz- 

stanrange 

3 Criterion 

4 Sajak and 
Itebek 

5 Attacked 
violently 

6 Crew need 

7 Green 
shots 

g<*Rhoda''or 
"Phyllis" 

9 Long- 
popular 
game 



snow 
10 Stare 
llBaU- 

bearing 

gadgets 
16nn^le 
20 Bambi's 

aunt 

23 Spider 

24 Greek peak 

25 Gail 
Sheehy 
book 

27 Sweet 
potato 

29 "-the 
fields we 
go 

30 Mystery 
writer 
Jo8q)hine 

32 Dowagers 
34 Mandies- 

ter<x- 

Etberidge 
37Ullmann 

oriyier 
39 Lapidaiy's 

supply 
42 Answer 

44 Kirk's 
cohort 

45 Tv 

46 Small 
combo 

48 Elliptical 

49 M. 
Descartes 

50 Forest 
denizen 

53Rushmofe 
figure 



TRIVIA TEfT 

by Aaron E. Tucker 



Your Horoscope 
Natasha 



AHfMftMr TO CROrrWORD 



niiioiii 



nnnH nau nnnn 



nrro [Dro_unnnn 



^^n"'^^"^ 



\mna nnwannan 



1. What was the oaine of 
the lodge that Alice's 
(actiett Audrey Meadows) 
husband Ralph (Jackie 
Oleason) bekoged to oo the 
legendary "The 
Hooeymoonen" 1930s sit- 
com that annoyed her 
because of aU of Ralph's 
siUineis? 

2. Can you name the state 
capital of New York? 

3. Outside of die Trice Is 
Right", what game show 
originally brought Bob 
Bariwr to national staiYlom? 

4. What state and town 
was former President James 
Earl Carter bom hi? 

5. From what country did 
the United Stotes puichase 
the state of Alaska? 

6. What United States 
city is known throughout 
the workl as die "Gty of 



lOOLakes"? 

7. Can you name die actor 

who portrayed nJncle 
Fester hi die 1960's bit sit- 
com, "nnie Addama 
Family"? 

8. Can you name former 

President Richard M. 
Niium's vice president dur- 
ing die 1968 and 1972 cam- 
paigns who woold eventual- 
ly resign dut post in nadon- 
al disgrace? 



TRIVIA 
AN/WERr 



1 . The Raccoon Lodge; 2. 
Albany; 3. "Tmth or 
Consequence!"; 4. Plains, 
Ga.; 5. The Soviet Union; 6. 
Winter Haven. Fla.. home to 
worid-famoua Cypress 
Gardens; 7. Jackie Coogan; 
S.SpiroT.Agnew 



H()( US-H)( US 



Niimv aoLTmorF 



' 


2 


s— 


^ 


1 


I'" 




^ 




8 


9 


w 


TT 


12 








«■ 






i4 








W" 
















i7 








11 












1 


id 


20 










^^B 


2l 






s- 






^■1 


23 


24 


25 


■ 


26 




27 


P" 






29 


30 


M- 






32 


■ 


^ 




34 


■ 


a& 








*" 










■ 


91 




:■ 


m 






^■■■|41 






42 


1 


MS 




44 ^^^^^H 


4S 


46 










'^ 






46 


49 


SO 


ST" 










Sfi 


M 














W" 








s5 






1 


u 
















U 






u 










•I miVPaN *• '•"•'•lap X <'*'M3«* >"B *$ 
^ pmoto » "iafluoi M ttuad t,Mteid 8 
•« Oumatt z (kassiui sfiaa l 



CR1TIC7' CORNER 



NOmNG HIUL: Thii 
delightful conedic romp 
hai eleoiemi of t fairy tale. 
In fact, at times. I wu 
leminded of the rooMuice of 
the then Lady Diaaa 
Spencer, a child-care work- 
er, and His Royal ICghiieu 
PriDce Charles. 

JuUa Roberto sian as 
Anita Scott, a supentar 
actress who is intematiooal- 
ly kaown and celebrated. 
Here, art imitates Ufe. Julia 
is the highest-paid star in 
lUMywood. Btagh Gnat 
co-sian as William 
Thacker. a regular thiub 
who runs a boo ks to re in d>e 
West London neighbofhood 
caUed NooiM HiU. The fia 
It^ins when Ama goes into 
WiUisn's bookstate lo bay 
a Inok. In one fcU swoop, 
both their lives are fhsngnd 

So flnsierad is poor 
WiOiam. he spilte onage 
juice on Anna's aliift He 
apologises ptofaaely and 
oftas her Us nearby flat as 
a place lo freshen ap. This 
is. of 



cions beginning to their 
romance. And. sure enough, 
it's an on-again, off-again 
situatioo (well, mostly alt). 

To compUcale autiers 
even more (or the yowig 
lovers, dw papnmai won't 
leave them alone. For Us 
part, William has some 
loony friends who don't 
help at all, paiticalariy his 
crude roommate. Spika 
(Rhya Ifhaa). Things go 
fntu bad to worse when 
Anna's overbearing ex- 
boyfriend shows vp. (This 
is an unbilled cameo for 
Alac BaMwin. Why kn 
look dtis Mt part, with no 
credit yet, is beyond me!) 

Despha being sonewhnt 
uneven and coatrivad, tna 
movie is a winarr. Thaf s 
becaase whenever tiie 
■lory's headed iaio a «icfa. 



ilLTbair 
ch Mnis try is bayond capil- 
vadng. In (hct, as saniln. 
gioas as it a oaads. ihay 
atanoat com par e lo Tkacy 
and Hepburn hi ' ' 
day. 
Dmtarita*li 



ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) A steamy roman- 
tic ioterlude has the capaci- 
ty to change the \vay you 
view the world. Just make 
sure you're not seeing mat- 
ters through completely 
rose-tinted glasses. 

TAURUS (April 20 May 
20) Others may be inspired 
by your forward-looking 
attitude. A practical assess- 
ment of your co-woricers' 
skills wins everyone a place 
on the team. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) Others may be 
channeling events along a 
course that is not in your 
best interest. This is a good 
time to be selfish about 
your needs. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) Your natural enthu- 
siasm for life can cany you 
through a trying period. But 
add a lotich of humor for a 
little light comic relief. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) Become a part of some- 
thing rather than turning it 
into a part of you. You have 
absolutely no tolerance for 
other people's foolishness. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Believe it or 
not, that little voice inside 
your head really does have 
an off switch. Try to stop 
worrying long enough to 
enjoy that which you've 
recently gained. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Your move- 
ments are efficient, and 
your stride is filled with 
purpose. Wi|h such force 
and dedication behind you, 
success is inevitable. 

SCORPIO (October 23 
10 November 21) An okl 
habit may become too 
expensive to continue. A 
change in your domestic 
sphere bodes well for die 
fdture. 




(November 22 lo December 
21) Time flies when you're 
having fun, but remember 
to stop for a rest at some 
point Make sure that you're 
not neglecting any impor- 
tant responsiMities. 

CAPRICORN 
(December 22 to January 
19) You are cursed widi the 
task of explaining jargon to 
someone who h^ a literal 
mind. Take a deep breadi 
and try to stay calm. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 18) The sub- 
tleties of other people's 
emotional states are obvi- 
ous to you. Make your own 
statement with flowers and 
an apology if necessary. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Be patient or you 
will only generate more 
hystoia in the midst of a 
complex situation. If you 
feel unable to move for- 
ward, why not try backing 
up a ifew steps. 

YOU BORN THIS 
WEEK: People who try to 
understand you on a ratio- 
nal level generally fail mis- 
erably. You are an intuitive, 
sensitive and creative crea- 
ture who operates on a dif- 
ferent rcahn. Many gravi- 
tate to your dieatrical talent 
and dramatic flair, only to 
be put off by your taapa 
tantrums. 



ei9991Ci]« 



Syad..] 




For home subscription, 

please call 

(617) 471-3100 



Thunday, July 1« 1999 Tk* Qulaej Sua Page 21 



I^ELieiCN 



♦.^ 



Vacation Bible School 
At Union Congregational 



United Methodist 



The Lord's Planting 



Vacation Bible School 
(VBS) at Union 
Congregational Church 
will be held July 26-30 
from 9 a.m. to noon. 

The program, sponsored 
by the Interchurch Council 
of Wollaston and North 
Quincy, will be under the 
directica of Rev. Martha 
Swanson, minister of 
Qutrench at Union Church. 

VBS is for children 
ages Toddler through fifth 
grade regardless of church 



affiliation. Bible Songs, 
games and crafts will be 
featured as well as a visit 
from "Chuckles" the Show 
Dog of Happy Dog 
Obedience School and 
"Cracker Jack" the Horse 
of the Quincy Police 
Department. 

It is expected that 
captain Jack and members 
of Union Church's Cocoa 
House will participate . 

For more information 
call 479-6661 



"The New Revolution" 
will be the Topic of guest 
speaker Ernest Bromaghin, 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Assisting with the 



liturgy will be Florence 
Hunter. Esther Paulsen will 
be the Greeter and Keith 
Eisenhauer and Donald 
Hunter will be the ushers. 

Joan Honig and Kathryn 
white will be the hosts at 
the coffee hour. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 



The worship service 
Sunday at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
310 Manet Ave., will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. 



The sermon topic will 
be "Liberty Is Always 
Unfinished Business." 

The sanctuary is air 
conditioned. 



Rev. Kingsley Grant 
from Evangel Temple in 
Miami, Fla., will be guest 
preacher Sunday at the 11 
a.m. service at the Lord's 
Planting, Quincy Four- 
square Church, 65 Newbury 
Ave., North Quincy. 

Rev. Grant, youth min- 
ister at Evangel Temple, is 
visiting Quincy with his 
team. New Vision Youth 
Ministry from the church's 
Impact Boston summer 
youth outreach. They will 
minister in drama and 
dance. 

For transportation to the 
church, call 847-4444. Child 



care is available during 
service times. The church is 
handicap accessible. 
Also scheduled Sunday: 

Prayer meeting from 
' 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.; animated 
Bible stories for children, 
adult Sunday school and 
discipleship classes from 10 
to 11 a.m.; and children's 
Sunday school, 11:30 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center 
will have morning worship 
with Holy Communion 
Sunday beginning at 10 
a.m. 

Rev. William Harding, 
pastor, will preach a 
sermon entitled "Let 
Freedom Ring!" The 
Lemonade in the Shade 
Church School will be 
held during the worship 
hour. Scripture reader will 
be Winslow Bettinson. 

Music for the Service 
will be provided by the 
Friends of Bethany Choral 
group. Organist will be 



Rev. George Hodgkins. 
Members of the 

Diaconate, Jean and 
George Baker and Nancy 
and Jack Douglas will 
assist in serving 
Communion. 

This is Pantry Shelf 
Sunday for Interfaith 
Social Services. The first 
in the Series of Mid-week 
Concerts Wednesday, July 
7 at 12:15 p.m. will feature 
Peter Krasinski, organist. 
The concert is free. 
Following the Concert a 
luncheon is available for 
$3. 



Wollaston Baptist 



There will be an Inde- 
pendence Day "Great De- 
bate" Sunday, at the 10 a.m. 

worship service at Wollas- 
ton Baptist Church, 81 
Prospect Ave. 



The American flag and 
the Bible will debate their 
relationship to each other 
and will offer insight as to 
whether we are American 
Christians or Christian 
Americans. 



Give. 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart fr^ 
AssodatioaJ^^ 




Quincy Pound 




.'^... .'%..^ SI* ..■,.. ^_,, i.;., .^^. . .-^r 



All animals are current on vaccinations and 
will be spayed or neutered upon adoption. 

Sam; Blacic f jh-miK. neutered male, beautiful, incredible 
family dog, shots up to date. 

Shana; Rottweiler, female, 2 years, extremely friendly, 
good for strong owner. 

Elvis: Bhic Tick Hound, male, 3 years, extremely friendly. 

Scrggant! Shepherd-inii. neutered male, 2 years, orange, 1 
blue eye and the other, brown. He would do well with strong 
male figure. 

DuBcani Coeker Snanid. female, 2 years, buff color, 
friendly. 

Jake: Boxer Pitt Bull-croM. male, tan, adults only. 

pnrtin; Shar-Prf .mi« male, 7 months, very friendly love- 
bug. 

Rl«flrf#! lUlyiaii .Sh^phwrf-mi* male, 8 months, small 
longhaired, black with some white.- Was abused but has come 
around incredibly. 

Riwyn; .<;p riiiggr .Spaw igl-mlg male, 11 months, black & 



white, very sweet, was abused. 

fif IflT Kittm F1V A FLV tested and several adult cats all 
under 2 yean, extremely friendly. 

CcmtMt Oftk^rs Doiaw Cmiboy and Brvee DiBella. 
37^1364 

^ 'OaOy Hoars: 8:30 am •>4t30pffi.Cl^edS^dij 
Adoption it Redslmlttf Hmtit 
g;30 • f*M tashmA i*M -4:30 pr 
^fivm: ThijSou^SfumeHiimtau&ociet; 



utuc 



I mi 



j£Jii*cctin 



si:ii\i(i:s & {( iiviriis 



Asscmbliei of God 

158 M4uh/ng^n7CQu/ncy 

phone: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory f . Wheaton, ftator 

Summer Worship 
Schedule Sunday, 10am 

4 Youth it Children's Ministry 
A*Contemporary Worship 
■■ •Marriage & Fam.'y Group 
■i •International Fellowship 
^^. •DivorceCare 



CathoUc 



* 



Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

Masses: 

Saturday 4:30PM 

Sunday 9AM & 11AM ^ 

Daily Mass QAM 



Church Of St. John 
The Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDUl^: 

Dally 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

t tondfcriypocf A ccmatttila 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Stnti 

Quincy, IHA 02160 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30. 10. 11 :30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

C0NFESSK3NS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicappecl accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditiofted 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A ftomanCtritnlic Community tMtdngtogeOter 

In Failh, Worship. Education and Service' 

380 Hancock St. North Quincy. MA 02171 

(BIT) 328-868S 

Sunday Maaaoi 

4pm (Sal) 7:45stfn, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weekudy Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat 9am 

HtndJcsppiHi A^v nuriMt 

' ConfMalona 

Sol 30:45pm In Saint Joaeph Oratory 



,4::. ;^.. CathoUc ^i^ 

STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday h4ass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptism, 2nd Sunday, 1 1:15AM 



Saint Ann's Ciiurch 

7S7 Hancock Stnet Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Thomas Keane 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11:00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 1 1:30am. Weeifdays 9am 

HmHUcappetl AccMtlble 

New Members Welcome! 



Congregational 



HOUGHS NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue, Quincy 

'Where The Star Of Love Shines' 

Services of Worship 

9:30am 

Wheelchair accessible 
Air conditioned 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

10AM SurKJay Worship 

Church School with Child Care Provided 

'Unknown Consequences' 

Rev. Cherie Daniel Assoc. Pastor 



UNION congrcgahonal 

CHURCH 

Beach Street & Ftawson Fid., WoMaston 

479-6661 

Rev. John Carl Stvanson, pastor 

Sunday Worship 10AM 
•What a C ourt Hath CM E ngland' 

piscopal 





St Chrysostoin*s 
Episcopal Church 

Coroer of Hancock & Linden Sts. 

Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 

Rev. Claude Smith 

Sunday Worship 

9:30am 

Morning Prayer with 

Sermon and Eucharist 

CkiU care provided 

Everybody Welcome 
Thrift Shop Closed fw tiie Summer 




TO ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE CALL 471-3199 



IE 



ngr^ational 

BETTOWT 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Comer of Spear A Coddlngton Sts., 

Quincy Center * 479-7300 

10am Worship A Holy Cortwnunion 

Rev. William Harding, preaching 

'Let Freedom Ring' 

Gos 



FoursquareCospel 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Comer of Newbury Ave. A 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy • 847-4444 

Guest preacher Rev. Kir}gsley Grant 
New Visk>n Youth Ministry 
Rev. Bill Donahue, pastor 



Methodist 



<r 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston •773-3319 

Sunday Worship 10AM 

The New Revolutkm' 

Ernest Bromaghin guest speaker 

Nazarene 

Woiiaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston, 472-5669 

flnr. SmutI Chung: Pettor 

QuIneyC h l n tm Church ollhelkaimm 

Sunday Servioet, 8:4Sam Hdy Communion 

9:30»n CtfUonese WonNp (Angel Ch^ 

9:45am Ovislian EducaNcn (al ages) 

1 1am Morning Worship Caletntion 

* Nunery C«e «id Children's Church ttrough grade 4 

6pm Evening Servioa (ooniemporary) 

77w MUMon Churcft a<»w Mamm ii 

iiroo n ii fo nedar>dirf i eate / iair a oc 6M m > . 

AU.AREWELCOI1IE 






THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

1 1AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spiritualist 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 Wegt St, Quincy, MA 02109 
(617)770-2246 

Seonce Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. BerkowUz. C.H..C.kl. 




TOADVERTISE 
IN THIS 
DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE 
CALL 
471-3100 



■',*. 



Page 22 Tli* QuliMiy 8iu& Thursday, July 1, 1999 



COITUAI^IES 



Charles H. Sylvester, 72 

Train Director, World War II Veteran 



A funeral service for 
Charles H. Sylvester, 72, of 
Ouincy, a train director for 
Amtrak and a World War II 
veteran, was conducted 
Tuesday by Rev. LuAnn 
Johnson in Covenant Con- 
gregational Church. 

Mr. Sylvester died June 
26 at Quincy Hospital. 

He worked as a train di- 
rector for over 30 years at 
the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road and Amtrak before 
retiring in 1989. 

He served in the U.S. 
Navy during World War II. 

He was a member of the 
Covenant Congregational 
Church in Quincy, a 50-year 
member of the Odd Fellows 
of Maine, and a 58-year 
member of The Granite City 
Grange, where he was the 
master. He also served as 
chaplain of the American 
Legion Post 380 in Houghs 
Neck and chaplain for the 
Sons of the American Le- 



gion. 

Born in Biddeford, 
Maine, Mr. Sylvester gradu- 
ated from Thornton Acad- 
emy in Saco, Maine. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Virginia (Hodgkinson) 
Sylvester; a son, W. Carl 
Sylvester of Lewisville, 
Texas; two daughters. 
Sheila Sylvester of Ger- 
mantown, Md., and Caroline 
Mclntyre of Virginia Beach, 
Va.; a brother, Daniel 
Sylvester of Portland, 
Maine; five grandchildren; 
three great-grandchildren 
and nine step great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe Fu- 
neral Home, 26 Adams St., 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the Covenant Congrega- 
tional Church, 315 Whitwell 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Ralph E. Fantasia, 76 

Plumber, Worid War II Veteran 

A funeral Mass for Ralph He is survived by his 

E. Fantasia, 76, of Quincy, a wife, Gloria J. (Buccini) 

plumber and a World War II Fantasia; two sons, Stephen 

Army veteran, was cele- R- Fantasia of Abington and 

brated Tuesday at St. John Jeffrey P. Fantasia of 

the Baptist Church, 44 Quincy; a sister, Rose 



Dominic A. DiCristofaro, 74 

Owned Kennedy Butter, Egg Store 



School St. 

Mr. Fantasia died June 
25 at Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

He was a member of the 
Plumbers Union Local 12 
for more than 50 years be- 
fore retiring in 1985. 

Bom in Cambridge, he 
was a lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent. He graduated from the 
Quincy Vocational Techni- 
cal School. 



D'Olimpio of Quincy; and 
two grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mount 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Ouincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 1115 W. Chestnut 
St., Brockton, MA 02301. 



Lillian M . Reams, 79 



John F. O'Connell, 76 

Senior Custodian For Quincy Schools 



A private funeral service 
was held for Lillian M. 
(Wisneski) Reams, 79, of 
Quincy, a homemaker. 

Mrs. Reams died on her 
birthday, June 23, at home 
after a long illness. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
in Dorchester many years 



a brother, Frank Wisnewski 
of Duxbury; a sister, Helen 
Jankowski of Dorchester; 
four grandchildren; and sev- 
eral nieces and nephews. 
She was the mother of the 
late William M. Reams. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 



A funeral service for 
John F. O'Connell, 76,. of 
Quincy,. was held Monday 
at the ' Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave., Quincy. 

Mr. O'Connell died June 
24 at Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

He was a senior custo- 
dian for the Quincy School 
Department. He worked 
there for 35 years before 
retiring in 1984. 

He was a World War II 
Coast Guard veteran. 



Bom in Quincy, he was a 
lifelong resident of the city. 
He was a graduate of North 
Quincy High School. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Ruth E. (Conley) 
O'Connell; two sons, 
Timothy J. O'Connell of 
Holbrook and Kenneth 
Broderick of Quincy; a 
brother, C. Edward 
O'Connell of Brockton; 
three grandchildren; and 
several nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 



before moving to Quincy in Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 

1973. Elm St., Quincy Center. 

Wife of the late George Donations may be made 

M. Reams, she is survived to the Hospice of the South 

by a son, George M. Reams Shore, 100 Bay State Drive, 

Jr. of Cocoa Beach, Fla.; Braintree, MA 02184, or 

two daughters, Nancy Scan- The American Cancer Soci- 

nell of Rochester, N.Y., and ety, 1115 W. Chestnut St., 

Linda Reams of Weymouth; Brockton, MA 02301 . 

Virginia R. Renda, 86 




SCOTT DEW ARE 



A ThoiiighP 
For The Week 

Every generation in America owes a 
debt to the past. This is a country of free- 
dom only because the men and women who 
lived in the past had the courage to fight 
and the will to sacrifice. They won and held 
the freedom we ei^oy. Without their vi- 
sion, their hard work and their savings, 
we would not have our great industries, 
our unmatched standard of living, our 
vast system of universal education and our desire for better living. 
Because of this debt to the past, every generation in America has an 
obligation to the fiiture. It is to pass on to those who follow us the 
freedom and opportunities we inherited. No generation has the right 
to live for itself alone. No generation has the right to squander the 
earnings of the generation yet unborn. It is not right for the 
present to rob and enslave the fbture. Rather, if there is such a thing 
as a natural moral law, every generation must pay to the future the 
debt that it owes to the past . . . 

On this most important day - the fourth of July - let us be thankful 
for our past, be aware of our responsibilities of today, and pledge our 
obligatkm to the fiiture . . . 

Deware Family Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 

Wollaston Chapel Hannel Chapel 

576 Hancock Street 86 Cop)eland Street 

Ouincy, MA 02170 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

A (617) 472-1137 
Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



A funeral Mass for Vir- 
ginia R. (Manduca) Renda, 
86, of Quincy, a home- 
maker, was celebrated June 
25 in St. John's Church. 

Mrs. Renda died June 22 
at the Crestview Nursing 
Home after a long illness. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
in South Boston before 
moving to Quincy 27 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late Mario J. 



Renda, she is survived by a 
son, Leonard S. Renda of 
Quincy; a daughter. Mari- 
etta A. O'Connor of 
Quincy; and three grand- 
children. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy Center. 



A funeral Mass for 
Dominic A. DiCristofaro, 
74, of Quincy, former owner 
of the Kennedy Butter and 
Egg Store in Weymouth, 
was celebrated Monday at 
Sacred Heart Church in 
Weymouth Landing. 

Mr. DiCristofaro died 
June 24 at Massachusetts 
General Hospital in Boston 
after a long illness. 

He owned and operated 
the Kennedy Butter and Egg 
Store for more than 50 years 
until his retirement in 1988. 

He was a veteran of 
Worid War II, where he 
served with the Army's 
289th Infantry Division and 
participated in the Battle of 
the Bulge. 

Born and raised in 
Quincy, he moved to Wey- 
mouth 50 years ago and 
returned to Quincy for the 
last year of his life. He had 
also been a winter resident 
of West Palm Beach, Fla., 
for 10 years. 

Harriet D. 

A funeral service for 
Harriet D. Couch, 95, of 
Quincy, a former clerk, was 
held June 24 at the Couch 
home on Dimmock St., 
Quincy. 

Miss Couch died June 21 
at home. 

She worked as a clerk for 
Bethlehem Steel in Quincy 
for many years. She also 
clerked for Quincy Coop- 
erative Bank. 

She was a member of the 
Christ Church Episcopal in 



Mr. DiCristofaro was an 
active member of the Sacred 
Heart Parish Church in 
Weymouth Landing. He was 
also a member of the 
Knights of Columbus' 
Quincy Council 96. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Jane (Poliatti) Di- 
Cristofaro of Quincy; a son, 
Donald C. DiCristofaro of 
Hingham; a daughter, Diane 
M. Martinez of Houston; a 
brother, Fred DiCristofaro 
of Quincy; three grandchil- 
dren and one great- 
grandson. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 1115 West Chest- 
nut St., Brockton, MA 
02301. 

Couch, 95 

Quincy. 

She was the daughter of 
the late William and E. Har- 
riet Couch. She was the sis- 
ter of the late William H. 
Couch and Sarah T. Couch. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, 26 Adams St., 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to Christ Church Episcopal, 
12 Quincy Ave., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Ellen A. Sullivan, 95 

A funeral Mass for Ellen Lady of Good Counsel 



A. (Cahill) Sullivan, 95, of 
Quincy, a homemaker, was 
celebrated June 26 in Our 




DENNIS SWEENEY 
FUNERAL HOMES 

Quincy 's First for Three Generations 
Dennis S. Sweeney Joseph M. Reardon 

Funeral Directors 
74 Elm Street • 326 Copeland Street • 611-113-2128 



Church. 

Mrs. Sullivan died June 
23 at the Colonial Nursing 
Home after a long illness. 

Bom in Quincy, she was 
a lifelong resident of the 
city. 

Wife of the late Warren 
J. Sullivan, she is survived 
by daughters Ellen A. Sulli- 
van of Quincy and Mary L. 
Comlin of Weymouth; three 
grandchildren and one 
great-grandchild. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to Our Lady of Good Coun- 
sel Church, 237 Sea St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodatiooJ 








FYofessional 
Dignified ■ Affordable 



Crenaticr Scciety cf Hassactijsetts 

Considering cremation? 

The increase in cremation is a dramatic worldwide trend, 
mirrored in Massachusetts, where cremation has become an 
economical and dignified alternative. 

We have a Free Brochure which will answer 1 5 of the most 
commonly asked questions regarding cremation. 

If cremation is your choice, consider aaing now to ensure 
that your wishes are fulfilled. For a copy of our no-obligation 
brochure, call 1-800-696-5887 {or 617-472-0098) today. 
Visit our website at www.cremation.org 



U^£: 



'Uranday, juty 1, lyyy 'A' A* wuuaciy j^ 



rage Aj 



Francis X. Sullivan, Jr., 64 

Retired Truck Driver 



A funeral Mass for Fran- 
cis X. Sullivan, Sr., 64, of 
Quincy, a retired truck 
driver for Airborne Express, 
was celebrated Tuesday at 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church, Houghs Neck. 

Mr. Sullivan died June 
25 at Quincy Hospital. 

He worked as a truck 
driver for Airborne Express 
in Boston for 30 years be- 
fore retiring in 1996. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Houghs Neck for 
the past 30 years. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Nancy M. (Holliday) 
Sullivan; four sons, Francis 
X. Sullivan, Jr., Paul M. 



Sullivan, Daniel Sullivan, 
and Timothy Sullivan, all of 
Quincy; two daughters. 
Donna M. Lane and Dianne 
McGeggin, both of Quincy; 
two brothers, James Sulli- 
van and Joseph Sullivan; a 
sister, Mary Utterback; four 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home^ 785 Han- 
cock St., WoUaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the MDA/ALS Associa- 
tion, 275 Turnpike St., Suite 
201, Canton, MA 02021. 



Anna Getek, 49 

Former Stop & Shop Cashier 



A funeral Mass for Anna 
(Szmyt) Getek, 49, of 
Quincy, a former cashier for 
Stop & Shop, was cele- 
brated June 26 at the Sacred 
Heart Church. 

Mrs. Getek died June 23 
at Brigham and Women's 
Hospital in Boston after a 
brief illness. 

She worked for Stop & 
Shop for 20 years. 

Bom in Poland, she lived 
ip Quincy many years. 

Her hobbies included 
reading and cooking. 

Mrs. Getek is survived 
by her husband, Thomas F. 
Getek, Sr. of Quincy; a son, 
Thomas F. Getek, Jr. of 
Quincy; her mother, Leo- 
kadia (Godlewski) Szmyt of 



Dorchester; three brothers, 
Ted Szmyt, Anthony Szmyt 
and John Szymt, Anthony 
Szmyt and John Szymt, all 
of Dorchester; three neph- 
ews and one niece. 

She was the daughter of 
the late Leonard Szmyt of 
Dorchester and the sister of 
the late Casmir Szmyt of 
Dorchester. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by Lydon Fu- 
neral Home, 644 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the Brigham and 
Women's Hospital, Devel- 
opment Office, 116 
Huntington Ave., 5th floor, 
Boston, MA 021 16. 



Robert G, Hayhurst, Sr., 73 

Former Boston Firefighter 

A funeral Mass for Rob- in South Boston before 
ert G. Hayhurst, Sr., 73, a moving to Quincy 30 years 

ago. 

Mr. Hayhurst is survived 
by his wife, Mary T. 
(Walsh) Hayhurst; a son, 
Michael F. Hayhurst of 
Canton; and two grandchil- 
dren. He was the father of 
the late Robert G. Hayhurst, 
Jr. 

Burial was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred D. 
Thomas Funeral Home, 
Milton. 

Donations may be made 
to the BFD Local 718 
Scholarship Fund, 55 Hallet 
St., Dorchester, MA 02124. 



former firefighter, was cele- 
brated June 25 in Saint 
Brigid's Church, South 
Boston. 

Mr. Hayhurst died June 
22 in his Quincy home. 

He was a Boston fire- 
fighter for 37 years before 
retiring in 1981. 

He was a member of the 
Boston Fire Relief Associa- 
tion, the Castle Island Asso- 
ciation, and the South Bos- 
ton Irish-American Asso- 
ciation. 

He served in the U.S. 
Marines Corps during 
World War II. 

Bom in Boston, he lived 



Quincy Shore Drive Fire 




FIREnCHTERS CHECK OUT charred fourth Hoor apart- 
ment where the five-alarm fire started in the building at 165 
Quincy Shore Drive last Wednesday. The blaze sent four 
firefighters and two residents to tlie hospital. 



TENANT JANICE DWYER cuddles her pet cat after the fire 
at 165 Quincy Shore Drive. Damage was estimated at $100,000. 
The cause of the fire is still under investigation. 

(Quincy Sun photos/Tom Gorman) 



Quincy Cultural Council 
To Receive $47^35 In Grants 



The Quincy Cultural 
Council will receive 
$47,335 in grants to fund 
41 cultural programs in 
Quincy. 

Announcement was 
made jointly by State Sen. 
Michael Morrissey and 



Reps. Bruce Ayers, Ronald workshops, live per- 
Mariano and Stephen formances, and First Night 
Tobin. events." 

The funds are "More than $4.2 million 
distributed by the Massa- 
chusetts Cultural Council, 
a state agency that 
supports public programs 
and educational activities 
in the arts, sciences and 
humanities. 

"The grant program 
helps enrich the lives of 



children" noted Mariano. 

Of this amount more 
than $600,000 will be 
distributed in the form of 
the PASS Program, which 
provides subsidies for 
youirg people to attend 
cultural events. 

The Cultural Council is 

part of a grassroots 

network of 335 local 

councils that serve every 

will be distributed by local city and town in the state. 



young and old alike and 
helps maintain Quincy's 
quality of life," said 
Morrissey. "The money 
will be used for a wide 
range, which includes 
cultural events, subsidies 
for students, literary 



cultural councils in 1999 
totaling more than 7,000 
grants statewide," said 
Tobin. 

"Approximately $2 
million will be distributed 
to support educational 
activities for school 



Six Residents Receive 
Boston College Degrees 



The Massachusetts Cul- 
tural Council Program is 
the largest of its kind in 
the United States. 

"The state legislature 
provides an annual 
appropriation to the 
Massachusetts Cultural 
Council, which then 
allocates funds to each 
local council," said 
Morrissey. "The decisions 



Four Residents Graduate Regis College 



Four Quincy residents 
recently graduated from 
Regis College in Wellesley. 

They are: 

Edward Sutliffe, Mary 
Taylor, Margaret Lahar and 



Kathleen Donaghey. The 



Six Quincy residents 
recently graduated from 
Boston College High 
School. 

They are: 

Connie Chu, 12 West 
Squantum St., AB degree in 
economics; Scott Joseph 
Dunn, 10 Marine St., AB in 
psychology; Kristen Susan 
Proude, 229 Everett St., BS 
in accounting; Anthony R. 
Sansevero, 19 Penn St., AB 
in psychology; David P. 
Twomey, 17 Monmouth St., 



about which activities to 
support are made at the 
community level, by the 
local cultural volunteers." 

"The Quincy Cultural 
Council members, Arthur 
Keough, chairman, Kelly 
Cobble, Janet DiTullio, 
Edward Fitzgerald, 
Eleanor Nelson, Maryellen 
O'Brien, Yolanda 
Paglierani, Yolanda 
Romanelli, Kristen 
Williams, and Carl 
Winded, make this project 
work by volunteering their 
time and energies towards 
this important project," 
said Ayers. "The Cultural 
Council should be 
commended for their 
continuing interest and 
involvement to support the 
arts and cultural activities 
in the City." 






.*t 



local graduates all received ^^ '" history; and Cathie 

^ Qiwen Ye, 281 Billings Rd., 

master of science degrees in BS in Hnance and informa- 

nursing. tion systems. 



Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



r^l 



m 



aRANITE 
lOCKCO 



SBMa 



MOBȣ 



/UnO*HOIIE*IUSINESS 

• OEAMOUSIIKTAliD 
•UKCIBEVED 
•DOM CLOSE 
•MMCHMDWAK 
•MnOBVSRTTD 
IVBITOURSNOIIVIOOM 



J 



7S5SO. 



Quwa 



472-2177 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I NAME 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■^■■■i I 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



STREET. 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
]1 YEAR IN QUINCY $15.00 

( ]1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $17.00 [ 
[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE * $20.00 .( 



[ 



] CHECK ENCLOSED 
] PLEASE BILL ME 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
I 



Page 24 Tli« Quiauiy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



Allied Insurance To Offer 

Registry Of Motor Vehicles 

Services At Quincy Office 



Bank Of Canton, Marshall School 
In Community Partnership 



Waiting in long lines at of Allied American Insur- ices in the near future, 
the Registiy of Motor Vehi- ance Agency, Inc., as the Customers coming into 
des wUI soon be a thing of agency gears up to offer a ihe Allied Amencan office 
the past for many customers magnitude of registry serv- at 382 Quincy Ave, Quincy 

*^ Will soon be able to acquire Elementary 

personal and commercial Quincy Point. 




wmmm 



t^lHJMJCHEARINO 




The Bank of Canton's 
Quincy Banking Center 
recently entered into a 
Quincy School-Community 
Partnership with the 
Clifford H. Marshall 
School 



lationships for participa- 
ting businesses and 
schools. The objectives of 
this particular partnership 
include acquainting stu- 



well-planned curriculum. 
With a parent's per- 
mission. The Bank of 
Canton will open joint 
passbook accounts for all 



in 



dents with the banking participating students, 
industry and the recent Bank representatives will 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



plates, register new, used or 
leased vehicles, transfer 
existing registrations and 
make vehicle and title in- 
quires. Allied American is 



CASE NO. 99-048 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY one of 10 agencies to take 

WU/V/C/PALCODEasamended, the Quincy Zoning Board part in this pilot program „....„g^ aiuu^u.o «..« - ^ 

of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, designed to shorten lines at Higgins, School Principal understanding of the bank' 

JULY 13, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the the Registry of Motor Vehi- Philip Connolly, School services. 



Present at the signing of 
the partnership were Bank 
of Canton Vice President 
of Operations Peter Shea 
and Assistant Vice 
President and Branch 
Manager Michelle 



technological advances 
that have been made in 
the industry, teaching 
students the importance 
and basics of money 
management, and pro- 
viding both parents and 
students with a better 



Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of JOSEPH DONAHUE 
for a APPEAL OF THE DECISION OF THE BUILDING 
INSPECTOR for the issuance of Building Permit 121563 in 
accordance with Title 1 7 as amended CHAPTER 1 7.01 .1 20 
(ADMINISTRATION). CHAPTER 17.20 (DIMENSIONAL 
REQUIREMENTS), on the premises numbered 950 EAST 
SQUANTUM STREET, SQUANTUM. 

Edmund Q'Leary. Chairman 

6/24. 7/1/99 



cies 



Supt. Eugene Creedon, and 

Executive Director of the 
"Instead of having our cus- Quincy School-Community 
tomers go to the registry, we partnership, Arthur J. 
bring the registry to our Keough. 
customers," says Meg j^^ ^^.^^^ g^^^^,. 

Somerville, personal lines Community Partnership and the implementation of 
marketing manager of the p „, connects bus- the Saving Makes "Cents" 



services. 

Beginning in the fall, 
planned activities may 
include bank officers 
visiting selected fifth 
grade classes, field trips to 
the to the Bank of Canton 



HOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



Quincy office. 

Allied American Insur- 
ance Agency President 
Hope Aldrich says the 
added services will become 
a permanent part of what 
Allied American offers its 
customers. 



"It's a win-win situa- 
tion," she says. "The regis- 
try benefits because they 
will have shorter lines, we 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-047 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 

MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 

of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 

JULY 13, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 

Council Chambers. Quincy City Hall. 1305 Hancock Street. ^^^ ^^^j^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

Quincy. MA02169. On the application of PAUL GALLAGHER valuable services to our 

for a SPECIAL PERMIT/VARIANCE to cons^^^^^^^^ J ^^^ ^^^ ^^^,^^_ 

apartrpent buildmg in violation of Title 17 as amended j^ 

CHAPTER 1 7.16 (USE REGULATIONS). CHAPTER 1 7.20 J^^^J'^fh oL .TsH^^^ 
(DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS). CHAPTER 17.28 ^^^^^ ^"^ °"^ ""'"' *^ ^^" 
(LOCATION AND LAYOUT OF PARKING FACILITIES) on 
the premises numbered 86 EAST HOWARD STREET, 
QUINCY POINT. 

Edmund Q'Leary, Chairman 

6/24, 7/1/99 



inesses, community ser- 
vice agencies, and 
institutions of higher 
education with individual 
Quincy schools, to form 
mutually beneficial re- 



Saving 
program. 

The Saving Makes 
"Cents" program is de- 
signed to teach children 
the basics of money 
management through a 



collect deposits, make 
appropriate passbook 
entries, and return the 
passbooks to the classroom 
teacher for safekeeping. As 
an added incentive, the 
Bank will donate $5 for 
the child's first deposit. At 
the end of the program, the 
passbooks will be returned 
to students and they will 
be on their way to saving 
for their first car of their 
college tuitions. 

"This partnership is 
indicative of Bank of 
Canton's strong 

commitment to the com- 
munity, and we look 
forward to working with 
the students and faculty of 
the Clifford H. Marshall 
Elementary School," said 
Higgins. 



Decision Awaited On 
Raytheon Plant's Fate 

(Cont'd from page 3) ing the plant would be company layed off 1,200 

want to know what will against an agreement with workers and closed the 
happen to the 600 Quincy the union that helped Ray- Waltham plant. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-049 



as many other services. 

Somerville says the pro- 
gram will start when com- 
puter software allowing ac- 
cess to the Registry of Mo- 
tor Vehicles' computer da- 
tabase is installed at the end 

of July. 



workers. theon receive an $8 million 

tax break from the state. 

Last month, Daniel 

Bumham, chief executive of The union says it ex- 

Raytheon, said the company pected Raytheon to add 

is considering selling or more jobs to the state in 

closing the Quincy plant. exchange for its support. 

Union leaders say clos- Instead, the union says, the 



Raytheon contends it 
made no promise regarding 
any specific number of 
workers in Massachusetts. 
Officials say they promised 
to maintain the payroll at 90 
percent of the 1995 level 
and indicate they have. 



Registry services pro- 
vided by Allied will be 
available during the same 



Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY hours the Quincy branch is 



MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 13, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy. MA 02169. On the application of Zl FENG U for a 
APPEAL OF THE DECISION OF THE BUILDING 
INSPECTOR/FINDING in denying permit and find, if 
necessary, the use of one store in the shopping center for a 
Chinese buffet restaurant would not be substantially more 
detrimental to the neighborhood in accordance with Title 17 
as amended CHAPTER 17.04.120 (ADMINISTRATION), 
CHAPTER 17.16 (USE REGULATIONS). CHAPTER 17.24 
(NONCONFORMANCE) on the premises numbered 277 
QUINCY AVENUE, QUINCY. 

Edmund O'Leary. Chairman 

6/24. 7/1/99 

NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



open, from 8 a.m. 
p.m. weekdays. 



to 5:30 



REPORT 

STRECT UGHT 

OUTAGES 

24 hours, 
7days 

376-1490 



Patrick Halloran Selected 
For * Super Dad Award' 

Patrick Halloran, 85 Dar- Freddy wrote, "I have to tell ends at their house. And he 

row St., Quincy, was re- you what a great Dad I think yells at me just Jike a dad 

cently selected a "Super my cousin Patrick Halloran and not a cousin." 

Dad Award" winner by the is to his son Justin Halloran The Super Dads celebra- 

and me. ^^on featured free, hands-on 

interactive fun for the fam- 
"Patrick spends a lot of ily, and lots of raffle prizes 
time with Justin and me. and freebies. Activities in- 
When Patrick takes Justin to eluded a Velcro obstacle 
his hockey or baseball course, a New England 
games he takes me, too. We aquarium tidepool, basket- 
all go to the movies, fishing, ball, golf and fly fishing 
Father's Day celebration on to the beach, sledding and clinics as well as video 
the Boston Common. just hanging around. games set up by Blockbuster 

Halloran was nominated "We clean the yard, he Video, 

for the award by 11-year-old plays ball with us. Next nrovided 

Freddy Smith of Quincy. In winter he Wants me to leam ^^^'o Disney provided 
nominating Halloran, to ski. I get to spend week- 



For Fathering Project at The 
Medical Foundation. 

Halloran received three 
free Blockbuster movie 
rentals, a special Super Dad 
T-shirt, a certificate and 
public recognition as "Dads 
Make a Difference-a free 



music entertainment. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-050 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 1 7 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 13, 1999. at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers. Quincy City Hall. 1305 Hancock Street. 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of THE STOP & SHOP 
SUPERMARKET COMPANY for a SPECIAL PERMIT 
FLOOD PLAIN/VARIANCE for the redevelopment of the 
existing Stop & Shop plaza. The project includes the 
demolition of an existing bank and a residential structure and 
the expansion of the existing supermarket building, to 
accommodate a 81 .106 square foot stand alone Super Stop 
& Shop Supermarket. Additional site work includes the 
reconstruction of the parking lot, the upgrade of the site" 
stormwater nfwnagement system, utility improvements, and 
landscaping In vk)latk)n of Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 
17.20 (DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS), CHAPTER 17.28 
(PARKING AND LOADING REQUIREMENTS), CHAPTER 
17 40 (FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT) on the premises numbered 
496 SOUTHERN ARTERY/MCGRATH HKIHWAY. QUINCY. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chairman 

6/24. 7/1/99 . 



INVITATION TO BID 



INVrTATKHiTO BIO 



Zl 



JULY 15, 1999 @ 10:30 A.M. 
JULY 15, 1999 @ 10:45 A.M. 
JULY 15, 1999 @ 11:00 A.M. 
JULY 15, 1999 @ 11:15 A.M. 



IMVITATIQN TO BID 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
1305 HANCOCK ST. QUINCY, MA 021 69 
Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of Quincy: 
SEWER, WATER & DRAIN SALE OF USED WATER METERS 

SCHOOL DEPT HEALTH SUPPUES 

INSPECTIONAL SERVICES DEMOUTION OF STRUCTURE 

PUBUC WORKS/SCHOOL PAINTING OF (7) SCHOOLS 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy. 
Massachusetts, 021 69, between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable discounts. Bids/Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope (which is supplied). Tbe outside of the sealed envelope is to be clearly marked "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date 

of bid call. 

Firm bid prices wiH be given first consideration. Bids/Proposals will be received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until 
the time and date stated above, at whrch time and date they will be publicly opened and read. Late Bids/Proposals, delivered 
by mail or in person, will be rejected. ■ ««* 

If applicable. Bids shall be in accordance with Chapter 149 of the M.G.L as amended. M.G.L. Chapter 39, sectoon 39A. 
39B and 39F-R. M.G.L. Chapter 1 49. Section 26. 27, 29, 35 and 44A-44M. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bkJs or to accept any part of a bid or the one deenried best for the City, and waive 

any informalities in the bkkiing, if it is in the best interest of the City to do so. 
' James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

Alfred J. Graztoso. Jr., PURCHASING AGENT 

7/1/99 



"X " 



Tk*n<a)r,Mjrl,IM> ThaQalBoy 



n«e25 



Board Cracks Down 
On Junk Yard Hours 



Corrections Center 



(Cont'd from page I) 
Goyettc. a friend of 
Sugarman, after a hand 
shake that a meeting will 
be arranged. 

Sugarman said he was 
trying to keep the dust 
from bothering the 
neighbors by watering it 



down, but blamed the dry 
weather on the dust 
continuing to be a 
problem. 

He said he had hoped 
the city sweepers would 
take care of some of the 
dust on Rodman St. a side 
street to the junk yard. 



He said there was a pot 
hole that he plans to fix 
because it was creating a 
lot of the dust as trucks 
rode over it. 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman suggested all of 
the dumpsters be covered 
with a tarp. 



Partially Open 



(Cont'd from page I) 
tion will be offered at the 

community corrections cen- 
ter too, he said. That entails 
probationers wearing elec- 
tronic bracelets, he said. 

The office of community 
corrections was created by 



legislation in 1996 within 
the administrative office of 
the trial court. Harder ex- 
plained. The court works in 
consultation with the De- 
partment of Probation, the 

Department of Correction, 
the Parole Board and the 



county sheriffs to ensure 
consistency between sen- 
tencing guidelines and com- 
munity corrections. 

An added touch is that 
the Norfolk County Sher- 
iffs Office is maintaining 
the nearby traffic island. 



UEQALN0T1CC 



LEQALNO 



CIT/0FQUI^4CY 

IN COUNCIL , 

ORDER NO. 98-273 

ORDERED: September 8, 1998 

Be it ordained by ttie City Council of the City of Ouincy that the Revised Ordinarices of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 1 0. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1 0:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. VthiclM - Riding 
• Restrictions - Excsptions. 




^^^WBWJi^ 



LEGAL NOTICE 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

'NO THROUGH TRUCKS' sians to be installed on Roberts StrBst. 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9, 1999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 98-278 

ORDERED: September 8, 1 998 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 1 0. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1 0:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. Vehiclos - Riding 
• Restrictions - Exceptions. 



APP THE FOLLOWING: 

'NO THROUGH TRUCKS' signs to be installed on Brook Road. 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9. 1999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-131 

ORDERED: May 17, 1999 

Amending Traffic Regulations establishing a NO PARKING zone on the even numbered 
side of Hanington Avenue from the intersection of Main Street and l-iarrington Avenue up to 
and including 56 Harrington Avenue. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7. 1 999 

ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9, 1999 

James A Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 

7/1/99 



LEGAL NOTICE 



-,v 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-134 

ORDERED: May 17, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 



ADAMS STREET 



EASTBOUND BURGIN PARKWAY 



TYPE REGULATION 
NO TURN ON RED 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BC ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1 999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9. 1999 

James A Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Hallsen, Assistant City Qerfc 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 98-277 

ORDERED: September 8. 1 998 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as anriended, be further amended as follows: 

in Title 1 0. Vehicles and Traffk:. Chapter 1 0:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. Vehicles - Riding 
• Restrictions - Exceptions. 

APP THE FOLLOWING: 

'NO THROUGH TRUCKS' signs to be installed on Penn Street 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9. 1999 

James A Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/1/99 



J 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-082 

ORDERED: April 5, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Courteil of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 1 0. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1 0:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBEEI QlBECIIQIl 

WILSON AVE. EASTBOUND 



FARRINGTON ST 



TYPEREGULATIQW 
NO LEFT TURN 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9, 1999 

James A Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assi^ant City Clerk 



LEGAL NOnCS 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-129 

ORDERED: May 17, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

STREET 

Quincy Shore Dr. 



QiBEdlfill 
Southbound 



PontlacRd. 



TYPE REGULATION 
No Left Turn 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9, 1999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 






LEGAL N0T1CI 




CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-133 

ORDERED: May 17, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffto. Chapter 10:08. RULES OF THE ROAD. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBEEI ubechqh 

BURGIN PKWY. NORTHBOUND 



ADAMS STREET 



TYPE REGULATION 
NO TURN ON RED 



7/1/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9. 1999 

Jwnes A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Halsan. Assistant City Clerk 



Page 26 TIm Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1 51 SEP 

Estate of ROY E. 

HENDRICKSON 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ANNE M. 
CONNOLLY of RANDOLPH 
In the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executrix, 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 04, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham'tfiis day, 6/22/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P0685EP 

Estate of PHILIP E. 

PETERS, JR. 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JOHN D. 
PETERS of BOSTON In the 
County of SUFFOLK be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 28, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day. 6/1 8/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 



][ 



LEQAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1509EP 

Estate of LILLIAN A. 

MASTRICOLA 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JAMES M. 
O'SULLIVAN of 

WESTWOOD In the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 25, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 6/22/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1389EP 
Estate of JOHN J. 

CALLAHAN 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DAVID A. 
CALLAHAN of HOLLAND In 
the State of PENNSYLVANIA 
be appointed executor, 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 21, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire. First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day. 6/8/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 



Give. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heait 
AssodadooJ 



« 



Three Harbor Express Employees 
Honored For Rescue At Sea 



Three Harbor Express 
employees were recently 
honored by the U.S. Coast 
Guard for a rescue at sea. 

The awards were pre- 
sented during the Port of 
Boston's annual maritime 
dinner sponsored by the 
Propeller Club of Boston. 

On Sept. 14, 1998, Capt. 
Andrew Geagan, in com- 
mand of the Harbor Ex- 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 94P1044AA 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Alfred J. 
Hubbard, late of Quincy, in 
the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of Laura Silver 
Traiger as Administrator (the 
fiduciary) of said estate has 
been presented to said Court 
for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the twenty-first day of 
July, 1 999, the return day of 
this citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be sen/ed upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this eleventh day of 
June, 1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 



press, high speed ferry 
"Flying Cloud" and crew 
members Matthew Dillon 
and Kate Wall were pre- 
paring to depart the Quincy 
terminal of Harbor Express 
when they received a call 
from the attendant stationed 
at the Fore River Bridge. 
According to the attendant, 
an elderly man had just 
fallen from the top of the 65 
foot high bridge. 

Capt. Geagan maneu- 
vered the vessel in close to 
the bridge pilings while 
Dillon and Wall sported the 
man clinging to the bridge 
abutment in 46-degree wa- 
ter. Geagan maneuvered in 
close while Wall rigged the 
emergency gear and set up 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1187EP 
Estate of DENNIS DIVER 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that MARY C. 
CORKERY of HINGHAM In 
the County of PLYMOUTH 
be appointed executrix, 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 04, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 6/22/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/1/99 



communications. 

Dillon then climbed onto 
the bridge structure and 
down to the water level 
where he was able to get a 
hold on the man, keeping 
him from sinlcing. Within 
minutes, the Weymouth fire 
department was able to 
launch a small rescue boat 
with rescue drivers and 
paramedics on board who 
relieved Dillon. The man 
was transported to the beach 
and on to the hospital where 
he recovered. 

For placing himself at 
potential risk in effecting 
the rescue, Dillon received 
the coveted U.S. Coast 
Guard Public Service 
Award. Geagan and Wall 
received letters of commen- 
dations for their efforts. 

This is the second year in 



a row that Harbor Express 
employees have been hon- 
ored by the U.S. Coast 
Guard. In 1997, a different 
crew onboard the Flying 
Cloud rescued passengers 
off of a vessel operated by 
another ferry company, 
Boston Hartx>r Cruises. 

The Boston Harbor 
Cruises vessel had suffered 
an engine room fire and was 
left drifting in the pre-dawn 
commuter hours. In this 
case the Harbor Express 
employees maneuvered the 
Flying Cloud along side the 
burning vessel and safely 
evacuated all of the passen- 
gers then stood by with fire- 
fighting equipment until 
relieved by the U.S. Coast 
Guard. All three crew re- 
ceived the Public Service 
award. 



Ellen Wilson Clinical Director 
At Beechwood Counseling 



Ellen Bartlett Wilson, 
L.l.C.S.W. is now Clinical 
Director of Beechwood 
Counseling Services. 

Wilson, who received her 
MSW from Smith College 
School for Social Work, has 
been in private practice as a 
therapist in the South Shore 
area for the past four years 
and is the president of In- 



formed Choices, Inc., The 
Mental Health Information 
and Referral Network of 
New England. 

Beechwood Counseling 
Services, located in Quincy 
for the past 21 years, re- 
cently completed its first 
year in its current location at 
22 Spear Street, Quincy 
Center. 



NOTICE OF PUBUC INVOLVEMENT PLAN MEETING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PLAN MEETING 

FORMER C J. PARTNERSHIP PROPERTY 

REAR 221-227 QUINCY AVENUE 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

DEP RTN: 3-1902 

Bethlehem Steel Corporation received a petition from 
residents in Quincy, Massachusetts requesting this location 
be designated as a Public Involvement Plan site, in 
accordance with MGL C.21E [14(a)]. This law requires that, 
upon receiving such a petition, a plan for involving the public 
in decisions regarding remedial response actions must be 
prepared and a public meeting to present the proposed plan 
held. 

Bethlehem Steel Corporation designated this site as a 
Public Involvement Plan (PIP) site on May 13, 1999. A public 
meeting will be held at the Community Room in the Roche 
Brothers Supermarket at 101 Falls Boulevard in Quincy, 
Massachusetts on July 15, 1999 at 7 p.m. to present the 
draft Public Involvement Plan, and to provide an update on 
planning for remedial actions at the site. Copies of the draft 
Public Involvement Plan will be made available at the meeting. 

Any questions regarding this meeting or the Public 
Involvement Plan should be directed to Ms. Anne L. Leifer, 
Assistant Project Manager, GEI Consultants, Inc., 1021 Main 
Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 01890 at (781) 721-4000. 
7/1/99 



UEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



3 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-128 
ORDERED: May 17, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1993, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 1 0. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1 0:20. Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 1 0:20:40. Parking prohibited and 
restricted where: A list of specific locations where parking is prohibited or restricted is on file in the Office of the City Clerk. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBSEI SIDE 

SQUANTO RD. NORTH 



SQUANTO RD. 



NORTH 



QUINCY 

SHORE 

DRIVE 

• 

50 FT. WEST 
OF QUINCY 
SHORE DRIVE 



m 

50 FT. WEST 
OF QUINCY 
SHORE DRIVE 

70 FT. WEST 
OF QUINCY 
SHORE DRIVE 



TYPe REGULATION 
NO PARKING 



HANDICAPPED 
PARKING ONLY 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 7, 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 9, 1999 

James A Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY. 



r 



Pag? 27 




FOR RENT 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



A NEW HALL 

Elks Lan«. off 254 Quarry SL 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCY ELKS 

847-6149 



TF 



Ex^utlvB Lawn Can 

Landscape Maintenance 

and Constaiction 
Spring and Fall Cleanups 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Brian (617) 268-1088 m 



Sullivan Tne SbtvIcb 

Pruning, Removals, Stump 
Grinding. Mass Certified 
Aborist. 20 years exp. Crane 
Service. Firewood. Full ins. 
472-3595. m» 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 

K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 
For Information Phaa* Call 

7e7-<ai9 



Tf 



The Bryan Room VFW 
24 Broad St, Quincy 

2 rooms available. 
Large room 400-t- 
small room 150 guests. 
1-800-474-6234 tf 



Attics Cleaned Out 

Old Furniture & Trunks of 
Contents Etc. removed. 
Low senior citizen rates. 
Call Joe at 617-328-3844 

•23 



MAJ Residential Services 

Interior • Exterior painting, car- 
pentry, gutter services, 
yardwork, cleanouts & all re- 
lated handyman services. Free 
estimates. Mike 328-8648 7/« 



FLYNN 

SEALCOATING 

All Work Done 

by Brush 

No Sprays 

Quality Work 

Free Estimates 

617-471-6802 



■/12 



A & T VACUUM 

• $19.95 OvtrtMul Special 
on any vKuum. 

• Sawing machlna repairing 

• VCR rtpairing and daaning 

• Sharpening 
(tdssort, knives, ate.) 

•Crack XL Vacuums $249 

• Eltctrolux w/powar nozzle $1 99 

• Used vacuuma $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 Tf 



Your South Shore 
l^eadquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




WAN 



P« 



FOR SALE 



88 Restaurant 

653 Southern Artery, 
Quincy. MA 02169 

Call Now 
(617) 786-9973 „» 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, damps, tool chests, okl 
h£mdtools, all trades (machin 
ist, pattern maker, watchmaker, 
etc.) shop tots. Also, antk^uar- 
ian t)ooks, frames, paintings, 
crocks, lantems. Antiques in 
estate tots. 1-617-558-3839 tf 



HELP WANTED 



STOP EARNING MONEY 

FOR OTHER PEOPI^. 

Build your own financial future 
through Market America's 
"Unfranchise" the most power- 
ful business opportunity of the 
90's & t>eyond. For more infor- 
mation call Robert & Oanmara 
1-800-211-1202x02609 7/22 



Quincy Detox 

Orderly Position 

Driver's license required. Excel- 
lent benefits. $9.32 days $9.72 
evenings, $10.05 weekend & 
nights. Call L^ura 472-8060. 7/1 



PERSONAL 



Thank you 
St Jude 

for favors granted 



D.C 7/11 



Aluminum Christmas 
trees any color or size. 

Also, revolving tree 

stands and rotating color 

wheels, will pay cash. 

781-848-9623 w«. 



WANTED TO PURCHASE 



Wanted to Purchase 
Quincy business with 
sales of250K+ Call 617- 
471-0533 ask for Dave 
or leave message. 



rn 



FRED'S HANDYMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re- 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 



7/1 



MASTER 
ELECTRICIAN 

Uc#13685A 

Call Basil 
617'471'9067 7.5 



SHOPlocAuyl 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

The One Stop Service Company 
We Sen/ice & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • ReskJential Air Conditioning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

Sem:e . . . Ws Our Only Business tf 

Annual Tune Ups $60, Includes nozzle A oil filter 
617-472-8641 24 hour Emtrgency Sarvica Jerry LaRamme 



CEDRONE TREE & LANDSCAPE 

Professional Landscape Construction & Maintenance 



flOOMMATE WANTED 



Beautiful 3 bedroom Home, 
N.Q. Walnut St., Off Newport 
Ave., Own bedroom with 
doset, shared living room, kit., 
bath. $450/mo. +1 mo. sec. 
dep. Pien-e 61 7-745-0883 m 



SAUES 



Avon Products 

Start a home-based busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. 
Call toll free (888) 561- 
2866. tea 



News Reporters 

General Assignment 

Full and Paii-Tlme 




1372 Hancocl( St., Quincy, MA 02169 
Call 617-471-3100 



Installation 

Removal 

Tree pruning & Removal 

Stump Grinding 

Lot Clearing 



• Mulch Delivery 

• Shrub Trimming 

• Bobcat Service 

• Lawn and Property 
Clean-ups. 

*Competitive Prices -Professional Workmanship* 

Fully Insured - Free EstlmatesI 

Call NOW 61 7-479-0474 



7/15 



Bruce of Ail Trades 

Cement work (masonry), Land- 
scaping (cleanups, etc.). Paint- 
ing (int. & ext.), Capentry. Call 
for free estimates (781) 986- 
9668or (781) 681-9983 



7/15 



Photography 
by Sean 

Weddings, Engagements 

and Portraits 

SEAN RILEY 

781-337-7707 



7/1 



Dodd's Disposal 

Complete Cleanout Service 

Residential-Commercial 
Rut>t>ish piles, fumiture and appli- 
ance rernoval, cellars, attics, yards. 
Free Estimates 781 -888-41 41 7/a 



J.D. PETERS 
FENCE CONTRACTOR 

Wood, Chain Link 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Jim 617-773-3391 «> 



hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franklin Street 
South Quincy « 472-1710 




CUDDAHY 

CUSTOM 

BUILDERS 

Residential & Commercial 

RerTKxieling Kitchens, Baths, 

Decks, Siding. Replacement 

WirKlows, Doors. 

Roofing & Painting. 

Interior/Exterior. Ucensed/lnsured 

781-383^785 ^ 



Cameron Cleaning 
& Gardening 

House cleaning & garden 
work. Free job estimates. For 
sen^ices please call Georgia 
at (617) 471-5543 



am 



KEITH'S PAINTING SERVICE 

Interior & Exterior 

Ceilings & Walls Repaired 

1 Booking Available for July 

Still Booking for August 

All Calls Returned Within 24 Hours 

781-834-1229 orToll Free Pager 781 -379-0528 t. 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Service 

• Expert Busti & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced 
EB££ Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Ucensed, Insured 
Free Estinriates 



MARag.«116180 



TF 



/aUpuper ana f-itiniina 
ou Ihg /-"aperoou 

Gerard Shea 

Gradimfot US School of Prof$»- 

skMM/ PapfT Hanging, Rutland, VT 

617-471-5089 



Graphic Artist 

Part-Time 

Computer Skills Required 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
Call 617-471-3100 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodadooJ 








MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
Q Autos 
Q Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

G Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 
Q Real Estate 
Q Antiques 

G Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
Q Instruction 
Q Day Care 
Q Personal 

Q Miscellaneous 



RATES 

1 WEEK Q $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

lOc for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 10c each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS Q $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8-12 insertions 

of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE C 

Q Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



$4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADUNE: MONDAY, 5:00PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Pagc28 TlM QulnosrSua TVrwfaiy, July 1, 1999 



Law Office of 

Chistolinl & DeSimoney EC. 



Personal Injury 

• Lead Poisoning • Medical Malpractice 

• Slip and Fall • Negligent Security 

• Automobile Accidents • Death Claims 

• Product Liability • Injuries to children 

• Exposure to toxic substances 
Law Office of 

Chistolini & DeSimoney PC. 
(617) 984-0021 

• Free Consultation 
• Home or Office Visits 

21 McGrath Highway, Suite 201 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



Four New Restaurants 
Moving Toward Opening 




There will soon be more 
choices on where to eat in 
Quincy as four new 
restaurants updated their 
progress at Tuesday's 
License Board meeting. 

At the onset of the 
meeting. Chairman Joseph 
Shea said the board would 
be "breaking for the 
summer" and required all 
the restaurants to give 
updates before the break. 

John Boyd, part owner 
of Louis' Cafe on Sea 
Street, now being called 
Louis' Crossing said the 
building is secured and 
most of the electricity and 
plumbing was completed. 
He said the shingles and 
staining were next and that 
"everything" is on sche- 
dule. 

Boyd said he hoped for 
completion and opening in 
late August. 

Shea said he had seen 
the new building and that 
it was in "keeping with the 
neighborhood, and very 



attractive." 

Shea read a letter from 
owner of the X and O 
European Trattoria, 1384 
Hancock St. in which 
Marianthi Gregoriades, 
owner said the renovations 
should be completed in 
July with an opening in 
mid-August. 

Roger Wallin, building 
inspector said the X and O 
had not taken a certificate 
from the Historic 
Commission for the 
signage or a permit for the 
awnings. 

Maralin Manning, 
executive director of the 
Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Asso- 
ciation said the restaurant 
is 85 to 90 percent 

completed and looks 
"completely changed". She 
said the problem with the 
signage is that the names 
of the company cannot be 
mentioned in the sign 
more than three times, and 



1999 SATURN SLl 







DOWN 
LEASE 



Lease For 



$229 



Per month 



'0 



39 MONTH LEASE 

INCLUDES ALL TAXES AND FEES. NO FIRST PAYMENT, 
NO PAYMENT DUE UNTIL SECOND PAYMENT. 



Auto, Air Cond. 



r — — •COUPON- — — • 

CUSTOMER 

APPRECIATION 

COUPON 

$500 OFF 

ANY USED CAR IN STOCK 

Thursday, July 1- 
Sunday, July 4 

You must pnsunt this coupon. 

Oho por tustomot. 

Cannot bo usod with othor 

discounts or pmmotlons. 

L...C0UPON- — — J 

Pmh. bosed on 1 99? Sotutn SLl incldg outo, o/c & transportation with MSRP of SI 3,680. No first poynieflt due until swond poyment. All tow ond »« induded. 20 amts par odditional mile. Option to pordHise ot loose end for $7,524. Monthly payments 
lotol $8,931. Primary lender must opprove leose. 

USED CARS /rom SATURN 





SATIRN. 





*93 SATURN 
SLl SEDAN 

Aulo, AM-FM Stereo #S0476A 

- $7,495 


'95 SATURN 
SLl SEDAN 

A/C, AM-FM Stereo, cass. #S0E44 

$7,995 




*94 SATURN SW2 
WAGON 

A/CAM/FM Stereo. #SOE34 

$7,995 


'94 SATURN ST 2 
SEDAN 

Aulo, A/C AM-FM Stereo. #SOE59 

$8,495 


'95 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

A/C AM-FM Stereo, cassclle, pw/pl, alloys. ISQESl 

$8,495 


'96 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

Auto, A/C AM-FM Stereo. #SQE49 

$10,495 


*96 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

A/C.pw/pl,aulo.#SQE29 

$10,995 


*97 SATUIW SCI 
COUPE 

A/C, AM-FM Stereo, cassette, r. spoiler. #SOB08 

$10,995 


'96 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

A/C, p., AM-FM Stereo, 38k. #SQE39 

$10,995 


'96 SATUIUS SC2 
COUPE 

A/C pw/pl. AM-FM Stereo cassette. #SQE50 

$10,995 


*97 SATURN ST 2 
SEDAN 

Aulo, pw/pl, AM-FM Stoto casselte. ISQESS 

$11,495 


*97 SATURN ST 2 
SEDAN 

Aulo, A/C AM-FM Sleieo. IASO420A 

$11,995 


'97 CHEVY 
MALIBU SEDAN 

Auto, A/Cpw/pl. AM-FM stereo cass. ISQE47 

$11,995 


'97 SATURN SLl 
COUPE 

Auto. A/C AM-FM cass., r. spoiler. «9SQ428A 

$12,195 


*96 SATURN SC2 
COUPE 

pw/pl, A/C, AM-FM Slcieo, cassJS0546 

$12,495 


'97 SATURN 
SC2 COUPE 

VCalhkidliiikei,io)f«kdi, AM4llttRalS0S41 

$12,995 


'97 SATURN SCI 
COUPE 

Auto, A/C AM-FM Stereo cass. «SOS29 

$12,995 


'96 DODGE 
GR CARAVAN 

Aula; A/C po/^ 3iri m, AM-FM Sttm^ caK ISQEZ7 

$13,995 




A DIFFERENT KIND o/COMPANY. A DIFFERENT KIND of CAR. 

Saturn of Quincy 

Pumace Biook Pkwy., Quincy, MA Exit 8, Southeast Expressway 

Please visit our web site: www.satuniofqiiincyu»iii 

617-328-1000 

SAl£HOUKS:M<ym9-9.FR9^SA9-6,SUNl2'5 SERVICS HOURS: 7:30-5:30, liON'FIU:0FBN WED. MGHrTB.Sni 




there were too many X's 
and O's on the sign. She 
added "too many hugs and 
kisses." 

Atty. Edward Fleming, 
representing Joseph 
Cnignale, owner of the 
Naked Fish on Adams St. 
barring no major delays, 
there were planning to 
open the restaurant July 
26. 

Shea, who said the 
restaurant business in the 
city was "going through 
lots of changes" said he 
was "excited at the 
complete make-over" at 
the former Hollow 
Restaurant and said when 
he visited the site, it was 
"entirely different." 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman explained that 
when they were tearing 
down the walls, con- 
sstructural defects from a 
previous fire changed the 
whole scope of the 
renovation 

Shea read a letter from 
Dan Flynn, owner of 
Walsh's Restaurant who 
said that because of some 
managerial problems, the 
establishment would not 
be open until early 
September. 

Gorman said all other 
restaurants 'seem to be on 
track" and requested that 
Flynn appear at the July 
meeting for another 
update. 

City 
Budget 
$165 M 

(Cont'd from page 1) 

council would be setting a 
dangerous precedent by not 

appropriating money for the 
various parades and other 
celebrations. 

"The parades are one 
way to get people into 
Quincy, to shop, to see the 
beauty of the city, the events 
in the park. It's money well 
spent." 

Cahill, who is chairman 
of the finance committee, 
said the mayor presented a 
tight budget, with no posi- 
tions to cut. "Basically it's 
the same budget [as last 
year's] with cost of living 
adjustments." 

He suggested that if the 
cut was to prevail, the coun- 
cillors could make up the 
difference by contributing 
from their own campaign 
funds or from their own 
pockets. 

Ward 2 Councillor Dan- 
iel Raymondi said he had 
previously voted against the 
cut because the celebrations 
focused on the city's diver- 
sity and history and em- 
braced hundreds of volun- 
teers. 

In an effort to cl(»e out 
the city's boc^ the coun- 
cilors appropriated another 
$605,000 for various ex- 
penses. The sums were 
transferred from several 
other departments. 



^ 



I 

Historic Quincy 




THE DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



A Special Supplement 




Thursday, ]uly U 1999 



Page 2A Tl&« Qixlxioy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 




Office of the Mayor 



TOetcome to ^Istotlc Q^ulnc^ 



To John Hancock, John Adams and John Quincy Adams, Quincy was home. It was that "re- 
markable spot" John Adams referred to when he wrote to Abigail from Europe. 

Standing on Penn s Hill with her son, John Quincy, watching smoke from the Battle of Bunker 
Hill, Abigail Adams may have sensed that this "remarkable spot" would produce national 
leaders and have an impact on American History for centuries to come. 

With twenty-seven miles of seashore on the East and nestled into the beautiful Blue Hills on the 
West, Quincy, with its peninsula communities, has the character of a town and not a city. 

Visit the Adams National Historical sites, including the birthplaces of two Presidents and their 
summer home. Enter the beautiful United First Parish Church where the two Presidents and 
their wives are entombed. 



// 



Truly, John Adams was correct when he said of Quincy, "It is a most remarkable spot. 
I welcome you to the City of Quincy. Enjoy its beauty and history. 

Sincerely, 

^ JAMES A. SHEETS 
MAYOR 



Thunday, July 1,1999 TIm Qulaoy Sua Pii|c3A 



Just The Wai; Abigail Wanted It 

John Adams Birthplace Has Original Look 



The birthplace of John Adams, 
second president of the United 
States, looks like it did when he 
and his parents. Deacon John 
and Susanna lived there. 

It took on that "as it was" look after a 
painstaking six-year reconstructkMi project 
in the 1980s. 

Visitors to the John Adams Birthplace, 
which peers over the shoulder of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace on Franklin St. , 
South Quincy, can now see more com- 
pletely how the house looked. 

The house is well-furnished and looks 
like it did when John and Abigail lived in 
it. 

The final renovation touches were to 
the room where Deacon John Adams 
made shoes. 

The rooms are furnished from the pe- 
riod of Deacon John and his wife and 
probably reflected her taste. They are fur- 
nished not elaborately, but sufficiently to 
have a lived-in look. 

The birthplace was probably built in the 
late 17th or early 18th Century for less 
than $ 1 ,000 in the pounds of the day and 
the clapboards were hand-hewn from 
trees that grew in its fiekls. 

The pine clapboards of the John 
Adams Birthpbce are un(>ainted and the 
U.S. National Park Service, which re- 
stored the house, insists that based on 
research the house will remain that way, 
despite the fact that John Adams was 
known to ha\je preferred it white. 

For more than 80 years they were the 
little red farmhouses at the foot of Penn's 
Hill. But research turned up the fact that 
Abigail Adams, the wife of the second 
president, wanted them "stone" and white 
in color. 

Since what Abigail wanted, Abigail usu- 
ally got, in the summer of 1980, the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace was repainted 
to Abigail's taste, the "stone" color deter- 
mined to be a sort of off-white mixed es- 
p>ecially for the occasion from a late 18th 
Century formula. 

The John Adams Birthplace was 
painted white so that both houses wouJd 
look as they dki in 1807, the year tlie leist 
Adams lived in them, but later research 
indk:ated it was unpaint^. 

The birthplaces, parts of whk:h date 
back to the 17tii Century, were taken over 
by the National Park Service on May 1, 
1979 after years of semi-neglect due to 
lack of restoratk)n and maintenance fuikls. 
The John Quincy Adams Birthpbce re- 
opened in 1982 for the first time in three 
years after undergoing a $175,000 re- 
habilitation faithful to the lives of the 
prominent family that Uved there. 

If you dk>se your eyes and give your 
HnaginatkMi full refan you can see them 
now as they were more than 200 years 
ago. 

There is Abigail Adams in the new pink 
gingham dress. There is the curly-haired 
infant, Thomas Boylston Adams, bounc- 
ing on his father's knee. And there is John 




Adams, home from the Continental Con- 
gress in Philadelphia for the first time in a 
year, sitting at the table and drinking a 
cup of tea. 

The setting, right down to the pewter 
plates and candlesticks, is reproduced 
faithfully in the corner room of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace, 

The furnishings of the John Quincy 
Adams Birthplace are precise reproduc- 
tions of those that were in the house when 
the second president lived there. The origi- 
nals are at the Old House, the Adams 
National Historic Site, from which they 
cannot be removed under the ownership 
agreement with the Adams family. 

The most interesting room in the .John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace is John Adams' 
oki law office, in which the elder Adams, 
James Bowdoin and Samuel Adams 
drafted the Massachusetts State Consti- 
tution, the model on whk:h the U.S. Con- 
stitutk}n was based. 

The law office is furnished pretty much 
as John Adams had it. 

There is the hutch table on whkrh he 
wrote the State Constitutk>n; the book- 
case filled with books that probably were 
there in John Adams' day, judging by esi 
inventory of his law libreufy; his ok! writ- 
ing desk and two chairs that were copies 
from those in his second bw office in 
Bo^on. 

Pastels of Abigail and John, originally 
done in Saiem, were photographkrally 
reproduced by photographer George Dow 
arxl rK)w hang in Abigail's sitting' room. . 
The originals are in the possesston of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Abigail's okl kitchen cabinet was dis- 
covered serving as a bookcase in the OkJ 
House. 



JOHN ADAMS BIRTHPLACE 

The cabinet was reproduced and in- the blue china that John purchased when 
stalled in the kitchen of the John Quincy he was emissary to Holland. 
Adams Birthpbce along with copies of 



The Adams Birthplaces at 133 and 
141 Fnmklin St. are open daily, in- 
cluding Sundays and holidays, from 
9 aun. to 5 p.m. from April 19 to 
Nov. 10 with guided tours. Admis- 
sion is $2 for adults and children 
oveit 16, u^ich also includes admis- 



sion to the Adams Mansion within 
seven days. Park passes are avail- 
able. Tours must be arranged at the 
Visitors' Center, 1250 Hancock St. 
Last frdl tour leaves Visitors' Center 
at 3:15 p.m. Tours are on a first 
come, first serve basis. 



The Cover 



IT WAS HERE at the 
Quincy Homestead 
that Quincy born 
John Hancock, first 
signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, 
wooed Dorothy 
Quincy and romanti- 
cally declared his 
love for her by 
scratching "You I 
Love And You Alone** 
on a window pane 
wMi a dIanKMid ring 
which can still be 
seen today. The 
homestead is located 
at Hancock St. and 
Butler Rd., Quincy 
Center. 

Harry Brett 
Image Photo 




Page 4A Tlkm Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 




The Adams Cottages 

Our Only Father - Son Presidents Born Here 

It was the North Precinct of Braintrec 
then, a sprawling tract of woods and 
farmlands on the gently rolling hills 
some 10 miles south of the Boston 
Stone along the winding Coast Road to 
Plymouth. 

Something less than 1,500 people 
lived in the North, Middle and South Pre- 
cincts of Braintree in the year 1735 and 
two of them were Deacon John Adams, 
44, farmer and cordwainer, and his wife, 
Susanna, 26. 

Their home was a weathered gray 
farmhouse with a high peaked roof and 
attached lean-to kitchen set on seven acres 
of farmland at roughly Milepost 1 1 of the 
Coast Road, just where it turned up the 
wooded slopes of Penn's Hill toward the 
Monatiquot River ford. 

He was a pillar of his rural commu- 
nity. Mr. Adams was a deacon in the First 
Parish Church, a lieutenant in the 
Braintree militia and a town constable with 
a forceful personality and tact that enabled 
him to collect taxes from his neighbors. 
Ijie was a hard-working farmer whose 

cider was acknowledged best in town, he jqhn QUINCY ADAMS Birthplace (left) and the John Adams BirthpUce. 

worked in leather during the winter 

months, and he had an eye on an adjoin- in the simple house at the foot of Penn's east bedroom of the farmhouse on Oct. one-room shack with fireplace. It was built 
ing piece of farmland, 9 1/2 acres owned Hill when she thought of the home of her 19, 1735. (Old Style). He would become to its present size In 1716, as evidenced 
by the Billings brothers, complete with a uncle, the noted Dr. Zabiel Boylston of the second president of the United States, by a date brick found in the new fireplace, 
farmhouse similar to his own. Brookline, whose furniture came all the Deacon John purchased purchased the According to Henry Adams, grandson 

Susanna Adams was a Boylston of way from London. house next door for 500 pounds in 1744 of President John Quincy Adams, no 

Brookline, socially a cut above her hus- Their first child, a son who was named and it was ready 20 years later when member of the family lived in the cottages 
band, and perhaps there were moments John for his father, was born in the south- young John moved in with his brand new after 1818, although ownership remained 

bride, the former Abagail Smith, the >n the Adams family until 1940. 

preacher's sparkling daughter from the Both houses were restored by the 

next town of Weymouth. Adams Realty Trust, the John Quincy 

Their second child, a son who was Adams Birthplace in 1896 at a cost of 

named John Quincy Adams after his $1,650 and the John Adams Birthplace 

great-grandfather. Col. John Quincy, was a year later at an expense of $515.49. 

born there on July 11, 1767. He would They were presented to the city of 

become the sixth president of the United Quincy in 1940 and supervised by the 

States. Quincy Historical Society until they were 

The junction of Franklin St., Indepen- turned over to the U.S. National Park 

dence Ave., and President Ave. in South Service in 1979. 

Quincy is the only place in the country 

where the birthplaces of two presidents 

stand side by side in the same city. 
The precise age of the two cottages at 

the foot of Penn's Hill is not known. 
When the John Adams Birthplace was 

retorted by the Daughters of Revolution 

in 1897, a brick bearing the date 1861 

was discovered under the southeast cor- 
ner, and the house was known to have 

been occupied by one Joseph Penniman 

in that year. 

And a man named Samuel Belcher was 

living in the John Quincy Adams as early 

as 1663, when it was little more than a 



7^^q«^^^wn7«n«w**f***fv 




Watercolor Available 




tone ^umcu 

is an original watercolor lithograph depicting 

historical sites in Quincy by artist Bill Beyer. 

A limited number of signed and numbered prints 

are available from the Quincy Hospital 

Health & Education Foundation 

for $35 unframed and $125 framed. 

Proceeds from the sale of historic Quincy prints 

will help to enhance healthcare services at Quincy Hospital. 

For more information or to order your print, 

please call the Quincy Hospital 

Health & Education Foundation at 



The Adams Birthplaces at 133 
and 141 Franklin St. are open daily, 
including Sundays and holidays, 
ftrom 9 a.ni. to 5 p.m. from ^ril 19 
to Nov. 10 with guided tours. Ad- 
mission is $2 for adults and children 
over 16, which also includes admis- 
sion to the Adams Mansion within 
seven days. Paii( passes are avail- 
able. Tours must be arranged at the 
Visitors' Center, 1250 Hancock St. 
Last full tour leaves Visitors' Cen- 
ter at 3:15 p.m. Tours are on a first 
come, first serve basis. 



(617) 376-5495. 



§^iS 



The Presidential Trail 

The Adams Birthplaces are an impor- Adams Crypt, City Hall, Hancock Cem- 

tant stop on the newly designated Quincy etery, the Adams Birthplaces, Abigail 

Presidential Trail, a 10.5 mile route that Adams Cairn, First Commercial Railroad, 

takes the visitor through the 17th and First Ironworks, Cd. Josiah Quincy House 

18th Century locales associated with the and Moswetuset Hummock, most of 

lives of the Adams family. which are described in this supplement. 

The Quincy Presidential Trail is a Na- 

Historic sites along the trail include the tional Recreatfon Trail, the seventh in the 

Adams Mansion, Quincy Homestead, state of Massachusetts and the 625th in 

Adams Academy, First Parish Church, the nation. 



Thursday, July 1,1999 TIm Quincfsr Sua Pa«c5A 



The Quincy City Council 

Proudly Serving Historic Quincy 

Today and Tomorrow 



DANIEL RAYMONDI 

Ward 2 Councillor 



STEPHEN DURION 

Ward 5 CourKillor 



J^ 



PATRICK McDERMOTT 

Ward 3 Councillor 



BRUCE AYERS 

Ward 6 Councillor 



MICHAEL D'AMICO 

Ward 4 Councillor 



sJ^^^ 



<1^I1IIZS» ' 



CITY OF 
PRESIDENTS 



HISTORIC QUINCY 

As the City of Quincy comes to the end of this 
century, it is one of the most historic and signifi- 
ceuit places to live in Massachusetts and, indeed, 
in the United States. We loolt bacl< with reverence 
at a century of unparalleled achievement - grateful 
to our forefathers - for their vision, their foresight 
and their success. 

Our forefathers and the residents of the City of 
Quincy, went forward on this historical spot to 
change their community, their country and in 
some cases, even the world. From the founding of 
the settlement in 1625 to present day, Quincy has 
.strived to maintain a high quality of life. Citizens 
arc, indeed, proud of the high caliber of this 
municipality with a superior school system and 
public service on all levels being responsible to the 
needs of the people. It is no wonder why people 
love to call this vibrant City of Quincy their home. 
We value our rich heritage and all the magnificent 
natural resources that exist. 

On behalf of all the members of the Quincy City 
Council and myself, having served the last four 
years as Council President, we look back with 
great pride and we look ahead with great enthusi- 
asm to the next century. 



T^Z)^ (/ A<t^u^ 



PETER KOLSON 

Council President 
Ward 1 Councillor 



1999 



TIMOTHY CAHILL 

Councillor At-Large 



PAUL HAROLD 

Councillor At-Large 



FRANCIS McCAULEY 

Councillor At-Large 



JOSEPH SHEA 

Clt]f Clerk 



MAUREEN HALLSEN 

Assistant City CleHt 



JOANNE MARINOPOULOS 

Administrative Assistant 
to Qty Coundl 



JEANNE REARDON 

Cleric of Committees 



RICHARD MEADE 

Planning Director 



ROBERT E.FOY. 

City Auditor 



y 



i 



Page 6A Tlia Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 




THE ADAMS MANSION 



'The Old House' 

Summer White House And Home Of 2 Presidents 



Josiah Quincy, the one who built 
railroads around New England 
and founded the cooperative bank 
movement in Massachusetts, was 
in his Ixjyfiood a frequent visitor lu the 
mansion where John Adams, the second 
president of the United States, lived in re- 
tirement. 

Later, he wrote with wry amusement 
about Sunday dinner with the aging pa- 
triarch of the Adams clan and his wife, 
Abigail, a dinner that inevitably began with 
a thick pudding made from boiled corn 
meal. 

"...it being thought desirable to take 
the edge off one's hunger before reach- 
ing the joint, " wrote Quincy. 

"Indeed, it was considered wise to 
stimulate the young to fill themselves with 
pudding, by the assurance that the boy 
who managed to eat the most of it should 
be helped most abundantly to the meat, 
which was to follow. 

"It need not be said that neither the 
winner nor his competitors found much 
room for meat at the close of their con- 
ttist; and so the domestic economy of the 
arrangement was very apparent." 

Quincy, as a young Harvard law stu- 
dent, stopped by several times a week in 
summer to talk and read to the former 
President. He found the visits delightful. 
Indeed, the Adams of the cold and aus- 
tere public mien was never more relaxed 
than he was at his country home in 
Quincy. 

The original house, a small part of the 
present building, was built probably in 
1731 by Major Leonard Vassall, a wealthy 
West Indian sugar planter who lived in 
Cambridge and apparently used it for a 
summer place. 

His daughter, Mrs. Anna Borland, who 
was a Loyalist during the Revolution, 
abandoned the house to leave with the 



British forces when they evacuated Bos- 
ton in 1776. For a while it was used as a 
haven for rebel refugees fleeing the war 
zones. 

Mrs. Borland returned to reclaim the 
house after the Revolution and John 
Adams, then in Europse as the first Ameri- 
can ambassador to London, purchased it 
for 600 FKDunds through the good offices 
of the Cotton Tuffs of Weymouth, his wife 
Abigail's cousin. 

The Adamses were about to return to 
the United States after seven years abroad 
and Abigail was concerned that John's 
books and papers and the furnishings they 
had acquired in Europe would not fit into 
their old farmhouse at the foot of Penn's 
Hill where they lived before. 

The deal was closed on Sept. 26, 
1787, and the deed is still on file in the 
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in which 
the Adams purchase is specified as a 
house, barn and other buildings on seven 
acres of land with some 76 acres more 
scattered around the North Precinct of 
Braintree. 

There are indications that Abigail was 
first disappointed with her purchase. It was 
a lot smaller than she remembered it. 

"In height and breadth it feels like a 
wren's house, ' she wrote to her daugh- 
ter, Abigail, the wife of Col. William S. 
Smith, "Let Col. Smith come without 
heels to his shoes or he will not be able to 
walk upright." 

Abigail and John Adams moved into 
the house, which they named 
"Peacefield," after his retirement from the 
presidency in 1801 and lived there until 
they died. 

It was from the "Old House," as the 
family called it, that John Adams carried 
on his long and increasingly warm corre- 
spondence with his old rival, Thomas 
Jefferson of Virginia, who had succeeded 



him in the presidency. In retirement, they 
became firm friends as they outlasted their 
contemporaries. 

"Thomas Jefferson lives," whispered 
John Adams as he lay dying in the Old 
House. He was wrong. Jefferson, in far 
away Monticello, Va., had preceded him 
in death by a few hours on the same day. 

It was July 4, 1826, the 50th anniver- 



sary of the Declaration of Independence. 
The Old House which served as sum- 
mer White House for two presidents, was 
home to four generations of the Adams 
family, the last, Brooks Adams, dying in 
February, 1927. It was taken over by the 
U.S. National Park Service in 1946 to 
become the Adams Mansion National 
Historic Site. 



The site at 135 Adams St. is open from April 19 to Nov. 10 daily 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $2 for adults and children over 
16, and includes admission to the Adams Birthplaces within seven 
days. Tours must be arranged at the Visitors Center, 1250 Hancock 
St. Tours are on a first come, first serve basis. 



The Adams Family 



1. HENRY ADAMS (1583-1646) 
emigrated from England in 1638 and 
was granted 40 acres in Mount 
Wollaston (later Quincy). 

2. JOSEPH ADAMS (1626-1694), 
son of Henry, farmer and maltster of 
Old Braintree. 

3. JOSEPH ADAMS (1654-1737), 
son of Joseph, who married Hannah 
Bass, a granddaughter of John Alden 
and Priscilla Mullins. 

4. JOHN ADAMS (1691-1761), 
son of Joseph, farmer and selectman 
of Old Braintree, known as Deacon 
John. 

5. JOHN ADAMS (1735-1826), 
son of Deacon John and second Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

5a. SAMUEL ADAMS (1722- 
1803), revolutionary firebrand; great- 
great-grandson of Henry and cousin of 
President John. 

6. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS (1767- 
1848), son of John, sixth President of 
the United States. 



7. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS 
(1807-1886), son of John Quincy, 
minister to Great Britain during the 
Civil War. 

. 8. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS II 
(1833-1894), son of Charles Francis, 
state legislator and thrice candidate for 
governor of Massachusetts. 

8a. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS 
II (1835-1915), son of Charles Francis, 
historian and founder of the Quincy 
school system. 

8b. HENRY ADAMS (1838-1918), 
son of Charies Francis, author of "The 
Education of Henry Adams." 

8c. BROOKS ADAMS (1848- 
1927), son of Charies Francis, the last 
Adams to live in the Old House in 
Quincy. 

9. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS III 
(1866-1954), son of John Quincy II, 
mayor of Quincy and Secretary of the 
Navy under President Hoover. 

10. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS 
IV ( 1 9 1 0- 1 999), chairman of the board 
of Raytheon Co. 



w^rm^mtmm^^T- 



Thunday,Jiily 1,1999 TIm Quinoy Sua Pagc7A 



QUINGY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



A Proud Heritage 

The proud heritage of the Quincy Public Schools, established under 
the leadership of its first Superintendent, Colonel Francis W. Parker, 
continues to the present day. 

And, we are proud and pleased to honor John Adams, John Quincy 
Adams, John Hancock and the other patriots whose values and 
determination helped shape our great nation. 

We are committed to maintaining and providing an educational 
system that is responsive to all of its people by developing skills to 
become contributing citizens, self-fulfilling individuals and competent 
workers. 



EIJGENE CREEDON 

Superintendent of Schools 
Secretar\f to School Committee 



JAMES A. SHEETS 

Ma^r 
School Committee Chairman 



LINDA STICE 

Vice Chairman 



SEAN BARRY 



JOANN BRAGG 



CHRISTINE CEDRONE RONALD MARL\NO MICHAEL McFARIj<VND 



1999 



1 



PageSA Tl&« Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 




THE FIRST PARISH CHURCH 



TOMBS OF PRESIDENTS John and John Quincy Adams and their 
wives in First Parish Church. 



United First Parish Church, 'Church Of The Presidents' 

Where 2 Presidents, Their Wives Are Entombed 



In 1949, when the present First Par 
ish Church building, the Old Stone 
Temple, was 121 years old, it was 
ruled officially that the church is older 
than the city itself and the town before it. 
It was then that the late historian Will- 
iam Churchill Edwards was called upon 
to resolve a minor dispute that involved 
the rounding of the corners of the church 
lot in downtown Quincy. 

"Almost the first subject tO which the 
minds of the early settlers of our country 



were turned after they landed here was 
the formation of a church," said Edwards. 

The first church in these parts was es- 
tablished as a branch of the Church of 
Boston in 1636. It became a church in its 
own right in 1639. The Mount Wollaston 
section of Boston was incorporated as the 
town of Braintree on May 23, 1640. 
Ergo, the church came first! 

Quincy's first house of worship, the 
branch of the Church of Boston, was 
called the "Chapel of Ease," and if it was 




Welcome to Quincy 
and the South Shore 



REALTOR® 

A Nice Place to LivCy Work & Play 

Quality Housing 

Excellent Job Opportunities 

Quality Schools 

Superior Recreation 

Seashore ... Parks ... Clubs 

Modern Shopping Facilities 

Excellent Transportation Network 

South Shore Association of Realtors® 
and Multiple Listing Service 

197 Quincy Ave., Suite 101, Braintree 02184 

For information or help call 
(781) 849-6700, Fax (781) 849-0133 

e-mail ssarcoeo@aol.com 
Visit our public site of homes ^^^ 



neglected by early historians it was be- 
cause its first pastor, the Rev. John Wheel- 
wright, his sister-in-law, Anne Hutchinson, 
and others were banished from the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Colony for heresy. 

The new church, the one that lasted, 
was gathered by covenant on Sept. 26, 
1639, and it was holding services in its 
third meeting house in 1732 when its 
pastor was the Rev. John Hancock, fa- 
ther of the bold first signer of the Decla- 
ration of Independence. Son John also 
was a member. 

The affairs of the church and the town 
of Quincy were one and the same until 
1824 when church and state were sepa- 
rated in Massachusetts and the Congre- 
gational Society was established to handle 
parochial matters. 

The old Hancock meeting house was 
still standing, although a little run down, 
on the south lawn of the present church 
lot in 1822 when former President John 
Adams deeded the interest from certain 
of his lands and granite from his pastures 
to build a stone temple. 

It was completed in Greek revival style 



at a cost of $30,488. 56-which was some 
$3,000 less than architect Alexander 
Parrish's estimate-and dedicated Nov. 12, 
1828, with John Quincy Adams, the sixth 
President of the United States holding 
Pew No. 1. 

Even before the church was dedicated, 
the mortal remains of his benefactors, 
John and Abigail Adams, were transferred 
to tombs in the crypt of the church and, 
in 1852, the bodies of John Quincy 
Adams and his wife, Louisa, joined them. 

It is the only church in the United States 
in which two Presidents are buried. The 
only other church in which a President is 
buried is the Episcopal Cathedral in Wash- 
ington, D.C., where President Woodrow 
Wilson is entombed. 



An active Unitarian Universal- 
ist Church, it is open to the pub- 
lic for tours daily from 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. 
mid-June through mid-Septem- 
ber. Admission is $2; under 16 
admitted free. For further infor- 
mation, call 617-773-0062 or the 
church office at 617-773-1290. 



ol 



mgm 



for sale at realtorhomes.com 



•••••TK 



Why We Pronounce 
It 'Quin-zee' 



Why do we pronounce Quincy 
"Quin-zee" when just about everyone 
else in the country refers to it as "Quin- 
see?" 

There are 16 other Quincys in the 
U.S., but they pronounce It "Quin-see." 

Can they be right and we be wrong? 

Not according to Quincy's late city 
historian, William C. Edwards who 
never budged an inch whenever the 
argument ever came up. And it still 
comes up. 

The reason we pronounce it "Quin- 
zee" is very simple. 

"That's the way the Quincy family 
pronounced it," he used to explain. 

"The original Quincy family which 



settled here at Mount Wollaston pro- 
nounced it 'Quin-zee,' including Col. 
John Quincy after whom Quincy, 
Mass. — the first Quincy — was named in 
1792." 

Colonel Quincy was the great grand- 
father of sixth President John Quincy 
Adams. 

Apparently, all 16 other Quincys in 
the U.S. were named after John Quincy 
Adams. 

And, apparently the early settlers of 
those communities thought John 
Quincy prorxxinced it John "Quin-see." 

Anyway, that is how Edwards ex- 
plained it. 

Seems like a sound argument. 



Quincy Was 
Almost Hancock 



Thursday, July 1, 1999 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Pa^ 9A 




If some of the early settlers had their 
way, you would be living in the city 
of Hancock today instead of the city 
of Quincy. 

Quincy, like George Washington, was 
born on Feb, 22. 

On Feb. 22, 1792, the General Court 
of Massachusetts passed an act incorpo- 
rating the North Precinct of Old Braintree 
as the separate town of Quincy. 

But, just before that, quite a few of the 
residents wanted the new town named 
after native-son John Hancock instead of 
Boston-born Colonel John Quincy. 

Colonel Quincy, who had represented 
Old Braintree in the General Court, was 
the great-grandfather of President John 
Quincy Adams. 

Many people today think Quincy was 
named after the sixth President but the 
honor actually goes to his great-grandfa- 
ther. 

John Hancock, who was born in the 
North Precinct, was governor of Massa- 
chusetts when the General Court passed 
the act incorporating the new town as 
Quincy. He signed the act the following 
day. 

But at the first town meeting of the new 
town in May, a petition was presented to 
change the name from Quincy to 
Hancock in honor of the patriot and first 
signer of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. The move was finally defeated af- 
ter a stormy verbal battle. 

Opponents argued that Hancock was 




JOHN HANCOCK 

still alive and that the honor shouW go to 
a distinguished-but-deceased-person. 

Colonel Quincy met those require- 
ments. He was both distinguished and de- 
ceased. 

He had represented Old Braintree in 
the General Court from 1717 to 1741, 
12 of those years as Speaker of the 
House. He died in 1767 at age 77, two 
days after John Quincy Adams was born. 

Quincy became a city June 11, 1888. 

But a lot of people will go right on think- 
ing Quincy was named after John Quincy 
Adams. 



Spring Cleaning jn Quincy, circoi92o 

In 1918 the Fentecostal Collegiate 
Institute of North Scituate, Rhode 
Island became EASTERN 
NAZARENE COLLEGE and moved 
to the beautiful \(bllaston campus 
of the former Quincy Mansion 
School for Girls. Each spring 
classes were dismissed for 
'"Campus Day" when students 
and faculty worked together to 
spring dean the parklike 
campus that had become home 
to ENC. Ibday the campus is 
graced by over 75 varieties of 
trees and plants, some 
original to the Josiah Quincy 
estate and some rarely found 
elsewhere in the U.S. 

Eastern Nazarene College is a four-year, liberal arts, Christian college, 

offering more than 50 traditional undergraduate progranns, 

a degree completion program for adults (LEAD), and 1 3 graduate programs. 

EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

23 East Elm Ave. • Quincy, MA 02170 • 617-745-3000 
Proudly serving Quincy & Ae Soutb Shore for 78 years. 





WELCOME TO HISTORIC QUINCY 

I 

The City of Presidents 

Be Sure To Visit: 

Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces, 

Adams Academy/Quincy Historical Society, Adams Mansion 

National Historic Site, Abigail Adams Cairn, First Parish Church, 

Thomas Crane Public Library, Hancock Cemetery, Moswetuset Hummock, 

United States Shipbuilding MuseumAJ.S.S. Salem and more. 

We're proud to be in the City of Quincy. 



BankBoston 



J 



Page lOA Thm Quinogr 8iu& Thursday, July 1, 1999 



Wife, Mother Of Two Presidents 

Abigail Adams: A Unique Distinction 



Abigail Adams has a unique place 
in history as the only woman to 
be the wife of one president and 
the mother of another. 

And, she nearly became the grand- 
mother of a vice president. 

Her husband, John, was the second 
president from 1797 to 1801 and her 
son, John Quincy, the sixth from 1825 
to 1829. 

A grandson, Charles Francis Adams, 
ran unsuccessfully for vice president on 
the Free Soil ticket in 1848. 

Sadly, Abigail did not live to see her 
son become president. She died in her 
74th year Oct. 28, 1818 seven years 
before. 

Although she is traditionally remem- 
bered as the wife of one president and 
the mother of another— an honor shared 
by no other woman — she was more than 
that. 

She was a remarkable woman on her 




ABIGAIL ADAMS 




What makes 
Quincy great? 

* Quincy s neighborhoods, Quincy people * 

'^ Quincy history, Quincy culture, ocean breezes * 

* Great kids and great teachers in great schools * 

* City employees who go above & beyond ... * 
and always with a smile 

* Miles of gorgeous shorehne, a great place to walk * 

^ An impressive variety of opinions, experiences and voices * 

* An impressive variety of businesses, right here in town, * 
committed to Quincy 

* All of Metro Boston, just a few minutes away * 

* And the Quincy Sun, which has served Quincy so faithfully * 
and chronicled her stories so well for over 30 years 




COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY: 1 5 Be»ch Sl, next to WolUiton Poit Office 617-471-0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle U. Waihington Sa„ next to Stop & Shc^ 781 -?31-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin Sl , next to Stop ti Shop 781 -767-1 776 ^^ 

Innind FDIC Uu 
55 



own and one ahead of her times. 

Born in neighboring Weymouth Nov. 
11, 1744, the daughter of Rev. William 
Smith, a Congregational minister and 
Elizabeth Quincy Adams, she had no for- 
mal schooling. 

But through tutoring by her father and 
mother and reading, she became a well- 
known writer of letters that have served 
to help chronicle American history. 

She was an early advocate of women's 
rights as attested in one of her famous 
letters to her husband who was often 
away. She wrote: 

"In the new code of bw which I sup- 
pose it will be necessary for you to make, 
I desire that you remember the ladies and 
be more generous and favorable to them 
than your ancestors. 

And, she strongly added: 

"Do not push such unlimited powers 
into the hands of the husbands. Remem- 
ber, all men would be tyrants if they 
could." 

She was a brave woman, too. She was 
often left alone for long periods of time 
to care for the chiWren and run the farm 
at the foot of Perm's Hill while her hus- 
band was away in the service of the fledg- 




ABIGAIL ADAMS and her son, John 
Quincy Adams-the hiture sixth Presi- 
dent-look out over Quincy Square 
from beside historic First Parish 
Church. The handsome bronze statue 
depicts her at about age 32 and him 
as a 10-year <rfd. h was commissioned 
by the Quincy Partnership and created 
by noted scu^tor Lloyd Little. 

{QixirKy Sun photc/Robert B<xworth) 



ling country. 

Early in their marriage, he was in 
France trying to ckvek)p strong ties with 
that country and she sailed to meet him 
in Paris. They had not seen one another 
in five years. 

John and Abigail Adams were the first 
president and first lady to occupy the 
White House. When Adams took office 
as the second president succeeding 
George Washington, March 4, 1797, 
Philadelphia was the natk>n's capital. John 
arxl Abigail moved into the White House 
in November, 1800. It was called the 
President's Palace at that time. 

No fancy airs about her. She won a 
special spot in White House folklore by 
hanging her laundry in the East Room. 
She was being practical. Many of the 
rooms had not been finished when they 
moved in and the East Room was one of 
the warmer and better ones for drying wet 
clothing. 

Adams and Thomas Jefferson were 
close friends and worked together to pro- 
duce the precious Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. But they had a falling out and be- 
came political enemies. 

Jefferson ran against Adams in his bid 
for re-election to a second term and de- 
feated him. Adams was so bitter he re- 
fused to stay in Washington for Jefferson's 
inaugural in 1801 and came home to 
Quincy. 

Abigail became a peacemaker through 
letters to Jefferson and thanks to her ef- 
forts the two former presidents reconciled 
in their later years. 

Both succumbed July 4, 1826, the 
50th anniversary of the Declaration of 
Independence, Jefferson a few hours be- 
fore Adams. 

Unlike Abigail, Adams lived to see his 
son, John Quincy Adams, elected sixth 
president in 1824. 

John and Abigail were married 54 
years and it was a happy union despite 
frequent and long separations in the early 
years. 

Abigail was the woman behind two 
men — a husband and son who encour- 
aged and helped them in their distin- 
guished service to their country on their 
way to the Presidency. 

She, her husband, her son and daugh- 
ter-in-law, Ijouisa Catherine are entombed 
in the crypt at United First Parish Church. 

A bronze statue of Abigail and John 
Quincy was erected last year just a few 
feet away. 

It was created 1:^ noted sculptor Lloyd 
Lillie and commissioned by the Quincy 
Partnership, a group of active commu- 
nity business leaders. 

The statue depicts Abigail at about age 
32 and John Quincy at age 10 with her 
hand on his shoulder in a motheriy touch. 

The very spot from which she now 
looks out onto Quincy Sq. is where she 
walked when the area was an open field. 



•mr 



Thursday, July 1, 1999 Tl&« Qulnoy Sua Page llA 



At Dorothy/ Quinci; Homestead 

John Hancock's Declaration Of Love 



An aura of romance surrounds 
the stately old house that is set 
back in the trees from the cor 
ner of Hancock St. and Butler 
Rd., on the banks of Furnace Brook. 

There is the wallpaper with its blue 
cupids and pink flowers that was imported 
from France for the wedding of Dorothy 
Quincy, the vivacious daughter of the 
house, to Quincy-born John Hancock, a 
patriot on the run with a price on his head. 
There are the words "You I Love and 
You alone," addressed by Hancock to his 
beloved Dorothy and scratched on a win- 
dow pane with his diamond ring just be- 
fore he fled to Lexington on the eve of 
the Revolution. 

And there are the secret chambers and 
passageways, used, it was said, to hide 
fugitive patriots during the Revolution and, 
at an earlier date, even certain English- 
men fleeing a charge of regicide in the 
death of King Charles I. 

Parts of the house were built in 1685 
by Col. Edmund Quincy, the second of 
the name, on land that was granted to an 
earlier Edmund in 1638. The major part 
was built in 1706 by Edmund the third. 
(There were six Edmunds in all, four in a 
direct line; two nephews.) 

The house was the socicil center of old 
Braintree during the regime of the fourth 
Edmund, largely because he sired five 



beautiful daughters around whom swirled 
a whole future generatk}n of judges, gen- 
erals arxJ merchant kings. 

The undisputed belle of the househoki 
was Dorothy, the coquettish youngest of 
the eight Quincy chikjren, whose troth 
was soon p)lighted to John Hancock, the 
wealthy young businessman from, Boston 
who was already becoming known as a 
leader of the rebels. 

Tradition has it that they were to have 
been married in the north parlor of the 
Quincy homestead with its French cupid 
wallpaper when Revolution intervened 
and John had to flee with the British on 
his heels. 

Eventually, they were wed Aug. 28, 
1775, at the home of Thaddeus Burr, 
uncle of Aaron Burr (later Vice President 
of the United States) in Fairfield, Conn. 

After the Revolution and the death of 
Edmund the fourth in 1788 the old house 
passed from the Quincy family. The 
Hancocks wanted nothing to do with it. 
Their only son, John George Washing- 
ton Hancock, was killed in a skating acci- 
dent at age 9 while on a visit in 1787. 

The house was acquired in 1904 by 
the Massachusetts Society of Colonial 
Dames, who restored it with vintage fur- 
niture, utensils and clothing, and gave it 
to the state with the proviso that the 
Dames continue to run it. 




DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



The Dorothy Quincy Homestead, 1010 Hancock St., is open to the 
public May tlurough October, Wednesday through Sunday, from noon 
to 5 p.m. (last tour at 4 p.m.) It is also open by appointment only 
Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon for groups. Admis- 
sion is $3.00 for adults and $1.00 for children age 16 and under. 



Quincy 2000 



The Quincy 2000 Corporation 

The Quincy 2000 Corporation is the City of Quincy's private, non-profit economic development 

agency dedicated to the improvement and vitality of the Quincy business community. 

Bring your business where it will be welcomed...come to Quincy. We Mean Business. 

• $5 million Loan Pool for Small Businesses 

• Grants for Commercial Facade Improvements 

• Investment Tax Credits 

• Job Creation Initiatives 

• Downtown Revitalization 

• Business Development Center 

For more information about our business development loan and grant programs, 

please visit our web site, call or write 

The Quincy 2000 Corporation 

1250 Hancock Street, Suite 802, Quincy MA 02169 

Phone: (617) 847-1454 Fax: (617) 471-3132 

wv^rw.quincy2000.org 



^ 



Page 12A Ti%m Quinoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



Thomas Crane Public Library 

A Romanesque 
Architectural Beauty 



He came to Quincy as a boy 
of 7, grew to young man 
hood on a farm in Quincy 
Point, learned the granite- 
cutters' trade, and left at the age of 26 to 
win fame and fortune in stone in New 
York City. 

That was the last Quincy saw of Tho- 
mas Crane for half a century until one 
February day in 1880, five years after his 
death, when his son, Albert, appeared 
with $20,000 with which to build a me- 
morial — preferably a library — to his 
father. 

"My father always retained a strong 
feeling for the town of Quincy," was his 
only explanation. 

Albert Crane himself chose the man 
to design the building, Henry Hobson 
Richardson, grandson of the English sci- 
entist Dr. Joseph Priestly and the fore- 
most architect of the day. 

His reputation was so formidable that 
he was able to tell Crane, "I cannot guar- 
antee that the building, when completed, 
shall conform to (your) ideas of beauty and 
taste," and still get the job. 

Richardson's Romanesque building, 
which now houses the reference section 
oi the library, was dedicated on May 30, 
1882, with the principal oration delivered 
by Charles Francis Adams, Jr., chairman 



of the Board of Trustees. 

It was Adams who gave the library its 
name. Albert Crane wanted it to be "The 
Quincy Free Public Library." Adams in- 
sisted on "The Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary." 

"Who's giving the building?" asked 
Albert Crane. 

"You are, but you wouldn't have if it 
hadn't been for me," said Adams, who 
was used to having his way around 
Quincy, and that was that. 

President John Adams' modest collec- 
tion of books was housed in the library 
until 1893, when it was discovered that 
in 1 1 years only two persons, one of them 
Charles Francis Adams, Jr., had asked to 
see them. They were then transferred to 
the Boston Public Library. 

At the start, Richardson's magnificent 
building was all but hidden behind a grain 
store, a hotel, an office buikJing and four 
homes that lined Washington St. 

Albert Crane, however, was a persis- 
tent man and, by the time he died in 
1917, he had purchased and torn down 
all the buildings, leaving a broad expanse 
of of)en space to enhance the library. 

But before the lawn could be seeded, 
World War I intervened and, in a burst of 
patriotism — "Food will win the war," they 
said — the area was planted with pota- 




THOMAS CRANE 

toes, tended by an expert brought in from 
Maine. The experiment failed. 

"There wasn't a potato in the lot tfiat 
was anyv^re near as large as a golf ball, " 
said Mayor Joseph L. Whiton. The har- 
vest was donated to the ]x>or farm. 



PUBUC LIBRARY 

Albert Crane also put up $64,000 to 
buikl the Spear St. wing of the library in 
1907-08 and the Crane family gave yet 
another $164,000 for the free standing 
addition, built in 1936, that now houses 
the stacks and the children's section. 



The Thomas Crane Public Li- and Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. 

brary, 40 Wasliington St., Is open to 5 p.m. h is closed on Saturdays 

to the public, free of duurge, Mon- during July and August, 
day to Thursday, a.m. to 9 p.m. 



Discover ... 

You may have discovered "The Big Apple," and "The 
Hub," it is time you discovered QUINCY. If you think it 
is just an historic city, are you in for a BIG SURPRISE. 
Do not let the historic ambiance and epic architecture 
fool you. These valuable and memorable treasures of 
bygone eras provide a unique backdrop for a wealth of 
exciting activity. 

Come visit and see for yourself. You will quickly notice, 
right here in the center of the city, unique shops, excit- 
ing restaurants, cafes and lively entertainment centers. 
Whether you are a lover of history, a shopper looking 
for a unique gift or special service, a hungry diner rel- 
ishing refreshment or perhaps seeking something ex- 
citing in entertainment, make Quincy Center your des- 
tination. 

Several times each year our main thoroughfare becomes a family playground, alive 

with the bustle of family entertainment. The third weekend in July features Summer 

Sidewalk Festival and again on third weekend in October witches and goblins invade 

to provide lively entertainment. Traditional parades and holiday activities fill the cen- 

ter during the festive winter season. ^■■■^K. (SI3IKJ u I 

Discover QUINCY, a great place to live, to work, and to visit. Do come and enjoy. 







^ SI'; 

nter 




umisv 



Thanday, July 1,1999 Tli«Quiii«y 



Pa|el3A 



The best way to visit the 
Northeast is with Best Western^ 




Historic Quincy, Downtown Boston, Cape Cod. 

All great places to visit . . . 

When you stay in our Best Western Hotel, you are 

guaranteed an even more exciting journey. 



Best Western Adams Inn 



• Free shuttle service to MBTA 
& Logan 

• Free Continental Breakfast 

• Free Cable TV 

• Pool & Outdoor lounge 

• Game Room 



All Major Credit Cards Accepted 

Meeting Rooms Available 

Over 100 newly renovated rooms 

Car Rentals 

Adjacent pet kennels 

Daily sight-seeing trolley 



29 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
617-328-1500 • 1-800-368-4012 

or visit our many locations in Boston & Cape Cod 



Pigel4A Thm Qv^ixuxj BUMX Thursday, July 1, 1999 




DOMED CEILING of the United First Parish church, cut with classic Greek 
lines, emphasizes the size and beauty of the church. The dome and the crypt 
of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and their wives combine 
to malte the "Church of Presidents" one of the ihost awe inspiring sights in 
Quincy. 




GENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR visited historic United Rrst Parish 
Church July 25, 1951 after his recaU by President Harry Truman. Shown 
on the steps of the church with him arc Mayor Thomas Burgin and Mrs. 
MacArthur. While stopphig by the Adams family pew hi the church, 
MacArthur said: "1 am certain that John Quincy Adams must have prayed 
In this pew for dhine guidance before he wrote the Monroe Doctrine." 

(Charles Flagg photo) 

Free Trolley Service 

A free trolley service is available from 141 Franklin St. and the "Old House", 

the Visitors Center, 1250 Hancock St., Adams Nattonal Historic Site, 135 Adams 

Quincy Sq., to the Presidents John and St., from 9:15 to 3:15 p.m. when the 

John Quincy Adams Birthplaces, 133 and last tour is conducted. 



Call About Our Move In Special 



'Z^ivER *Bay Club 

♦ 

...a retirement community that won't cramp your 
style, your furniture or your pocketbook. 



Who says moving to a retirement 
community means giving up 
space? At River Bay Club, you can 
select from a variety of spacious 
apartment plans. Every style is 
fully equipped with everything 
you need. There are no endow- 
ment fees, and the monthly rates 
are very affordable. 



Come see what you're missing at River Bay Club 
For more information or to schedule a personal tour please call: 

617-472-4457 

River Bay Club provides equal opportunities to all individuals 62 years of age or older. Q^^ 




□ Please send me information on River Bay Qub 

□ Please contact me to arrange a personal tour 



Name: _ 
Address: 
City: 



State: 



Phone: _ 
Zip Code: 



QS0699 



Mail to: River Bay Qub, 99 Brackett Street, Quincy, MA 02169 



^ 



• Savings, CDs 
and Money 

i/WW^/ M^^Kww -^^i^ Market Accounts 

/£flfmMfy ^^^Ijgi.^ -Consistently high 

iA/Jlw^ ^^^W^^^ interest rates to 

. ^^^^ maximize earnings 

• Free Checking With Interest - 

WOW! What could be better? 

•Full Investment Services -Through Infinex Financial 
Group 

• Business Loans- We'll help guide you through the 
process 

• Construction Loans - Can become mortgages 
automatically 

• Mortgages - Over 200 varieties... there's one that's right 
for you 

• Low-cost Home Equity Loans - for just about any purpose 

• Fixed-rate Master- Card and Visa - avoid rising Interest 
rates 



toeBANKof 



serving the south Shore 
ConmnmltY since 1855 

CANTON 275 Quincy Ave., Quincy 
r . ... .... 557 washingtoji St.,jCantO!i 



1^, ' 



Thursday, July 1,1999 T1&* Quinoy Sun Page ISA 




A MAIWETPIACE flourished on the grounds of Adams Academy in the early 1900s. 
The Academy, now the home of the Quincy Historical Society, was then headqual^ 
ters for the Boy Scouts. 



T> t:^ t:^ ^ iSr PROFILE OF A CITY t> i:v i> ^ t> 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
The City Of Presidents 

1625-1999 
QUINCY-YESTERDAY 



1614: Explored by Captain John Smith 

1621: Visited by Captain Myles Standish 

1625: Settled l^ Captain WoUaston 

1640: Mt. WoUaston incorporated as the Town of Braintree 

1735: Birth of John Adams 

1737: Birth of John Hancock 

1767: Birth of John Quincy Adams 

1779: John Adams drafts the Constitution of Massachusetts in Quincy 

1792: The North Precinct of Old Braintree and part of I>Drchester become 

the Town of Quincy 
1888: Chartered as the City of Quincy 

•QUINCY-TODAY- 



Population: City Census 88,781 

Land Area: 16.77 square miles 

Shoreline: 26 miles 




'/ 



'is 






\ 






iVoff ^ Quincy . . 

Your Pathway To 

"The City of Presidents" 

and 

Your Pathway To a 
Great Shopping Area. 

60 Businesses To Service 
All Your Needs! 



ABIGAILS CROSSING 

Your First Stopfer Quality Quinqf Souvenirs Gifts & Accessories 



THE CATS MEOW VILLAGE™ 






JOHN & JOHN 

QUINCY ADAMS 

BIRTHPLACES 



ABIGAIL ADAMS 
STATUE 



UNITED HRST PARISH 






BEANTOWN TROLL£Y ®^ HOUSE 

Other Quincy, Milton & Braintree custom collectibles available 

We also feature: Quincy & Area Hometown Pottery, 

Prints, Jewelry, Neckties, Scarfs, Ornaments, 

Books, T-Shirts & More! 

Boyd's Bears • Byers' Carolers • Cat's Meow • Dreamsicles 

• Harmony Kingdom • Possible Dreams Santas 

• Vera Bradley • Lang - Cards, Calendars, Candles 

• Lighthouses • Tapes & CDs 

1350 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 • 617-472-5667 

please visit our website often! wiuwAbigailsCrossingGifts.com 



gtg^'^iw'^"? 



/\ C\)mniilnicnl 

l() Business Isn't 

fusl Our Promise, 

It's Our I Iist()r\'. 



At Fleet, we've been making our financial resources available to businesses 
in comm unities throughout the Northeast for over 200 years. Call Kathleen 
A. Fitzgerald, Senior Vice President, at (617) 346-0300 to find out how our 
leadership can lead to something good for you. 



Meinber FDIC. Fleet B a Rgbtnvd mufc of fleet Fiiumdal Group, Inc 



JHFIeet 



Page 16A T1&* Qulnoy 8iu& Thursday, July 1, 1999 

Adams Academy 

On Site Of 

John Hancock's 

Birthplace 



By modern standards, the board 
ing house at the corner of 
Hancock and Depot Sts. had all 
the aspects of a genteel prison. 

Residents were forbidden to leave be- 
tween 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. They could not 
enter or leave at any time exept by the 
hall door. They were banned from pool 
halls and bars. Smoking materials also 
were forbidden to them. 

In exchange for good behavior, plus tu- 
ition ranging from $75 to $150 a year, 
they were given the best prep school edu- 
cation of the day, for they were students 
at Adams Academy, which flourished 
from 1872 to 1907 in Quincy. 

The academy was a gift of John 
Adams, the second President of the 
United States, who always had his check- 
book ready to fill the spiritual and educa- 
tional needs of the citizens of his beloved 
Quincy. 

The trust fund, nourished by "rents, 
profits and emoluments" from certain 
Adams-owned properties, was set up in 
the Adams will of 1822, but it was not 
until 1869 that the fund was deemed 
larege enough to start construction. 

The location was specified by Adams 



himself as the corner of Adams and 
Hancock Sts., site of the birhthplace of 
his childhood friend, John Hancock, the 
first signer of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. 

The doors opened to the first students, 
24 of them, on Sept. 4, 1872. Five years 
later, the academy reached a peak enroll- 
ment of 154 with an international student 
body— 25 from Quincy, four from Wash- 
ington, D.C., 125 from 14 states, two 
from England and one from Chile. 

It had one of the earliest prep school 
football teams, too, recording a tie with 
the Resolutes of Boston on Oct. 21, 
1876, a scant seven years after Princeton 
and Rutgers played the first college game. 
It whipped Andover three times from 
1877-79. 

The admissions catalogue specified that 
applicants be "well prepared in the usual 
studies of good grammar school" and 
warned that "no pupils are desired to give 
them a collegiate education." 

The best known headmaster was Dr. 
William Everett, once acclaimed as one 
of the seven smartest men in the world. 
He ran the academy with a firm hand from 
1878 to 1893 and again from 1897 to 




ADAMS ACADEMY, now home of the Quincy Historical Society. 



1907. From 1893 to 1897, he was a U.S. 
congressman from Lynn. 

Dr. Everett, an amiable if sometimes 
waspish eccentric, was widely known as 
the man who hated Abraham Lincoln. He 
had reason. His father was Edward 
Everett, whose masterful oration at 
Gettysburg was over-shadowed by 
Lincoln's notes scribbled on the back of 
an envelope. 



It was Dr. Everett, who signaled the 
passing of Adams Academy — and many 
other 19th Century classical prep 
schools — at graduation exercises in 1907 
when he said that "unless someone comes 
forward and planks down $50,000, the 
academy will be closed." 

Nobody did and on June 22, 1907, 
the Adams Academy officially closed its 
doors. 



The building today is occupied by the Quincy Historical Society, 
which maintains a museum and research library in the old class- 
rooms as well as an expanded gift shop.The museum and gift shop 
are open all year, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For 
Saturday hours, call 617-773-1144. Library hours are 9 a.m. to 
noon Monday and Wednesday; 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday and 1 to 4 p.m. 
the first Saturday of the month. Closed Sundays and holidays. There 
is a $1 fee for non-members; children age 12 and under are free. 



THE BUICK STORE 




'^ •aUi' THE RJTQT Km 



S LOW COS 






^,(4*- 






Mom^^^ 



ofSott^^ 



Sbore 



„.cWs.«*-'" 







This I- 




mark the 



1999 - C€HE SEE SCIJTIi S^CI^E ElJICr TCDAri 

We are ejrrertiy ceiebratirg ojr 96tli year as tfie 

eldest Cjich Deaiersliii) ir tiie cejrtry ard ^aye a 

repjtatier for jrsjrpassed cjstemer seryice ard satisfactier. 



mmm 



uiiioa^ 





SOUTH SHORE BUICK 

50 ADAMS ST., QUINCY 61 7-770-3300 www.s$buick 



.com 



tM 



SALES HOURS: MON-THURS 8-8, FRI 8-6, SAT 9-5, SUN 12-4 SERVICE & PARTS: MON, WED, FRI 8-6, TUES, THURS 8-8 



5r 



Thursday, July 1, 1999 Tb* Qulncy 8tu& Page 17A 



Abigail Adams Cairn 

The Smoke Could Be 
Seen Over Bunker Hill 



Abigail Adams was awakened at dawn 
in the farmhouse at the foot of Penn's 
Hill by the sound of far-off guns. All 
through the sweltering morning of June 
17, 1775, as she hustled about with the 
chores, the dull boom of cannon intruded 
on her consciousness. 

Riders on the Coast Road to Plymouth, 
stopping at the farmhouse for a drink of 
water, told her of a great battle underway 
on Breed's Hill in Charlestown. 

One of them brought word that Dr. Jo- 
seph Warren had been killed in the fight- 
ing and little Abby, age 10, burst into 
tears, and John Quincy, nearly 8, felt be- 
wildered and sad, for Dr. Warren was the 
Adams family doctor in Boston. 

In the afternoon, Abigail could stand it 
no longer. Taking Abby and John Quincy 
by the hand, she walked up the Coast 
Road to the top of Penn's Hill and climbed 
up on the rocks for a better view. 

The panorama of the Bay, a shimmer- 
ing blue in the sunshine, spread out be- 
fore them, the tiny houses on the three 
hills of Boston and, beyond, the black 
smoke rising in billows. 

"Good God," exclaimed Abigail, "they 
are burning Charlestown!" 

The scene etched itself forever in John 
Quincy's memory. 



The early days of the Revolution uere 
times of turmoil in Old Braintree and its 
North Precinct, which was later called 
Quincy. 

Abigail's husband, John, was -away 
most of the time at the Continental Con- 
gress in Philadelphia, leaving 31 -year-old 
Abigail to manage the farm and look to 
the needs of four small children: Abigail, 
John Quincy, Charles, 5, and Thomas 
Boylston, 3. 

There were days of alarm as the Brit- 
ish, penned up in Boston by the brand 
new Continental Army, foraged up and 
down the coast for supplies. Refugees 
from occupied Boston and the inner 
towns of Dorchester and Roxbury some- 
times slept in the kitchen and in the fields. 

As the wife of a member of Congress, 
Abigail was a center of attention. The 
house on the Coast Road was a favorite 
stopping place for travelers to Plymouth. 
Politicians up from Philadelphia made it 
a point to stop by for a visit with John 
Adams' wife. 

Abigail was invited to visit Gen. George 
Washington's headquarters at Winter Hill. 
The aristocratic Washington was suspect 
among New Englanders. He was a Vir- 
ginian; he was an Anglican; and, it was 
said, he held slaves. But John Adams liked 




ABIGAIL ADAMS CAIRN 

him and Abigail was soon charmed. something indefinable passed between 

One day, young John Quincy came them, 
home to find his Uncle Elihu melting down "Do you wonder, " wrote the sixth Presi- 

Abigail's pewter spoons in the kitchen to dent of the United States some 68 years 

make bullet molds. He looked at his later, "that a boy of 7 who witnessed this 

niother and she looked back at him and scene should be a patriot." 



In 1896, where the old Coast Road (now Franklin St.) meets Viden 
Rd. atop Penn's Hill, a stone cairn was built to mark the spot where 
Abigail and young John Quincy watched the Battle of Bunker Hill. It is 
open to the public and free of charge. 



Every Year, Nearly 100,000 Visitors 
Discover the History and Elegance of Quincy 

That's because Quincy is always worth the visit. 

From the treasures of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams' birthplaces 

to the Shipbuilding Museum and the Dorothy Quincy Homestead, 

Quincy is a destination worth discovering over and over again 

Citizens Bank salutes the people of Quincy, its leaders and everyone 
who helps preserve the heritage and tradition of The City of Presidents. 

c 

We're proud to support historic Quincy, as part of our 
commitment to the communities we serve. 



£ Citizens Bank 



Not Your Typical Bank. 



Pace 18A TIm Quinosr Sun Thunday, July 1, 1999 



FROM BRAINTREE 



@ 



/ 

HIGHLIGHTS 



1 . Town Hail: City Hall of Quincy Architect and 
builder, Solomon Willard. Completed November 
1. 1844. Built of Quincy granite. 

2. Adam* Academy ■ Site of the birthplace of John 
Hancock, the Patriot. Erected in 1871. Now the 
home of The Quincy Historical Society. World 
War I statue and menrtorial. Bust of Hancock. 
Historical exhibit. 

3 . Adams National Historic Site Built in 173 1 by 
Major Leonard Vassal. Purchased by President 
John Adams in 1787. and occupied by four 
generations of the Adams Family. 

4. Quincy Homestead Dating from 

1685, it was the home of four generatk>ns of the 
Edmund Quincy family. Home of Dorothy Quincy 
who married John Hancock. 

» ' 

5. Woodward School Founded by Dr. Ebcnezer 
Woodward in 1869 to educate Quincyborn girls. 

5, Milestone Marker - The Neponset Turnpike 
(now Hancock Street) gave people a shorter 
route to Boston. This milestone (almost illegal) 
marks l^ti miles from Boston. An older milstone 
across the way, on Adams Academy grounds, 
marks the miles on the old route via Milton. 

7. Quincy College - Formerly the Coddington 
School built in 1909. then a "modern" 
elementary school. 

8. Bethany Church • Built in 1928 in Gothic style, 
its gargoyles, four feet long, are the longest in 
New England. 

9. Thomas Crane Public Library Designed by 
Henry Jobson Richardson, foremost architect of 
his era. Commissioned in 1880 by Albert Crane in 
memory of his father. 

10. United First Parish Church A fine example of 
the Greek Revival period designed by Alexander 
Parrish and constructed in 1828. John Adams and 
his wife, Abigail, and John Quincy Adams and his 
wife Louisa Catherine are buried in the church. 

11. Hancock Cemetery ■ Dated around 1640 and 
named for the Reverend John Hancock, father of 
the Patriot. The oldest headstone is dated 1666. 

12. Post Office. 

13. Christ Church Oldest Episcopal parish in the 
state. 

14. St. John the Baptist Church - Roman Catholic. 
13. Christ Church Cemetery. 

16. Birthplaces of John Adams and John Quincy 

Adams The nation's only father and son 
presidents. The two saltbox farmhouses, 
undergoing restoration by the National Park 
Service are a brief walk down Franklin Street. 



SATURN 



The Quincy Center \^ 
het Us Show You Th 



\ 



^^A 



P 



/? 



B 



^RGi]^ 



^^ 



PARKWAY 



4r^ 



EXTENSION 



*?•, 



■^^^ 



^'. 



f^ 



15 



14 



>^ 



co 



c^ 



.^^^""^ 



Qfi 



^t^c' 



^0i 



c$> 



^ 



TW 



Saturn < 

A Different Kind o/ Company. A DiFFEREf 
Furnace Brook Parkway, Quincy, IVI 

Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; FrI. & Sat. 9-6; Sun. Noon-5 (6 1 7) 32 



7*^ 



+ 



SOUTHEST EXPRESSWAY 



Thursday, July 1, 1999 Tl&« Quinoy Sua Pafe 19A 



FROM BOSTON 



SOUTHEST EXPRESSWAY 



EXITS 



talking Tour 
e VJay . . . 



MILLER ST. 



^tP. 



,«?. 



;^«^ 



\K 






V'. 



^. 



<JV 



3^3? 



G^t 






,.•■' 



^. 



o 



11 

finish 



start. 



ao 



•• 



^^ 






C1^. 



e^?l 



.4r 



c,t^ 



.^ 



^•^ 



.^A 



.^. 



^4i 



Ai^ 



03 






^ 



.^/ 



.O 



«9y 



09. 






<^. 



i^/ 



LEGEND 
r^ public parking 
W statues & markers 
>•• walking tour 



0?/ 



Dff Quincy 



^T Kind of Car. A Different Kind o/Retailer. 
lA 02169, Exit 8, Southeast Expressway 

10~ 1 000 Please visit our web site: www.saturnofquincy.com 



« 



SATURN 



TM 



Page 20A TH« Qulncy S\m Thursday, July 1, 1999 

Josiah Quinci; House 



Lookout For Spying On British Ships 



Abigail Adams stood with her 
great-uncle, Col. Josiah 
Quincy, in a window of his 
mansion overlooking 

Wollaston Beach and watched the tall 
masts of 170 ships stand slowly out to 
sea. It was March 17, 1776. The British 
were evacuating Boston. 

But even in triumph there was trag- 
edy. 

Aboard the departing ships were more 
than 1 ,000 Loyalists, Americans who had 
chosen King above country, and one of 
them was Abigail's cousin, Samuel 
Quincy, the Colonel's only remaining son, 
an avowed Tory. 

"1 take a long farewell," his sister, 
Hannah, wrote to him for one last time. 
"Let it not be published that a brother of 
such brothers fled from his country. Can 
you expect to walk uprightly now? Can 
you take fire in your bosom and not be 
burned?" 

Two of Col. Josiah Quincy 's sons had 
died young. Now he had no more. 

But theve was no time for regrets. The 
work of revolution had begun. The sec- 
ond floor of the house at what is now 20 
Muirhead St., Wollaston, was a lookout - 
from which the 66-year-old Colonel spied 
on British ship movements for his friend, 
Gen. George Washington. 

A few months before, Col. Quincy 
watched the Royal Governor, Gen. Tho- 
mas Gage depart and he scratched on a 



pane of window glass the reminder: "Oct. 
10, 1775, General Gage sailed for En- 
gland with a fair wind." 

This time he remained in the window 
for three days as the British tall ships 
moved restlessly about the Harbor as if 
reluctant to leave. Finally, on March 20, 
the last of them passed through the road- 
stead and out to sea. 

The mansion in Wollaston reached full 
social flower under the aegis of the 
Colonel's grandson, the third Josiah, the 
"Great Mayor" of Boston, president of 
Harvard and Congressman, who called it 
"Tranquillia" and used it as his summer 
home. 

It was there that the Marquis de 
Lafayette visited one Sunday afternoon 
after dinner with his friend, ex-President 
John Adams at the Adams Mansion. He 
carried flowers from the Adams garden 
for Mrs. Eliza Susan Quincy and her five 
attractive daughters. 

The house was built in 1770 by the 
old Colonel himself, the first in a line of 
six Josiahs. it was said that, while most 
families passed their line from sire to son, 
the Quincys went from 'Siah to 'Siah. 

But, while there were six Josephs and 
innumerable Edmunds, the city was 
named for yet another member of the 
prolific family — Col. John Quincy, the 
great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams, 
sixth president of the United States. 




JOSIAH QUINCY HOUSE 



The Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead St., Wollaston is open to the 
public from June 5 to Oct. 15, Saturdays and Sundays 11 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Tours are conducted on the hour and the last tour begins at 4 p.m. 
Visits may be made at other times by appointment. Admission is $2, 
children $1, and seniors $1.50; children 5 and younger free. All Quincy 
residents and SPNEA members are admitted free. 



How Many Miles From Boston? 



Stone mile markers across Hancock 
Street from each other indicate that the 
traveler is both 7 1/4 and 10 miles from 
Boston. And both are correct. 

The 10-mile marker was placed on the 
Old Coast Road, one of the oldest high- 
ways in the United States still in existence, 



which went from Boston to Plymouth in 
1639 by way of inland Milton. 

The 7 1/4-mile marker was raised af- 
ter the first bridge over the Neponset River 
was built in 1803, creating the Neponset 
Turnpike, which is today Hancock St. in 
North Quincy and Wollaston. 



V 



«i^ 



•4 






'■■-i> 
















Presidents Place m% 
always the ri^ht address 
PRESIDENTS for ^reat shopping in 

Always the right address dO^^ntOH^n IfUinCy • 

PRESIDENTS PLACE MERCHANTS INCLUDE: 

• B-Natural Day Spa & Salon • Buck A Book • CellularONE 

• Dubin Chiropractic * Dunkin' Donuts 

• GJ. Coddington's Restaurant • Harvard Vanguard Optical 
• Lazzarino's Gourmet Pizzeria • National Park Service 

• Olsten Staffing Services • Presidents Place Dental 

• Remedy Staffing Services • TAD Staffing Services 

• Tedeschi Food Shops • Treasure Chest • Weight Watchers 

I2SO Hancock Street^ 
Quincy Center^ Quincy n\ 

Free VaUdated Park^n^I 

Managed by 

^LlNOOlM 

Property 

COMPANY 

(617)773-8339 



Thursday, July 1,1999 Tli* Qulnosr Sua Pagc21A 



I 



\"^t REMAINS Or 



JOHN WINTHROP JR. 

BLAST F.URNACE 

AHES'CAS fIRSI 
PRODUCllVt IROHKORRS 

ERECTED *IN 1644 




First Iron Works 



Steel Industry Born 
Here In 1644 



It failed after nine years of effort and 
since failure was anathema in a grow 
ing America, perhaps that is why the 
site and even the memory of the first 
commercial iron blast furnace in the 
United States was lost for so long. 

It flourished, if that is the word , from 
1644 to 1653 on the banks of the Mount 
Wollaston River in a section of Old 
Braintree called, "the Woods." It left is 
name on the river, now Furnace Brook in 
West Quincy 

Iron was an important commodity in 
Colonial Massachusetts, particularly for 
nails and pots and pans. Unfortunately, 
iron utensils had to be imported from 
England, a costly process for the penny- 
wise colonists. 

With this in mind, John Winthrop Jr., 
son of the governor of the Massachusetts 
Bay colony (Did someone cry "Nepo- 
tism?"], went to London and formed the 
"Company of Undertakers for the Iron- 
works in New England." He, of course, 
was the local agent. 

The Company gave Winthrop a thou- 
sand pounds of capital and a work crew 
of indentured servants, many of whom ran 
away when they heard they were going 
to the wilds of America. Jail was better 
than that! 

When, after a search from Maine to 
Plymouth, he decided to locate in Quincy, 
Winthrop was also granted 3,000 acres 
of land, with subsidiary land rights else- 
where in the colony, and a 21 -year mo- 
nopoly . 

The operation was deemed of such 
importance that the iron workers were 
given exemption from militia duty, this at 
a time when war was imminent with the 
Narragansctt Indians and with Ninigret, 
the sachem of the Niantics. 



The first iron was turned our in 1644, 
but young Winthrop was fired the next 
year to be succeeded by Richard Leader. 
It is interesting to note that one of 
America's earliest magnates toiled for a 
salary of 100 pounds a year. 

The ore from which iron was blasted 
on the banks of Furnace Brook came from 
the swamps and bogs. It was not a high 
quality product. Water power from a dram 
thrown across the Brook was inadequate. 
Quincy iron ore proved to be more ex- 
pensive than the imported kind. 

The Company of Undertakers ap- ' 
pealed for fresh money in 1646 and ap- 
parently there were enough investors 
ready to send good money after bad be- 
cause the furnace was still in operation in 
1650 when the Scotch Prisoners arrived. 

The Scots were rugged Highlanders, 
soldiers in the army of the future King 
Charles II who were captured in the Battle 
of Dunbar. They suffered the fate com- 
mon to most 17th Century prisoners of 
war. 

Cromwell shipped 272 of them to New 
England, cheap labor in an effort to make 
Quincy iron works a paying proposition. 
It didn't work. The Company of Under- 
takers went bankrupt in 1653 and "the 
Woods" went back to the bear and the 
deer. 

Meanwhile, with the same Richard 
Leader as agent, construction began on 
a second iron works on the North Shore 
in Saugus in 1646. When it was com- 
pleted in 1650 it was recognized as the 
first integrated iron industry in America. 



The remains of the John 
Winthrop «lr. Blast Fumace are 
located in Hall Cemetery on 
Crescent St., West Quincy. 






RESTAURANT 




m 






62 SUMNER STREET, QUINCY 

LOCATED OFF WASHINGTON STREET 

CALL FOR DIRECTIONS! 
617-472-1900 



LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS 

Daily Lunch Specials prom $3.95! 

Early Bird Special 

with soup or salad along with dessert 
only $6.95. 2-5 PM 

Dinner Specials from $6,95! 

• Lobster specials everyday 

• Variety of seafood specials daily 

• King Cut Prime Rib (of coune) everyday 

Wednesday is Italian Night! 

Selections include: 

• Jumbo Shrimp Sicilian • Lobster Scampi 

• Chicken, Broccoli & Ziti • Veal Parmesan 
Monday & Tuesday Prime Rib Special 

"A Special Rib at a Special Price" 

Perfect far family gatherings! 

Gift Certificates Available 

YOU WONT BE DISAPPOINTED! 




iM ■' 



■»■■■•?■■ 



% V-.V-; 



•vir: 



F"-"' •' •.•'•■',"A''-i'! ■*•"•■■ 1 * 



:••• 



IsM 



.^^ 



<.■■:• 






s'osiciCo'd 

L ^ J 



.v!iiHCCS^! 



Pagc22A Tli* QulBCiy Bun Thnndjiy, July 1, 1999 



Celebrating our 

50th Anni-s^ersary 

Cott^UmtnU of 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 




RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 1NDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

(617) 472-6344 



Come See Why After 54 Years, 
We Are Still the South Shore's 
Favorite Choice for Appliances, 
Horne Electrorilcs and Tires 



John Qu'mcy Adams: 

The Old Flame 
Still Burned 

The old man's bitterness glowed 
from every word as he penned 
them in his diary on June 17, 
1843, the day the Bunker Hill 
Monument was dedicated. 

"What a name in the annals of man- 
kind is Bunker Hill! What a day was the 
17th of June, 1775! And what a burlesque 
upon them both is an oration upon them 
by Daniel Webster!" 

The oU man despised Webster as a 
turncoat to his own heritage, one whose 
compromises had sold out to slavery. 

"The kical associations thundering can- 
non, which I heard, and the smoke of 
burning Charlestown, which I saw, on that 
awful day .. How could I have witnessed 
all this at once, without an unbecoming 
burst of indignation. 

"Daniel Webster is a heartless traitor 
to the cause of freedom; John Tyler [the 




President] is a slave-monger. What have 
these to do with the Quincy granite pyra- 
mid on the brow of Bunker Hill? 

"I stayed home .. " 

The old flame still burned in John 
Quincy Adams at 75. 



16 Other Quincys 



There are 16 other Quincys in the 
United States. 

They are in: 

California, Rorida, Illinois, Indiana, 
Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Mis- 
sissippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington and 
West Virginia. 

Quincy, Mass. and Quincy, 111. have 



become sister sisters and keep close ties. 
William Morrill set out in 1998 as our 
Quincy 's "ambassador of Goodwill" to 
visit the other 16 Quincys, covering the 
12,000-mile motor trip in 27 days. 

He brought greetings of Mayor James 
Sheets and memento gifts from the city, 
businesses and residents. 




Ej MAYTAG 





^SUB-ZEROT^ 



SUB-ZEROJ ROPER* 






TOSHIBA HITACHI EUREKA Panasonic. TAPPAJl. Ki«ch«nAl«i* saB3BrjEMiM-A« MAGNAVQK 

BOSCH ifcsS R^^ RCil llwagicchef ^uurv^ SHARP. HFRiGiDAiRE Thermador' 



hta 



Joe Palumbo's 



OpenlUei&Thiirs 
nights till 9pm! 

FREE PARKD^G! 
FREyBtNSLIVERY! 



hancock tire & appliance 

Sales • Service • Parts • Installations 

115 Franklin Street, Quiiicy, MA 02169 

(Next to the Historic Adams Birthplaces) 

472-1710 



hta 



90 Days 
Same-As-Cash or 



Thonday.Jalljr 1,1999 Tli« Qaiikoy Sun P«pe23A 



Citi} Hall 

Seat Of Government 
. For 155 Years 



Daniel and Hannah French 
deeded the land to the town 
of Quincy for $1,000 with 
the stipulation that it "shall 
not be used for any other purpose than 
as a place for a Town House and for the 
said Inhabitants." 

And, with a few minor transgressions 
of that vow, the solid structure of Quincy 
granite on Quincy Square has been just 
that for the past 155 years, the nerve cen- 
ter of government for the town and then 
the city. 

It was the great hall on the second floor 
that the popular John Quincy Adams 11, 
grandson of a President of the United 
States, held forth as town moderator for 
many years and, with his brother, Charles 
Francis Adams Jr., gave informal direc- 
tion to town affairs. 

One of the earliest ordinances passed 
by the first City Council on March 8, 1889 
was the adoption of the City Seal embla- 
zoned with the four most significant dates 
in Quincy's history: 

1625, for the first settlement on 
Mount Wollaston; 1640, for its separa- 
tion from Boston as the town of Braintree; 
1792, for its separation from Braintree 
as the town of Quincy; and 1888, for its 
incorporation as a city. 




CITY HALL 

Designed by the architect Solomon 
Willard-who received $280 for drawing 
up the plans and superintending construc- 
tion for five months-the City Hall was 
completed and occupied for the first time 
on Nov. 1, 1844. 

It cost exactly $19, 1 15.93 to build, in- 
cluding 88 cents to John Briesler for lead 
to seal the chimney. 

In 1979, when a 3 and one half story 
reflective glass addition was built behind 
the old City Hall, the cost was $1.9 mil- 
lion. 



Since 1 851 

Providing Insurance 

Products & Services 

Through Its Independent 

Insurance Agents 




QUINCY MUTUAL 
FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY 



57 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 



617-770-5100 



800-899-1116 




The YMC A is a great place 
to go for any kid. 

For some kids, it's the only 
great place to go. 



The truth is, because of family 
problems or low incomes, a lot of 
kids can't afford the opportunities 
to go places and be with adults who 
can give them the caring attention 
that they need. 

That's why the YMCA is so 
important. We give kids the 
positive experiences they need to 
grow up prepared for happy and 
productive lives. But we always 
run out of money before we run out 
of kids. 

Support the place that 
supports kids and families. The YMCA 

617-479-8500 




Page24A Tli* Quiaoy Sun Thnnday, July 1, 1999 




PAINTING BY Albert Herter shows John Adams, 
Samuel Adams and James Bowdoin at work on the 



John Adams 'Father' 



Massachusetts Constitution in the law office of John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace, Franklin St., Quincy. 

(Photo Courtesy) of The Quinc\; Historical Societ}^) 



U.S., State Constitution Both Born Here 




uincy, birthplace of John Adams, 
I John Quincy Adanns and John 
Hancock, also has claim to the 
"the U.S. Constitution. 

The seed for this precious document 
was planted here. 

The U.S. Constitution was modeled 
after the Massachusetts Constitution 
which was written by John Adam.s, 
Samuel Adams and James Bowdoin in the 
law office of the John Quincy Adams 
birthplace in Quincy. 

There is every reason to believe that 
John Adams did not want to go the Mas- 
sachusetts Constitution Convention in 
Cambridge in 1779. 

He had arrived home only seven days 
before on the French frigate La Sensible 
after nearly 18 months in Paris helping 
to negotiate a commercial and military 
alliance with France. He was in such a 
rush to get home that he apparently 
landed the day before La Sensible reached 
Boston by rowing ashore from Nantasket 
Roads. 

He missed his wife, Abigail, terribly, and 
she him. 

"One was angry, another was full of 
Greif, and the third with Melancholy, so 
that I burnt them all," he wrote to her 
from Passy on Dec. 18, 1778, listing his 
complaints with her most recent letters. 
"If you write me in this style 1 shall leave 



of writing intirely, it kills me. 

"Am I not wretched Enough, in this 
Banishment, without this? What Course 
shall I take to convince you that my Heart 
is warm? I beg you wodd never more write 
to me in such a strain for it really makes 
me unhappy." 

"How lonely are my days?" she wrote 
on a Sunday evening, Dec. 27, "How soli- 
tary are my Nights? How insupportable 
the Idea that 3000 leigues, and the vast 
ocean now devide us — but devide only our 
persons for the Heart of my Friend is in 
the Bosom of his partner." 

Somewhere on the vast ocean the two 
letters passed each other. 

Paris and the dissolute court of Louis 
XVI held small appeal to the F\iritan in 
John Adams, even when his closest ev- 
eryday companions were Dr. Benjamin 
Franklin, still with an eye for the ladies at 
age 73, and the swashbuckling Capt. John 
Paul Jones, half patriot, half pirate, who 
had just taken command of the leaky old 
East Indiaman he had renamed Bon 
Homme Richard. 

The American colonies, newly reborn 
as the United States of America, were 
going through the most dismal period of 
the War for Independence. Inflation was 
rampant: butcher's meat, a dollar to eight 
shillings a pound; flour, fifty dollars a hun- 
dredweight. The news from the fighting 



front was of death, privatictfi and horror. 

Like many Braintree wives wfiose hus- 
bands were away at war. Abigail Adams 
was forced into the unaccustomed role of 
head of the household, a function she filled 
with determination. 

"I cannot avoid sometimes repining that 
the gifts of fortune were not bestowed 
upon us, that I might have enjoyed the 
happiness of spending my days with my 
partner," she wrote, "but as it is, I think it 
my duty to attend with frugality and 
economy to our own private affairs; and 
if I cannot add to our little substance, yet 
see to it that it is not diminished." 

She abstained from drinking black mar- 
ket tea, allowing herself one tiny com- 
plaint: "I should like a little green (tea), 
but they say there is none to be had here. 
I only wish it for a medicine, as a relief to 
a nervous pain in my head to which I am 
sometimes subject." 

John Adams attended the opening ses- 
sion of the Constitutional Convention in 
Cambridge on Wednesday, June 1, 1779. 
On Saturday, he was named to a com- 
mittee of 30 to prepare the declaration 
of rights and the constitution. On Mon- 
day, the committee delegated the task to 
a subcommittee of three, John and 
Samuel Adams; and James Bowdoin. 

Thus it was that John Adams wound 
up in the law office of his home at the 



foot of Penn's Hill, paired with his fire- 
brand cousin, Sam, and his ailing friend, 
James Bowdoin, to write a Constitution 
of the United States. 

The patient, hard-working John 
Adams, of course, did most of the work. 

"I was by the Convention put upon the 
Committee — by the Committee upon the 
subcommittee — ^and by the subcommittee 
appointed a sub subcommittee — so that I 
had the honor to be principal Engineer," 
he wrote to his friend, Edmund Jennings. 
Payroll records indicate that he was paid 
90 pounds for his work. 

The so-called "Adams draft" of the 
Massachusetts Constitution was accepted 
by the Convention with a few alterations 
but by that time John Adams was long 
gone back to Europe, this time to help 
negotiate a treaty of jaeace with Britain 
and serve as America's first minister to 
London. He did not see the farm at the 
foot of Penn's Hill again for another eight 
years. 

But he was immensely heartened by 
these words from the pen of his ever-lov- 
ing Abigail, written on Oct. 15, 1780: 

"Our Massachusetts Constitution is read 
with admission in New York and pro- 
nounced by the Royal Governor as the 
best republican form he ever saw. " Quincy 
Adams Birthplace, Franklin St., Quincy. 



Thursday, July 1, 1999 Tl&« Quinoy 8iu& Pagc25A 




NEWS QUINCyi 



f 






0f(^ 







4. 



'.Qui 




"ley's 



'^^syciifl, 



""'Sr^atZfy'^co. 



^^ys Off 



«verai 



'"'^'^"gprol 




THE RECYCLING 
PROGRAM ACCEPTS: 



NEWSPAPER 
& MAGAZINES 




'■'M/7|: 









N'.i^*;>-«^. 



^'*v:'i 




GLASS 
(No Uds) 



'..■j;^' 



''TV',. 



•'Ajf. 5'., .•-.'...- J 







PLASTIC #1 & #2 
(No Caps) 






^ift- 



^fm^i 



e 










ALUMINUM & 
METAL CANS 



^^ncbi 




kfolid 



--Ti*v.<^i 



*^f6i- 



?J^oxi 



tbi 



PHONE BOOKS 



Wat,!^ -""^0 yon ^- "vaQrf»i,._ 




CEREAL BOXES 
(Remove Liners) 

CARDBOARD 




JUNK MAIL 







No Plastic Bags 
in Recycling 
Bins, Please 



RECYCLING DROP-OFF FACILITY 

LOCATED BEHIND THE DPW, 55 (rear) Sea Street 

Open Dawn till Dusk 



SUPPORTED BY: MAYOR JAMES SHEETS. THE QUINCY RECYCLING COMMITTEE. DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS AND CITY COUNCILLORS: PETER 
KOLSON. BRUCE AYERS. TIM CAHILL. FRANCIS McCAULEY. MICHAEL D'AMICO. STEPHEN DURKIN. PAUL HAROLD. PATRICK McDERMOTT. DANIEL 
RAYMONDI AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSIONER DAVID COLTON. 



"^ < 



.v*^ 



Page26A Tl&« Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July i, 1999 



To Be Part Of 

Quincy's Proud History 

Is A Proud Honor 




Quincy Lodge No. 1295 
Order Sons of Italy in America 




120 Quarry Street, Quincy 

100+ Beno every Thursday Evening 
Doors Open at 4:45pm 





THE GRANITE RAILWAY 



The Granite Railwai; 

First Commerical 
Railroad In U.S. 



It was the darndest looking contraption 
that many among the distinguished gath- 
ering had ever seen. 

Each of the three wagons had four 
wheels, six and one half feet in diameter, 
surmounted by a smaller gear wheel which 
was used to raise and lower the cargo plat- 
form that was slung low between the 
wheels. 

It rode on foot-high wooden rails, 
topped by iron plate, which rested on 
stone sleepers or cross ties, placed eight 
feet apart and firmly supported on crushed 
granite to a depth beyond the frost line. 
On Saturday, Oct. 7, 1826, the wag- 
ons were laden with 16 tons of the finest 
Quincy granite arxi the opening day guests 
were properly amazed when a single 
horse moved the whole thing with ease 
more than three miles to a special wharf 
on the Neponset River. 

The granite blocks, a particularly hard 
and weather-resistant stone capable of 
taking a brilliant polish, were en route to 
Charlestown, where they were building a 
monument to the Battle of Bunker Hill. 
The Granite Railway, the first such com- 
mercial venture in the United States, was 
built specifically to transport stone for the 
Bunker Hill Monument. 

That it became successful, and a model 
for others around the country, is a tribute 
to three vastly dissimilar men, the engi- 
neer Gridley Bryant, the architect 
Solomon Willard and the financier, Colo- 
nel Thomas Handasyd Perkins. 

Bryant was 27 at the time but already 
an engineer of note. He invented the eight 
wheeled railroad car and, when a fellow 
named Ross Winans of Baltimore sued to 
establish a patent on it, Bryant was able 
to prove his claim to the satisfaction of 
the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Willard, then 43, was a great bear of a 
man, gentle, obliging, industrious. Frivol- 
ity, it was saki, was alien to him arKl he 
was never known to run. He could be 
crotchety, too. He was a carpenter turned 
wood-carver, turned stone-carver and, fi- 
nally architect. 
Perkins was the autocratic, 52-ycar-old 



merchant king of Boston who was said to 
have been offered the post of Secretary 
of the Navy by President Washington and 
turned it down with the observation that 
he owned more ships than the Navy. 

It was Perkins who lobbied the 
Railway's charter through a puzzled and 
obstinate State Legislature, which had 
never been called upon to incorporate a 
commercial railroad before. It was Perkins 
who financed it, too, largely with his own 
money. 

Even in its early days, the Granite Rail- 
way was a tourist attraction of some mag- 
nitude. 

Daniel Webster, who used to stop off 
for a pick-me-up in Quincy en route from 
Boston and Washington to his home in 
Marshfield, viewed it and decided that it 
would never succeed because of the frost 
that would form on the rails in the winter. 

The President of the United States, a 
local boy named John Quincy Adams, 
visited in August, 1827, got caught in a 
thunderstorm and took shelter in a shed 
where Willard's stone-cutters were hack- 
ing away at monument granite. 

A group of visitors were riding up the 
Railway's incline in an empty car on July 
25, 1832, when the chain broke and cata- 
pulted them over a 40-foot cliff. One was 
killed in what may have been the first rail- 
road fatality in the United States. 

The Granite Railway Co. survived until 
1870, some 27 years after the Bunker 
Hill Monument was finished, when most 
of its track was taken over by the Old 
Colony Railroad, which in turn became a 
division of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford. 

Today much of the roadbed, over which 
freight moved commercially on rails for 
the first time in America, is buried under 
the macadam of the Southeast Express- 
way. 



The old Railway incline has been 
restored and b located at the dead 
end of Mullin Ave. in West Quincy. 
It is open to the public year 
around, 24 hours a day. There is 
no admission charge. 



Thunday, July 1,1999 TIm Qulnear Sun Pife27A 



I 



Hancock Cemetery 

Patriots, Early 

Settlers, Intrigue 

Buried Here 



Henry, the first Adams in 
Quincy, is buried there. So 
is the Rev. John Hancock, 
father of the first signer of 
the Declaration of Independence. And 
Cobnel John Quincy, for whom the city 
is named. 

But of all the 800 graves in the 
Hancock Cemetery, the Old Burying 
GrourKJ of Colonial Quincy, most intrigu- 
ing is one marked by a tombstone bear- 
ing this cryptic epitaph: 

"Erected to the memory of John R. 
Grieve: Died Nov. 12, 1850, age 22 
years, and Hannah Banks, his wife, died 
Nov. 12, 1850, age 15 years. Both of 
Zatnesville, Ohio. Deluded by the writings 
of A.J. Davis." 

The mystery of John and Hannah has 
never been fully solved. 

They came to Quincy in 1850, not as 
man and wife, but as male cousins, John 
Green and George Sands. They obtained 
work in a shoe factory but rarely left their 
lodgings on Elm St., spending long hours 
reading books on spiritualism. 

Co-Workers thought that George 
Sands looked frail, almost effeminate. It 
was widely suspected that "he" was a giri. 
A scheme was devised to test the theory. 

One day at lunch one of the shoe work- 
ers tossed George an apple. A man woukJ 
catch it by closing his legs; a woman by 
spreading her skirt. Guess what "George" 
did! 

Humiliated, John and Hannah never 
went back to the factory. Nor did they 
ever return to the house on Elm St. Their 
frozen bodies were found next spring by 
rabbit hunters on Penn's Hill, locked in a 
bving embrace. 

Several months later, the father of John 
Grieve arrived from Ohio to bury the 
young couple. It was he who directed the 
words to be chiselled on the headstone. 
He explained no further. 

A.J. Davis was never kientified for sure. 
But Andrew Jackson Davis, a spiritualist, 
hypnotist and faith healer, was then prac- 
ticing in Boston. 

Among the belongings found in the 
Elm. St. lodgings were these words, writ- 
ten by 15-year-old Hannah Banks: 

"To the oppressed and downtrodden, 
to the suffering and afflicted, I wouki cry 
out... Death is only an event, only a cir- 
cumstance in the eternal life experience 
of the human soul. Death is simply a birth 
into a new and perfect state of existence. " 

Not far from the grave of John arki 
Hannah is a tomb bearing words that cry 
out of an eariier injustk:e: 

"Three precious friends under this 
tombstone lie 

"Patterns to aged, youth arKi Infancy. 

"A great mother, her learned sc»i, with 




HANCOCK CEMETERY 

chiW. 

"The first and least went free. He was 
exiled. 

"In love to Christ, this country, and dear 
friends. 

"He left his own, cross'd seas and for 
amends 

"Was here extoll'd, and envy'd all in a 
breath, 

"His noble consort leaves, is drawn to 
death, 

"Stranger changes may befall us ere 
we die, 

"Blest they who will arrive eternity. 

"God grant some names, O thou New 
England's friend. 

"Don't sooner fade than thine, if times 
don't mend." 

The tomb with its hidden message con- 
tains the family of the Rev. Leonard Hoar, 
third preskient of Harvard College, a man 
too liberal for his times. 

He was forced by the General Court 
of the Massachusetts bay Colony to re- 
sign at the instigation of religious oppo- 
nents arKl jealous colleagues for permit- 
ting Harvard to "languish and decay." 
Bght months later, in November 1675, 
he was dead at 45. 

In 1975, the same General Court, now 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
righted the 300-year-old wrong done to 
the Rev. Mr. Hoar by "proclaiming and 
confirming his innocence of any misdeeds 
while president of Harvard College." 



The cemetery, on Hancock 
St^ Quincy Sq., next to Clly HaO, 
to open to the pubUc Tbete to 
no ndmtotkm chaiiQii 



Reporting news to you 

TODAY. 

Making news with you 

TOMORROW. 



WJDA has kept Quincy and the South Shore 

in the know since 1947... 

and we're proud to be travelling with you 

into the next millenium. . 

52 years and counting... 



Thanks for listening. 



1300* WJDA 

South Shore Broadcasting Company 



LINCII 

' Served Ut'ekda\s "' 

KurlvHIrd 
Minii Aviiiluble 



Rcs!aurant/I><)un;;e/tkincli()n Facilities 

*'* ... 

* LIVEKNTKRIAINMirNT . 

-^^-•^ Fri(la>s «*(; Satiir(la>s 

9piii show 



Sunday 

HriiiKh 

11-2 







\i«&;^j^ Jsi< V^'^- 






"*^ ** t.' 






• c::s3u>^z'^ M*-^ 









vv«i-<\.Kj.-. r' " C-" - ■ ^<; 



Closed Monday 
1 Entcrprisu Drive. N. Quincy . (617) 328-1600 



j^ 



Page 28A Tlkm Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 




MARINA PLACE 

Quincy 

Independent & Assisted Living 

A secure residential community featuring private 
rental apartments, a full range of services, private 
transportation, activities and companionship. Most 
importantly, competitive rates ensuring a Marina Bay 
location but not at Marina Bay prices. 

Come home to Marina Place and enjoy our Amelia 
Earhart Community Room, Presidents Library, and 
Shipyard Pub. Respite care and Memory Impairment 
Care Program available. 

Call (61 7)770-3264 to arrange a visit or get more 
information. 



(^ 



EQUAL HOUSINO 
OWORTUMITY 



617*7703264 

Four Seaport Drive, Quincy, MA 021 71 

www.seniorlivingresidences.com 



A. 



^m^ 



A Third Generation 
Continues Our Traditions. 

Quincy has changed a great deal since Sweeney F\ineral Home was 
established in 1917. But, it^ nice to know some things will never change. 
Like the observance of traditional values and customs. 

At Sweeney Funeral Homes, older residents are quick to notice the 
subtle reminders of yesteryear, such as the grey gloves our funeral 
director still wears. Like the characteristic top hat and tails that our 
founder, Dennis Sweeney, wore over 30 years ago, they reflect our 
Tradition. One that has been built on a dignified and instinctive concern 
for the city's bereaved families for three eenerations. 

Today, our founderls mnd-nephew, Dennis S. Sweeney has 
continued the femilyls philosophy of maintaining a beautiful, home-like 
atmosphere. . 

And like his namesake, who started pre-arrangements m the 19408, 
Dennis believes in helping resklents to plan for the future. Pre-planning 
means that this financial decision is not left for a fJamily to decide while 
they are attempting to cope with a major personal loss. It's a difficult 
time, a time when family members are teast able to make the wisest 

Sweeney Rineral Homes has been helping South Shore residents 
with difficult decisions for over 70 years. Call Dennis Sweeney at 
(617) 773-2728 for a free consuHation. There's no time like the present. 

, DENNIS SWEENEY 

^''V FUNERAL HOMES 

Quinq/'s First for Three Generations 

74 Elm Street • 326 Copeland Street 

617-773-2728 







ft^i. 



■-■-... -^.-^ 



,•■>.'•«• 










WELCOME TO WOIMSTON CENTllS 


We're Always Ready lb ServeiVbu! 


A-T Vacuum 


Jack Conway Realtor 


Beale St. Fish Market, Inc. 


James M. McDonough, D.D.S. 


BiACKwooD Pharmacy 


Keghane Funeral Home 


Century 21 Annex Realh, Inc. 


Lydon/Russell Funeral Home 


Colonial Federal Savings Bank 


Nancy's Nook 


Barry's Deu 


Mantis Florist 


Berry Insurance Agenq, Ing 


MULUNEY & MULLANEY, P.C. 


Brigham's Ice Cream Shop 


Newcomb Farms Restaurant 


Granite Group 


O'Brien's Bakery 


The Ink Spot 


Quincy Lock Co. 


The WoLL-Nur Shop 


Shea Real EsTATC 


Well's Grille, Inc. 


Sullivan's Corner Antiques 


Dependable Cleaners 


Optermetric Assoc, of Quinq 


Dot's Smoke Shop 


WoLusTON Florist 


Fleming, Barreh & Pheun, P.C. 


Bridgewahr Credft Union 


Coffee Break Cafe 


Quincy Youth Soccer 


Deware Funeral Home 


WoLU^ON Jewelers 


Granite City Self Storage 


World Wide Travel Agency Corp. 


Harry's Linoleum Tile & Carpet 




THEWOLLASTON 


BUSINESS 


ASSOCIATION 



DOHERTY & WHITE 
INSURANCE 

Affiliated With: 

Francesco LaRosa Insurance 
Bernard J. Tobin Insurance 

Call for our discounted auto 

and homeowner rates 
Auto • Condos • Apartments 

Life Insurance, Disability, Financial Planning 
Free Registry Service 

"We'll Come To You If You Can't Come To Us" 
Quotes Over The Phone 

617-773-4700 






353 Southern Artery, Quincy, MA 



Thunday.Jiily 1,1999 TIm Qulnoy Sun Page29A 



Centerpiece Of U.S. Naval Shipbuilding Museum 

USS Salem: The Newest Tourist Attraction 



The USS SALEM is one of Quincy's 
newest tourist attractions. 
Built at Quincy's renowned Fore 
River Shipyard, she became the Ragship 
of the United States Navy's Sixth Fleet 
during the Cold War years in the 1950s. 

The SALEM is over 700 feet long and 
carries the heaviest automatic main bat- 
tery guns in any warship of any navy's 
cruiser class. As the most powerful gunned 
warship in the fleet, she was a bulwark of 
democracy in the Mediterranean and the 
Caribbean Seas. 

She carried a crew of over 1 ,600 men 
arKl traveled at a top speed of 35 knots. 
Today, visitors can tour the Main Deck, 
Number 3 Turret, a 5-inch mount. 
Admiral's and Captain's Bridges, and 
other sources of interest. Scheduled 
guided tours by today's crew will take 
guests through the Second Deck where 
they can see how the SALEM's crew lived 
and worked. 

Of special note are the crew's gallery 
and bake shop, the barber shop, where 
one could get a haircut when the barber 
was on duty and the machine shops where 
the actual work is done to restore the ship. 
Real sailors will want to see the CIC (Com- 
bat Information Center), the nerve cen- 
ter of the ship where she was controlled 
and fought from; Engine Room 3 , where 



her powerful battleship dass propulsion 
system drove her through the sea; and 
her berthing compartments, where Sailor 
and Marine lived their lives. A well-stocked 
Museum Shop is on board in the ship's 
store where Salem hats, tee shirts, sou- 
venirs and gifts can be purchased. 

Senior citizens, school groups, and Boy 
Scouts and Girl Scouts as well as other 
organizations are welcome and cap re- 
serve tour times in advance if desired. The 
ship is available for overnight encamp>- 
ments and special activities. 

The main deck and other large spaces 
aboard the ship can be rented for |3arties, 
corporate meetings, dinner functions and 
other uses. An Operations Specialist can 
arrange for catering and other amenities 
to make the SALEM a great place to have 
a function. Tours are available daily, but 
large groups (20 or more) should make 
advance arrangements 

There will be period Motion Picture 
Films and the ever-present "training filrns" 
showing on board. 

Spring, summer and fall are the sun 
times aboard the ship, and with her aw- 
nings rigged, you will be transported to 
some of the SALEM's many ports of call. 
The museum's archivist will be open for 
research and viewing its extensive collec- 
tion of armaments, uniforms, and memo- 





'% ■ .4 «« 









i 




USS SALEM 



rabilia. 



The SALEM at the United States Na- 
val Shipbuilding Museum is a wonderful 



family experience for all. Visit history-rich 
Quincy, home of two U.S. Presidents, the 
Granite Industry, and the First Commer- 
cial railroad and have a memorable time. 



The U.S. Naval Shipbuilding Museum is located at tlie Fore River 
Sliipyard on Wharf St., Quincy. (Access is tlie same as Harbor Express 
boat). The SALEM is open Sunday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. (last tour at 4 p.m.) Admission Is $6 for adults, and $4 for senior 
citizens and children. Children ages 3 and younger are free. Flat-heeled 
shoes or sneakers are recommended. Paridng is free. 

The museum features a military ardiive, model shop and exhibits on 
the USS Salem, USS St. Paul, and Cruiser Sailor Association. 

For more information, call the Museum at (617) 479-7900. 



rl am the SALEM . . . -~ 

Flagship Sixthfleet 

Come aboard me daily at The United States Naval Shipbuilding Museum at the Fore River Shipyard 
in Quincy, where I was built and commissioned 50 years ago. 

Watch my crew bring me to life and learn about life aboard the last of the heavy cruisers 

- an Admiral's Flagship in the Mediterranean. 

Open Daily: 10 AM to 5 PM (Last Tour at 4:00 PM). 

$6.00 Adults. $4.00 Seniors and Children ages 4-12. Children under 4 - Free. 
Scheduled group tours (ten or more) $3.00 each. Self guided tours are permitted. 

Flat heeled shoes or sneakers recommended. Free Parking at the Museum, or take the 

Braintree Red Line to the Quincy Center Station and the 220 or 221 bus to the shipyard. 

For further information, (617) 479-7900 






\ 



Pi«e30A TlM Quixtoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



'First Ladies Of The Skies' 

Amelia Earhart, 
Harriet Quimby 
Had Quincy Ties 



Abigail Adams is not Quincy's only 
"First Lady. "The city also has tics 
to two "first ladies" of the skies: 
Amelia Earhart and Harriet Quimby. 

Earhart, the country's most famous 
aviatrix, who disappeared in the Pacific 
on an around-the-world flight in 1937. 
Her disappearance is still an intriguing 
mystery more than a half-century later. 

Quimby, although not as well known, 
actually was the first woman to earn a 
pilot's license. She flew here and died here 
in a tragic Airmeet crash. 

A resident of Medford at the time, 
Earhart was one of five stockholders in 
the Dennison Airport established on a 
nine-acre marshland tract at Quincy Shore 
Drive and East Squantum St., North 
Quincy. 

The Beechwood Community Life Cen- 
ter is now located on part of the site across 
from historic Moswetuset Hummock 
where the Moswetuset Indians settled and 
from which the name Massachusetts is 
derived. 

Earhart flew on the first official flight 



from Dennison Sept. 30, 1927. She took 
flying lessons here and flew regularly here 
throughout 1927 and 1928. 

She demonstrated the Kinner aircraft 
and was a strong advocate of women in 
aviation. 

She later bought a Fokker monoplane 
from Commander Richard E. Byrd — who 
would become the famed North Pole ex- 
plorer — and flew it across the Atlantic, the 
first woman to accomplish that feat. 

Byrd was stationed at the Squantum 
Naval Air Base which adjoined the 
Dennison Airport and today is the Ma- 
rina Bay area. 

Quincy's first Aeromeet held in 1910 
marked the beginning of New England's 
aviation history. The 1910 meet coincided 
with the country's first air show held in 
California. Other Quincy meets followed 
in 1911 and 1912. 

Harriet Quimby, the first woman to fly 
the English channel in 1911 — the week- 
end the Titanic sank — came to Squantum 
to compete in the third Aeromeet in 





QUINCY'S INTERGENERATIONAL 
COMMUNITY CENTER 

Unique setting . . . Historic Site . . . Marina Bay 

SOUTH SHORE S LARGEST 
SINGLE SITE CHILD CARE CENTER 

• Professional Staff • Small Classes • Year-round Program 

Custom Designed Playgrounds • Developmentally Appropriate Curricula 

Spacious Grounds/Playfields • Gymnasium 

Nationally Accredited 

MULTI-PURPOSE SENIOR CENTER 

Varied and Expanding Intergenerational Programs and Services 

MUSIC SCHOOL & PERFORMING ARTS 

• All Instruments and Voice • Performing Ensembles 

• Private/Group Lessons • Musical Performances 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION, ENRICHMENT & SPECIAL EVENTS 





AVIATION HISTORY INFORMATION CENTER 

SITE OF QUINCY'S AVIATION HISTORY 
1910-1 1-12 Air Shows/Dennison Airport/Squantum Air Station 



We're proud to be "making history" at such an historic site. 

440 East Squantum Street, Quincy, MA 02171 • (617) 471-5712 
Call or stop by for Summer Program schedule! 



HARRIET QUIMBY 

1912. And met a tragic death. 

On July 1, she took off from the 
Harvard Aviation Field on East Squantum 
Street for a 27-mile demonstration flight 
out to the Boston Light. As her Bleriot 
turned around the Light and headed back, 
the plane nosed down and plummeted 
into Dorchester Bay. As a horrified crowd 
watched, Quimby's passenger, William 
Willard, manager of the Aeromeet, and 
then Quimby, fell from the plane into the 
harbor waters. The plane nosed over on 
impact. And was undamaged. Both 
Quimby and Willard were killed. 

Fifteen years later in 1927 the 
Dennison Airport, Quincy's first and only 
commercial airport was founded with two 
1,800-foot strips. It had a brief life sf)an 
of 14 years on marshland leased from the 
U.S. government by Harold T. Dennison, 
a Quincy architect. 

The airport's stucco hangar and office 
buikiing became a landmark until it closed 
in 1941. It is now the site of the Aviation 
History Info Center at the Beechwood on 
the Bay. 

In an era when most women were not 
employed or career-oriented, Earhart and 



AMELIA EARHART 

Quimby were quite unkjue. 

Both were educated, employed, and 
self-sufficient with multiple community, 
career and public roles. Neither were suf- 
fragettes or active feminists, but both were 
gifted, courageous and tireless women — 
promoting and demonstrating equal rights 
for women. Both were published journal- 
ists and photographers. Both met timely 
and tragic deaths. 

The historical significance of our site 
has prompted study, information gather- 
ing, research and collections of early avia- 
tion photos and artifacts. Quincy's Avia- 
tion History Info Center evolved from 
three years of community meetings and 
wonderful help from aviation history buffs, 
journalists, aviation historians, and inter- 
ested community folk. Our understand- 
ings, learning, activities and events focus 
upon the history of our site where avia- 
tion in New England began. 

Aviation History meetings are open to 
all and hekl at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 - First 
Aeromeet Aircraft: Wright's & 
Bleriot's. Sept. 15 • Squantum Air 
Station: The First Mears. Photogra- 
phy Display. 




BEAUTIFUL VIEW of Boston's slcyline is from Squaw Rocli area of 
Squantum. At right is the Myles Standish Cairn erected in 1895 to com- 
memorate his visit liere Sept. 30, 1621-tlie first recorded visit of white 
men to this locality. He was guided across the baby by Tisquantum or 
Squanto who became the early settlers' friend and benefactor. S<|piantum 
was named after him. 



Tkwsaa7,Jiil7l,lM* ThaQulooySuit Pafe31A 



Moswetuset Hummock 



'Birthplace Of Massachusetts' 



The Indians saw it was a hill 
(wetuset) siiaped like an arrow 
head (mos) so they called it 
"Moswetuset" and when English 
tongues got through mangling the word 
it came out "Massachusetts," which be- 
came the name of the bay and then the 
state. 

The little wooded hillock near the 
junction of East Squantum St. and 
Quincy Shore Drive was once the seat 
of the sachem Chickatabot, who comes 
down through the pages of Quincy as a 
rather pathetic figure. 

He was the chief of the Moswetuset 
Indians, a once great tribe that occu- 
pied the coast north of Plymouth. 

A few years before, under the great 
sachem Nanepashemet, the 
Moswetuset had been able to field some 
3,000 warriors for a war with the 
Nanepashemet was killed. 

Then came the plaque. 

In two years the mighty Moswetuset 
were all but wiped out. No more than 
60 of them were left to till their fields 
on the banks of the Neponset River. Sa- 
chem Chickatabot fled his home on the 
hill in Wollaston and took refuge on 
Moswetuset Hummock. 

That was the situation in 1621 when 
Capt. Myles Standish landed from a 
















..,■ >.^^- . 






g^L^ 










'■M ■ »#»***^- ^^ 


^^v* 


mB^Mi 


^-^BPfp «... 






* 


''^^ *#* J^^^'^^Nfif 




^fHHjpi^^r^^ 






1 


^ 


/ -;^-^ .- 












^ 


* ■ ■© '. ll*^ 


i' ' ^1 


L jM 


tl&:^ r ' 


* 


■* 


III 1 


%" >■* i^l .^pT 


■^ 


tiilh ^^mI 


Tm i, ^W H «^ ■ ^"^ *li 1 






^^H 


•: ^^' >*"! ^ 


■■i 




1 ?;■;«;* »"|, 


mim 


1 


^\i. ^^^^H 


-•■,«i^^ ■ .!.■* 


\^^.^--JL Ife. .^ 


i»iBis"3^^^*#i 


E^ 


.M ' ~'^dH^ 


^#- 


^::; 




*;%Pi^-- fe>H „ ;■' jtt' 




■■'W^. ■*!"/■»■ f 


^st."' 


smit <||pp»»'-' 


M^ 


i-'- 






% 









MOSWETUSET HUMMOCK 



shallop with an exploring party of Ply- 
mouth Pilgrims that included the Indian 
gukle Squanto (or Tsquantum), whose 
name was given to the peninsula that 
stuck out in the bay. 

The tragic Chickatabot died not long 
after the Pilgrims' visit and we was suc- 
ceeded as sachem by his son, Josiah 
Wampatuck, a boy who knew a good 



deal when he saw one. 

Wampatuck sokl what was left of his 
virtually deserted tribal lands to a group 
of whites for 12 pounds, 10 shillings. 
The lands included most of what is to- 
day the city of Quincy and the towns of 
Braintree, Randolph and Holbrook. 

Moswetuset Hummock is the oldest 
state park in Massachusetts and is on 



the National Registry. 



Moswetuset Hummock, 
identilied by a marker stone 
and maintained in its natu- 
ral state. Is open to tlie pub- 
lic. There is no admission 
charge. 




LORETTA T. DEGRAZIA 

Owner-President 

Recipient of the "1999 Blue Chip Enterprise Initiative Award" 

N£.W£.0.'s "1998 Businesswoman of the Year" 



EAST 

COAST 

PETROLEUM 

■W'v Make 

Winter 
Bearable'^" 




EAST COAST PETROLEUM 

"WE MAKE WINTER BEARABLE " 

i . 

"Proud to be a part of this great city " 

Give Quincy a Chance! 

We did, and we're glad 

to be part of a city rich with 

history, heritage and tradition. 

Quincy Oil Cooperative 
A Division of East Coast Petroleum 



235 ATLANTIC STREET, NORTH QUINCY, MA 02171 

QiLHEAT 617-786-9300 




32A 



Tkanday, Jvlty 1, 1999 




In Quincy's Historic District 






RYDER'S 
CURTAINS 

Ready-made & Custom Curtains & Draperies 

Bed, Batti & Unen 

PROFESSIONAL FREE SHOP AT HOME DECORATING SERVICE 

FREE PARKING 
HOURS: 9:00-5:30 DAILY, THURS TILL 8:00 

1489 Hancock Street, Quincy Center • 617-77^1888 

Visit our website: tx)ston.com/ryderscurtains 



SHOP THE EXPERTS! 

As featured on... **Chronicle" -A5C 

"The Real Dear ATBC 
"Undercover" - fox 



f^^ /leirelrv 



1402 Hancock Sf., Quincy 

(BonkBoston Building) 



Jeirelry 

' 617-773-3636 

wwwjo9Mfs|cwMvy*coiii 



PHASE II JEWELRY & GIFTS 

Fine Jewelry at Discount Prices 

• Quincy Commemorative Afghan 

(South Boston, Boston, Milton k Dorchester also Available) 
• Quincy Potteiy (other dties and towns available) 

* [^ f^ M^ * J^mm^ Collectibles 

• Mufiy Bears • Boyd's Bears 

Quincy Clocks, Mirrors, Key holders & Ornaments 

Also, other fine commemorative items. 

"Hi Eileen!" Shipping Available 

1361 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY SQUARE (617) 472-6618 




Flavin Insurance Acienc y 



Since 1925 

Let Us "Quote" Your Renewals & Non-Renewals 

Discounts Available 

Representing A-¥ Companies 

• Auto • Home • Business • Flood 
• Life • Marine • Condos • Apartments • Umbrellas 



6 17-479-1 (too 



1085 Hancock Street, Quincy Center 




TaI(e A SwoHTtmxx^ 
HiswRic OuiNcy In CoMfour^ 

* Hush Puppy Chippewa *Trotte(s»Wolvefine*}MUHs ^ 
*M Spot *Sebago* Dexter* Converse 'HemrnSuimis *% 



FHAMLOM'S 

I /\MII ^ SI K )| S I ( )KM 
Ml M W ( )MI l\l ( I III I )KM rsl 

y/R ( ( )1 I AC .t \\ I (.)l IN( > (/,!/) I//- ivy/) 

M. ,1 K's \l(,\(|\s Sam u'Jw V ^( > AM /.OOIM 



'T^ggyi'. 



TROPHIES • AWARDS • JACKETS • TEAM OUTFIHERS 

Custom 
• Engraving • Embroidery • Sillcscreening 

9 SCHOOL STREET, QUINCY CENTER 
Call for a Free Catalog! (617) 472-3090 

www.goodhues. com 





o5eann*6..^ 



Featuhfi^ the works of over 
QO local crafters and arPisans 

CoitfiPnfCrafPs* flags fx Wndsocks* New tnglandNotecards^Ciift baskets 

featuring ^ifp Items for all Occashfis 

Opefi5daifs. Tites. M.SaPfO-5. Wed ThurslO-^ 

70e>^ Hancock ^-.Qy/n^ (d^f^ 7^^3-4333 

(acrosts from Pkt HisPorie WooOmira ■School) 



m^g) Reasons to visit Quincy' s HomctoMH Canuru Store 



ff. PHOTOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT-bought and sold », REPAIRS - camera and 
video #. CUSTOM HLM DEVELOPING-coior and B&W film, 16mm to 4" x 5" 
«• WORKSHOPS f • CHILDRENS & TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS #. Kodak 
Dealer- imaging services F. LARGEST USED CAMERA SELECTION south of 
Boston •• We buy collectibles 9. IN-STORE CUSTOM B&W DEVELOPING 
AND PRINTING-Also available: one-hour color lab. !•• BEST OF 
ALL- We're open weekdays from 9:00am for all your camera needs, 
and you can find us on the web www.presidentialcamera.com 

Presidential Camera 

1422 HaKOck Street, Quucy, MA 02169 • (617) 47M437 



DUNKIN DONUTS 

proud to be a part 
ofQuincy's History 

1462 Hancock Street 1250 Hancock Street 

543 Southern Artery 
825 Southern Artery 





Famous Seafood 

QF SOUTH BOSTON 



%«-^ KELLY'S 

««f KELLY'S P»U>B 



35 Cottage Avenue, Quincy, MA 02169 

617-745-0202 Fax: 617-745-0201 

Open 7 days a weelcfrom Ham 



Thunday.Jaly 1,1999 Tb« Qolaosr Sua Pi«e33A 




STONE LIBRARY, the oldest Preskleiitial library In the nation, is located 
on the property of the Adams National Historic Site **01d House" at 135 
Adams St. Charles Francis Adams had it built in 1870 to posthumously 
honor the wish of his fatlier, John Quincy Adams, who died in 1848. 
The building holds about 13,000 volumes that belonged to John 
Adams, John Quincy Adams and other family members. 




FLOWER BEDS located on the property of the Adams National Historic 
Site '*Old House" peak at about 6,000 flowers in the sununer including 
veronicas, irises, dahlias, zinnias and many others. The property also 
has a Yorkist rosebush from England, planted by Abigail Adams in 
1788, located behind the Stone Library which can be seen at left. 




In Quincy^sllistoric 



We are a neighbor to the Abigail Adams Cairn... 

EL O W E R LAND! 
QAROEN CENTER. FLORIST ft GIFTS ■■ 

...and your full-service florist, 
garden center & unique gift shop! 

Also remember us for Weddings • Funerals • Special Occasions 
326 Franldin Street, Quincy, MA 02169 • 617-479-2020 



Early American Restaurant 

The Best Burgers in Quincy 
SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH 



EARLY BIRD SPECIAL between 7 & 9am 
Two EggSf Home/ries, Toasi, Bacon, ^/% Q^ 
Ham or Sausage with Coffee or Juice m^^»^ V ^ 



HAMBURGER SPECIAL 
including Fries 4k Shake 



■ W» " » " I I 



"•■i"~iPW|-Pi""*i 



$5.95 



Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-3pmy Sat & Sun 7am-2pm 
1054 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 617-328-8225 





RagMrHion Mon-Sat. 0-4 

617-471-3800 
221 Partdngway. Quincy 




Fully aquippadgyiti 
TirtiteTaamt s: yourchW 



B«0imMMr thni AdvAnbMl 
AgMSatUii 




Kim Fbrd 
Director 



laamliio to Play- haying to Laarn. 
Aoatt9&u|> 
Futyqui ail a d , 




i* 




Historic Quincy 's Hometown Newspaper 

Today ^s Quincy Sun Is Tomorrow's Quincy History. 

We are proud to be part of it and to record it for posterity, 

1372 Hancock Street, Quincy • (617) 471-3100 




Pagc34A Til* Quiaoy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1999 



Neighbors Had A Nickname 

Duchess Of Windsor 
Once Lived Here 



The Duchess of Windsor is a name in 
Quincy's more modern history. 

She lived here in Wollaston while mar- 
ried to a young Navy lieutenant stationed 
at a Naval air school in Squantum in 
1917. 

The Massachusetts Naval Militia had a 
training field in what is now the Marina 
Bay area which was taken over by the 
First Naval District as an air training 
school. 

Assigned the head of the air school at 
the site which later became the Squan- 
tum Naval Reserve Air Base was Lt. Earle 
W. Spencer. 

He was married to the former Wallis 

Warficld who later would become the 

Duchess of Windsor when King Edward 

VIII abdicated his throne in 1936 "for the 

* woman I love" — a woman twice divorced. 

Some thought the king should be al- 
lowed to marry her and keep his title as 
long as she did not become queen. But 
stronger opposition prevailed and he 
stepped down. 

They were married on June 3, 1937. 

While here, shfe'and Spencer lived in a 
second-floor apartment on Davis St. in 
Wollaston. 




DUCHESS OF WINDSOR 

Legend has it that her Wollaston neigh- 
bors thought she was somewhat snobbish. 

They nicknamed her "The Duchess" 
never dreaming that one day she would 
really be one. 



THINK CHANGE.,. 

(The early Colonists did.) 

Call 328-0100 



Doran & Horrigan 

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
North Quincy, MA 02171 



P.S. Wouldn't you like to obtain a *^2nd opinion 



9" 



J 



The Nimitz Connection 



Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz, of 
World War D fame, is arK)ther name 
with a connection to Quincy's mod- 
ern history. 

Nimitz, who directed the U.S. Naval 
operations in the Pacific after Japan's 
sneak attack at Pearl Harbor, was mar- 
ried to a Quincy girl. 

Catherine Vance Freeman and Nimitz 
were wed April 9, 1913 at her family's 
home at 40 Grand View Ave., Wollaston. 
Her father, Richard, was a former city 
council president. 

Rev. Carl G. Horst, who was minister 
of the then Wollaston Unitarian Church 
on Winthrop Ave., performed the cer- 
emony. 

Nimitz was 28 and Catherine 21 on 
the day of their wedding which he recalled 
years later as "the happiest day of my life. " 
It was the first marriage for both. They 
apparently met while Nimitz was in 
Quincy waiting for the submarine to which 
he was assigned to be outfitted at the Fore 
River Shipyard. 

Nimitz's name was one of the most fa- 
mous of World War II as a commander- 
in-chief of the Pacific fleet. 

Under his leadership, the Navy staged 
a spectacular comeback after the disaster 
at Pearl Harbor, winning such strategic 
battles as Midway, the Solomons, the Gil- 
bert and Marshall Islands, the Marianas, 
Philippines, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. 

Nimitz was aboard the USS Missouri 
with General Douglas MacArthur as a 
signer for the United States in the Japa- 
nese surrender ceremonies Sept. 1, 1945. 
Nimitz died just before his 81st birth- 
day in February, 1966 in San Francisco 
after suffering a stroke. 

Catherine, a daughter and a grandson 
were at his bedside. 

The Admiral Nimitz Museum was es- 
tablished in Frederisburg, Tex. where he 
was born. 

According to the museum, there were 
four chiWren. three daughters and a son. 
The latter followed in his father's footsteps 
and became an admiral. 

The museum says Mrs. Nimitz died 
"several years after" her husband's death 
but the chiklren are still living, although it 
doesn't say where. 

Nimitz and Quincy had another con- 
nection. 

Many of the great fighting ships that 
played a major role under Nimitz in the 
final vk;tory over Japan were built here at 
the Fore River shipyard in his wife, 
Catherine's, hometown. 

A total of 227 Navy ships of all sizes 
were built here during the war, among 
them battleships, aircraft carriers, cruis- 
ers, destroyers, destroyer escorts and 
LSTs. 

And, among them were such fannous 
names as Massachusetts, Lexington, 
Wasp, Quincy, Boston, Canberra, etc. 

And not to forget that tough old 
battlewagon, the Nevada, commissioned 
here in 1916 and still going strong at the 




CHESTER NIMITZ 



*4i 



^- 



CERTiFICATE OF MARRIAGE. 



YIiIB ^MnHMflW MHK ■© wMPPWV ■• W© pwfWBW IVVlVv V^HVM W 9KttfW09 



IM IWIMi D MRBI K nUUT m TBUnH, Ml IWaD MtU» 




■■■■^ fiiyti iwla « .-T>M«-Ai 



40 awi TXm An^SulJMl. 

I- ..il.lMM 

^. yiy^ 



•WMTI^wi- 



fl iki CU» t Qnlaoy. -- . -i Mi JItg n !•». <Ui 

>-<.-_ , m ■ -<^^!^!7<!Cj^.;g;r:^- - -cu>.ai* 

Certificato of Mm Officiating Clargyman or IMagiatrato. 

I iMflby certify *U l JM «h« atm >«^ liMB l> >uila|k it 




iZ^s-I^J^%^^^^^ 



1M> Mnwui^ nf^ il»mmt, mmm, > n « n iri Dm am mm iw* Mr< •• ■» MMk 



outbreak of WorU War II. 

She was at Pearl Harbor, that day of 
infamy, Dec. 7, 1941 when the Japanese 
planes sneaked in. Though bombed and 
damaged, she was the only battle able to 
get underway that fateful day during the 
attack. 

She lived to fight at Normandy and 
went back to the Pacific for the bloody 
battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. 

She was a symbol of Quincy shipbuikl- 
ing know-how. 

Her career came to an end as a "guinea 
pig" for the Bikini atoll atom bomb tests 
in 1946. 

But not without a final display of her 
Quincy-built ruggedness. 

She survived two atomic bomb blasts 
during the tests, the 16-inch guns of the 
battleship Iowa and repeated attacks by 
Navy dive bombers. 

Finally, torpedoes from the planes did 
Iv>r in and ^ went grudgingly to her rest. 
Gone, but like Nimitz, not forgotten. 



Thursday, July 1,1999 Tl&« Qulnoy Sua Pagc35A 



Calendar Of Special Events 



FRIDAY, JULY 2 
Faraer't Market l-\cr\ Friday through (Xlnber 
2V Johii Hancock Municipul Pariing lot, 1 1 .W a m 
-5()0pm 

SUNDAY, JULY 4 
FMrHi sf July: Indepcndcacc Forr\er! Ihibhc 
invited to play a part m one of our nation's greatest 
dramas, the passage of the Declaration of 
Independence Adams National lUstoncal Park. 
Sunday, July 4. Carnage House, 135 Adams Street. 
Quincy, ll(»Oam- 1 (Xt pm , 2 00 pm -400pm, 
&706pm -900pm CalRM 7)770-1! 75 for more 
information and reservations Free 

w^^•^^ nps go\ /adam 

TUESDAY, JULY 6 
Galapagos Puppet Theater. Iliomas Crane l\ihlic 
Library, Adams Shore Branch, 7 00 p m Ages 5 and 
older 

Story Hour. Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 7 00 pm Dottie Moynihan will 
present a paiama time sti>ry hour for children under 5 
accompanied by an udult 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 7 
1999 Summerfest Concert - Kulh (iordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrvmount Park. 7:00 p m - 900 

I m SILVER BULLET SWIN(i BAND Free 
Craft Prognun, Thomas Crane Public Library, 
\dams Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street 10:00 am - 

I I .30 am Ages 7 & older Registration is required 

FRIDAY, JULY 9 
Fanner's Market, F.very Friday through C)clt)ber 
29 John I^ncock Municipal Parking lot 1 1 30 a.m. 
5:00 pm 

New England Aquarium's Travdkig Tide Pool 
""ri July 9 Thomas Craiw Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, 9 30 am, 10 30 am, 
u\d 11:30 a.m. Children under 7 must be 
iccinnpanied bv an adult Registration is required. 

SAT., JULY 10 & SUN. JULY II 
IJth Annual Lipton Cup Regatta - Squantum 
Yacht Club. .luly 10 & 11. 

SUNDAY, JULY 11 
Birllulay of John Quincy Adaas and Anbtad 
ComncmoratkHi, 

Adams National Historical Park, Sunday, July II. 
12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Parkwide (617)770-1175. 
Free 

MONDAY, JULY 12 
How to Make Paper and Books. Thomas Crane 
Public Library. Adams Shore Branch, 519 Sea 
Street, Mon July 12, Wed. July 14 and Fn July 16, 
3:00 p.m. A three-part crafts program for ages 8 and 
older. Registration is required 

TUESDAY, JULY 13 
Storyteller Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, 7 00 pm Geoi|ie 
Capaccio. Ages 5 and older. 
Story Hour. Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, Tues , July 13, 700 
pm. Storyteller Dottie Moyiuhan will present a 
pajama time story hour for children under 5 
accompanied by an adult. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 14 
1999 Summerfest Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrvmount Park, 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 
pm. ROY SCOTT BIG BAND Frw 

THURS. JULY 15- SAT. JULY 17 
29TH Annual Qolncy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. Thursday, July 15 (10:00 a.m.- 8:30 p.m.). 
Friday, July 16 (10:00 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.), & Saturday, 
July 17 (10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.) Downtown becomes 
a pedestrian mall with goods, clothing, food and 
crafts for sale. Music and entertainment. Sponsored 
by the Quincy Center Business and Professional 
Association. (617)471-3232. 

THURSDAY. JULY 15 
Concerts on the Lawn - Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington Street 12:30 - 1:30 pm. 
Aubrey Atwater and Elwood Donnelly 
Arts hi the Parks. Wendall Moses Playground, 
Squantum. Entertainment, 6:30 p.ra - 8:00 p.m. 

FRIDAY, JULY li 
Farmer's Mariwt, Fri. July 16. Every Friday 
through October 29 John Hancock Municipal 
Parking lot. Quincy Center, across from the Court 
House. 11:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. For info, contact 
Quincv Farmen' Market Collaborative. (617)479- 
1601 

TUESDAY, JULY 2t 
Arts h the Parks. LaBrecque Field, Hou^ Neck 
Entertainment 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 pm Storytder 
Thomas Crane Public Library. Adams Shore Bnuioh, 
519 Sea Street, 7:00 pm Larky Hodges Ages 5 and 
older. 



Story Hour. Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, Tues, 7 00 pm 
Storyteller IX)ltie Moynihan will present a pujama 
lime story hour for (.hildren under 5 aocompaiued by 
an adult 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 21 
1999 Summerfest Concert - Ruth (iordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrvmount Park, 7 OO p m - 9 00 
pm THE CONTINHNTAI.S Free 

THURSDAY, JULY 22 
Concerts en the Lawn - lliomas Crane Public 
Library. 40 Washington Street 12 30 - I .30 pm 
Two of a Kind, David and Jenny Hcitlcr-Klevans 
Arts h the Parks, Adams Playground, Bradford 
Street, South Quincv Entertainment 
FRIDAY, JULY 23 
19 Year OM Bdbe Ruth State BaacbaU 
Tourn a ment, Adams Field, July 23 through July 30 
Farmer's Market Fndays thrtxigh October 29 
John Hancock Municipal Parking lot II 30 am - 
5:00 pm 

SUNDAY, JULY 25 
Antique Auto Show, Waterworks parking lot. 
Manna Bay, Quincy, Sunday, July 25, 10:(X1 a.m. - 
4:00 pm 

TUESDAY, JULY 27 
Arts h the Parks, Bishop Field, Montclair 
Entertainment, 6.30 pm- 8:00 pm 
Storyteller Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch. 519 Sea Street, 7 00 pm Ellen 
Block Ages 5 and older 

Stoi^ Hour Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, 7 00 pm Storyteller 
LX)ttie Moynihan -a pajama time story hour for 
chiklren under 5 accompanied by an adult 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28 
1999 Summerfest Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrymount Park 7:(X) p.m. - 9:(X) 
p m ROY NIJTILE BIG BAND Free 
Craft Program, Thomas Crane Pubic Library, 
Adams Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street. Wed July 28, 
10:00 a.m. Ages 7 and older Registration required 

THURSDAY, JULY 29 
Concerts on the Lawn • Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington Street, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 
Lucie Therrien 

Arts hi the Parks. O'Rourke Field, West Quincy 
Entertainment. 6:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 
FRIDAY, JULY 30 
Clayworks. Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch. 519 Sea Street, 10:30 am Ann 
McCrea. Ages 7-12. Registration required. 
Farmer's Maiket. Every Friday through October 
29. John Hancock Municipal Parking lot 1 1 :30 a.m. 
-5:00 pm 

SAT. JULY 31 & SUN. AUG 1 
Colonbl Encampment. Re-enactment of a Colonial 
camp with men and women in colonial costume. 
Tenting, colonial food. Squaw Rock. Sponsored by 
First Night Quincy. 

SATURDAY, JULY 31 
Back to the Beaches - Sat July 31, Wollaston 
Beach. 12:00 noon - 4:00 p.m. Family events, 
kayak demonstration. 12-2:00 Air Force Rock Band 
MDC. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 2 
Storyteller. Thomas Crane Public Library. 
Wollaston Branch. 41 Beale Street. 10:30 a.m. 
Carole DeCeglia will present "Storylelling with 
Little Miss Muffet" Best suited to ages 1-S. 
Registration is required 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3 
Arts hi the Parks. Beechwood Knoll .School, 
Wollaston. Entertainment. 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 
StoiyteBer. Thomas Crane Public Library. Adams 
Shore Branch. 519 Sea Street, 7:00 p.m. Guy 
Peartrce. Ages 5 aixl okler. 
Stoiy Ho«r. Thomas Crane Public Library, Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street. Tues.. 7:00 p.m. 
Dottie Moynihan will present a pajama time story 
hour for children under 5 accompanied by an adult. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4 
1999 S— mcrfwt Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Menymount Park 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 
pm. RAZZMATAZZ Free 



BcMflt fer the Salor's Home Cemetery 
RcalontiMi Pi^)ect. Wed. Aug 4. 7:00 p.m. - 11 :00 
p m. at the V.F. W. Bryan Post, 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 5 

Concerts on the Lawn - Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington Street, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 
New England folk singer, Jim Douglas. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 6 
Farmer's Market Every Friday through October 
29 .lohn Hancock Municipal Parking lot 1 1 30 am 
-500pm 

SAT. AUGUST 7 & SUN. AUGUST 8 
Boardwalk Art Show. Manna Bay Boardwalk, 
Quincy, Saturday, Augast 7 and Sunday, Augu.st X 
lOOOam. -60dpm 

TUESDAY, AUGUST It 
Storyteller lliomas Crane I'ublic Library . Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, 7 00 pm Jeanne 
IXmnalo Ages 5 and older 

Story Hour Thomas Crane Public Library , Adams 
Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street, 7 00 pm Dottie 
Moynihan - a pajama time story hour for children 
under 5 accompanied by an adult 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11 
1999 Summerfest Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrvmount I'ark, (,^incy 7:(K) 
pm -9 00pm REMINISCKNTS Free 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 12 
Craft Pragrun, Thomas Crane Public Library, 
Adams Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street 1 00 pm 
Ages 7 and older Registration required 

FRI. AUGUST 13- SAT. AUGUST 15 
Quincy Bay Race Week Regatta - all classes of one 
design boats; open entry Squantum Yacht Club 
August 13, 14. 15 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13 
Farmer's Market, Every Friday through fXitober 
29 John Hancock Municipal Parking lot 1 1 30 am 
-5:00p.m 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 15 
Remember the Ladies - Commemorating the 
significant contnbutions of some of Quincy's most 
historic women, area sites will cooperate to offei a 
full day of first person dramatic portrayals of these 
remarkable ladies Adams National Historical Park, 
Old House, 135 Adams Street, Quincy, and at The 
Quincy Homestead. 34 Butler Road, (617)770-1 175 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18 
1999 Summcrfeat Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Menymount Park. 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 
p m. JOHN PENNY BAND Free 
MedeUng Manin. Thomas Crane Public Library, 
Adams Shore Branch. 519 Sea Street, 10 30 am 
Preschoolers accompanied by an aduU. 
5* Annual Food Fest & Auction to benefit Father 
Bill's Place, 6:00-10:00 p.m.. Summer House. 
Marina Bay. Sponsored by the ()uincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2i 
Farmer's Market, Every Friday through October 
29. John Hancock Municipal Parking lot, 1 1:30 am 
-5:00pm 

MONDAY, AUGUST 23 
RegBtration bcgfau Thomas Crane Public Library, 
at all blanches 900 am Registration begins for 
Fall story times Programs offered on various days 
of the week for children from 4 mo. to 8 years. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 25 
Founder's Day - In celebration of the founding of 
the National Park Service, Adams National 
Historical Park. (Quincy. suspends the usual entrance 
fee Tours will be conducted paric-wide all day Free. 
1999 1999 Summerfest Concert - Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre in Merrymount Park, Quincy 7:00 
p.m. - 9 00 pm To be announced. Free. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 2« 
Craft Program, Thomas Crane Public Library. 
Adams Shore Branch, 519 Sea Street Thurs.. 1:00 
p m Ages 7 and older Registration is rec^red. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 27 
Farmer's Market. Every Friday through October 
29. John Hancock Municipal Parking lot. 11: 30 am. 
- 5:00 pm 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 29 
At^ut Moon FeatKaL Sunday, August 29. 3:00 - 
8:00 P.M. No. Quincy 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 
1999 Summerfest Concert (Last of the season) 
Ruth Gordon Amphitheatre in Merrymount Parte 
7:00 pm. - 9:00 p.m. THE ALUMNI BIG BAND. 
Free 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 
Farmer's Maiket. Every Friday through October 
29. John Hancock Municipal Puking lot. 11:30 a.m. 
- 5:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 
2nd Ammal QnfaKy Family Day. Fore River 
Shipyard. Quincy. Sunday, September 5 (rain date 
Moa. Sept. 6) 10:00 am - 10:00 p.m. Family 



oriented event including games, amusement rides, 
musical entertainment 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 
Victorian FestKal - Celebration of the Victonan 
Era Adams National llistoncal Park, (.^iincy Old 
House, 135 Adams Street For more inlormaliun and 
reservations, call (617)770-1 175 Free 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 
Farmer's Mariiet Every Enday through October 
29 John Hancock Municipal Parking lot II 30 a m 
-500pm 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 
Annual South Quincy ItaHan FestKal Malnati's 

Block, 1 1 00 am -8 00 pm 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 
Annual William F. Dcgan Memorial Road Race. 

Sunday, Sept 1 2 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 
Farmer's Market. E.very Enday through October 
29 John llanciKk Municipal Parking lot 1 1 30 am 
-5:(X)pm 

SAT. SEPT. 18 & SUN. SEPT. 19 
Quincy ArtsFest, Merrymount Park. Saturday, 
September 18, 10 00 am- 8 ()0 pm and Sunday, 
September 19, IO:(X) am - 3 00 pm Eamily- 
onented, autumn weekend of art, photographv , and 
live music and dance entertainment 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 
Constitution Day Celebration ln\ites the public to 
play a part in one of <Hir nation's greatest dramas, the 
passage of the United States Constitution by the 
Constitutional Convention, September 17, 1787 
Adams Natuxial Historical Park, Carnage House, 
135 Adams Sueet Free 

2" Annual Walk for the Marie A. Curry Fund, 
Sun Sept 19 sponsored by the Mayor's 
Commission on the Status of Women and the (,^incy 
Hospital Health & Education Foundation 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 11 
Cohmial Day Cekbratkm Columbus Day. All 
Day Adams National Historical Park Adams 
Birthplaces. 133 & 144 Franklin Street, Quincy 
Call (617)770-1 175 Reservations 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16 
FaU Family FestKal Traditional autumn 
festival. Food, Fun, Entertainment and a costume 
parade and contest for children in K-5 Saturday, 
October 16, from 10:00 am to 5:00 p.m. (Rain date 
Oct.23) Sponsored by the Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association (617)471-3232 Parte. 
Free 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27 
Haunted Ship - The USS Salem becomes a 
Haunted Ship Oct 27 - Oct 30 (Dates tenUtive) 6-9 

p.m. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29 
Spirits of Quincy's Past 6:00 pm , The Hancock 
Cemetery, Hancock Street, C^ncy and The United 
First Parish Church, 1306 Hancock Street 
Candlelight tour of one of New England's oldest 
burying grounds by Park rangers Adams National 
Histoncal Park. Free 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 
Birthday of John Adams, 12: 1 5 pm The United 
First Parish Church, 1306 Hancock Street 
Ceremony honoring the life and public service ot 
John Adams Adams National Histoncal Park 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2i 
U^tOug of the Qnfaicy Christmas Display at City 
Flail, Quincy Square. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27 
Santa's ArrKal hy Parachute Faxon Field. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28 
Quhicy's Anmrnl Christmas Parade, Sun , Nov 
28. 12:30 p.m. from School and Elm Sis to Hancock 
Street to North Quincy High School . East Squantum 
Street. 

SAT. DEC. 11 * SUN. DEC. 12 
The Adams Family: Home for the HoUdays Sat 
Dec. II & Sun Dec 12 11:00am -300pm,Okl 
House. 135 Adams Street Quncy Adams National 
Histoncal Park. Free. , 

FRTOAY, DECEMBER 31 
First Nl^ Qolncy, various sites in Quincy Center. 

For fivther infonnatioa. please call 

Events A Tourism, City of Quincy 

(617)376-1296 

1-888-ADAMSES 

or visit the website at: WWW.ci.quinCV.mau8 

Events and Tourism 
Calendar of Events 



Pagc3«A Tb* Qulnoy Sun Thanday, July 1, 1999 




Scenic Scenes 



HANCOCK CEMtTERYft 

Th f 
OLD BURfAL (S^UND 

SFT APART ,SaON;AfTr.R, 1640 



iiimlmwmmi^e^li 






'(i7of.'*i7'?^n: 



f*"^ 



I ■ an I 111 ail Mmut^0Bmtm^ 





HISTORIC FIRST PARISH Church, final rest- 
ing place of Presidents John and John Quincy 
Adams arid their wives, as seen from Constitu- 
tion Common across Hancock St. 

(Harr\; Brett photos/lmage Photo) 



BRONZE PUVQUE at entrance to Hancock Cem 
etery lists some of the early settlers buried there 




CONSTITUTION COMMON with its "Walk of 
Names" makes a picturesque and restful scene. 



Among them: Rev. John Hancock, father of the New City Hall, adjoining Old City Hall now 
patriot; Henry Adams, Josiah Quincy and Dr. named the James R. Mclntyre Government 
Leonard Hoar, third president of Harvard. Center, was built in 1978. 





We have a lot in common! 



Like the City of Quincy, South Shore Savings Bank has a history of 
commitment to excellence and to traditional New England values. You 
welcomed us to Quincy with open arms when we opened our Granite 
Crossing office in January, 1999. 




Today, we return your enthusiasm with a pledge to assume an active 
partnership role in preserving the City's past and promoting its future. 



South Shore 

SAVINGS BANK 

Granite Crossing • 370 Quincy Avenue • Quincy 
(800) 660-7800 



Abo offices in: East Bridgewater • East WeyrtXHrth • Hanovef/^k)^well 
North Weymouth • South Weymouth • Weymouth • Weymouth Landing 



Member rOIC'DIF 



THOMAS CRftH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

PO BOX 379 

WIMCY MA 02269 ^^ 

4€ 






Historic Quinci^'s Hometown VJeekly Newspaper 




VOL. 31 No. 41 



Thursday, July 8, 1999 



35c 



NEWS 

INSIDE 



ZBA Seeks Dept. 

Heads Comments 

On Highpoint 

^ Page 2 

▼ 

Quincy Still No. 1 

if Bush Elected 

~ Page 4 

▼ 

Lunchtime 

Concerts On 

Library Lawn 

~ Page 6 

▼ 

Rosemary 

Wahiberg 

Withdraws From 

Ward 1 Race 

~ Page 9 

▼ 

Council To Look 

At Health 

Center Offer 

— Page 10 

▼ 

Wollaston Manor 

Residents Meet 

Friday On 

Housing Issue 

~ Page 1 1 

▼ 

NQ's Larry Kelly 

Stanley Cup 

Champion 

" Paget? 



Weather 
Forecast 




I 



A GRAND OLD flag and a grand youngster, five-year-old Maggie Will, teamed as **Old 
dory" and won a lint prize in the Squantum Commanlty Association parade Monday. 
Other photos <» Page 8. (QuitKy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 



City Will Cooperate 

New Site 

Sought For 

Juvenile 

Court 

By MARILYN JACKSON 

The state's Division of Capital Asset Manage- 
ment again is seeking space to house a juvenile 
courthouse and related offices. 



■^ 



Accent On Stations And Services 

Gorman Cites Modern 
Needs For Fire Dept. 




e^aala^ 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

Fire Chief Thomas Gor- 
man had some sobering 
news for the City Council 
last week. 

Quincy needs to address 
the capital needs of the fire 
department and its ability to 
deliver services. 

"There's no question, 
Engine 5 Company is one of 
the busiest stations in the 
city," said Gorman. That 
station, located- at 182 
Q^land St., handles all the 
calls from the Crown Col- 
ony office park, which has 
expanded considerably dur- 
ing the past decade — and is 
still growing. 



The busiest station is the 
Central Fire Station, or En- 
gine 1, at 40 Quincy Ave- 
nue, but Engine 4, the Wol- 
laston station at 111 Beale 
St., is very active as well. 

Altogether, there are 
eight stations — Engine 2 at 
311 Hancock St., North 
Quincy; Engine 3 at 615 
Washington St., Quincy 
Point; Engine 6, at 1082 Sea 
St., Houghs Neck; Engine 7 
at 86 Huckins Ave., Squan- 
tum, and Engine 8 at 126 
Doane St., Germantown. 

"Over the next 10 years, 
the city will have to take a 
hard look at the locations 
[of the stations] and the 



buildings" themselves," said 
Go^an. 

..Many of the stations, he 
said, physically cannot ac- 
commodate the new fire 
apparatus which is being 
manufactured today. The 
stations were built before 
World War II of precast 
cement, almost like bunkers, 
and any modifications 
means "a major undertak- 
ing." 

"The stations were built 
in the horse-and-buggy 
days," Gorman told the 
councillors. Many of the 
engines are 20 years old, 
said the chief. 

(Cont'd on page 28) 



. The state wants to lease 
19,400 square feet of usable 
space in either Quincy, 
Braintree or Weymouth. 

Under the 1992 court 
reform bill, Juvenile Court 
was separated from the Trial 
Court. 

Last year, after the Ex- 
ecutive Office for Admini- 
stration and Finance issued 
a request for proposals, the 
state selected the former 
Grant's building at 152 
Parkingway, as the future 
site of a juvenile court- 
house. 

However, residents and 
officials alike objected to 
the proposal, citing the lack 
of parking and the proximity 
to senior housing as two 
principal reasons for not 
locating such a facility 
there. 

At the time. Mayor 
James Sheets said the pro- 
posal did not fit into the 



city's plans for the down- 
town business district 



Kthlttd S(()i\ 
On V.vm} 



Sheets said Tuesday he 
was pleased to see that the 
state had issued a new re- 
^ quest for proposals. Propos- 
es must be submitted to the 
Division of Capital Asset 
Management by 2 p.m. Aug. 
18. 

"Trying to locate [a ju- 
venile courthouse] on The 
Parkingway was not accept- 
able, and we had asked a 
number of times during the 
past six or seven month;^ 
that the state reopen the bid 
process. 

"We felt that that would 
be the fair way to do it," he 
said. 



Public Meeting July 15 
On New QHS Site Cleanup 



GEI Consultants Inc. will 
hold a public meeting at 7 
p.m. July 15 at the Roche 
Brothers Supermarket com- 
munity room, 101 Falls 
Blvd. to discuss the cleanup 
of land which has been 
designated as the site of the 
new comprehensive Quincy 
High School. 

In addition to a portion 
of the city-owned prq)erty, 
land belonging to Atlantic 
Develc^mient Corp. Also is 
slated for capping the land. 

GEI Consultants, a Win- 



chester-based environmental 
and civil engineering flrm, 
was hired by Bethlehem 
Steel Co. To determine what 
work needed to be done at 
the site. 

The former C.J. Partner- 
ship property is located at 
the rear of 221-227 Quincy 
Ave. and had used during 
World War II by Bethlehem 
Steel to dump asbestos 

when the Fore River Ship- 
yard was producing war- 
ships in record numbiers. 
Public Works Conmiis- 



sioner David Colton said 
GEI Consultants plans to 
recommend covering and 
capping the asbestos with 
clean material. 

"That's the appropriate 
way to deal with this con- 
tamination," said Colton. He 
said asbestos does not de- 
compose. It becomes a 
problem when it becomes 
air-borae, he said, adding 
that to his knowledge there 
have been no complaints of 
air-bome asbestos. 

Last May, the site was 



designated as a "public in- 
volvement plan site, after a 
petition from nearly two 
dozen residents asked to 
participate in the decisions 
regarding the remedial ac- 
tion for the site. 

Copies of the proposed 
remedial action will be dis- 
tributed at Hie meeting. For 
further information about 
the meetings residents may 
write to Anne Leifer, assis- 
tant project manager at GEI 
Consultants, 1021 Main St., 
Winchester 01890 or call 
her at (781) 721-4000. 




COOLING OFF - The temperature was fai the high 90's 
Monday and a sprinkler came in handy at Baker Beach, 
Germantown Joly 4th activities for Donna Kramer and 
Antunm, 3, and Nathan, 8 months. 

(QimcySimPhotoltomGonmm) 



1^2 TlMQuiaosrSua Thunday, July 8, 1999 




Zoning Appeals Board 

Seeks Dept. Heads' 
Highpoint Comments 



STOP & SHOP Companies CEO BUI Grize gives a ''thumbs 
up" for the Jimmy Fund as he is about to get a dunldng at a 
recent fkindraising barbecue on Quincy Center Plaza in front 
of Stop & Shop Companies headquarters. 



The Zoning Board of 
Appeals has asked all city 
department heads to submit 
comments on the new High- 
point apartment complex 
proposal by Aug. 1. 

Developer Dean Stra- 
touly, president of Congress 
Group Ventures, filed a new 
housing plan for his 75-acre 
Quarry Street site for 1,641 
apartments and seeking a 
comprehensive permit from 
the Zoning Board. Under 
this plaii, 25 percent of the 
apartments would have to be 
set aside for affordable 
housing. If Stratouly were 
granted permission to con- 
struct all the units as pro- 
posed, that would mean 
dedicating up to 410 apart- 
ments for affordable hous- 
ing. 

Much of the material 
requested of the department 



of public works, the plan- 
ning department and the 
health department is data 
presented previously to the 
city council, which sat as 
the special permit granting 
authority when it reviewed 
Congress Group Ventures' 
first proposals. 

After several hearings 
and discussions, the council 
voted 7 to 1 to deny Con- 
gress Group Ventures' ap- 
plication. 

The developer has ap- 
pealed the decision. 

Meanwhile, Stratouly has 
lined up financing for the 
project but fiTst must secure 
numerous permits and ap- 
provals. 

Thirteen years ago the 
site had been approved for 
an affordable housing de- 
velopment under a compre- 
hensive permit but the proj- 
ect did not go forward. 



The Samoset Pharmacy Tradition 
is not dead, it is alive and well at... 




in North Quincy I 
475 Hancock Street! 



SUNDAY BOSTON 
GLOBES & HERALDS 

$1.50 

Price Valid at this Osco Drug location only, until at least 8/1/99! 







SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

5 for $6 

• 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 
• 1 gallon of West Lynn Milk (1%, 2% or fat free) • Best Buy 
English Muffins • Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid xohUe supplies last, one special per coupon. Vie reserve the right to limit quantities. Price increase due to our increased milk cost. 
\^ _^ Vg/trf SMnrfgy7/Il/^OH^ \^^lyat^5Jiat^ck Street, North Quincy location. 

Your Osco in North Quincy, 

* 

A Big Store Carrying 
On a ''Naborhood'' Tradition. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted 

(Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat Sam-noon) 



During the 1970s, another 
developer had obtained 

permits to build a 2,500-unit 
complex. 

During the past year, 
residents objected to the 
density and the size of the 
proposed development. 

The new design calls for 
constructing 15 eight-story 
buildings which would 
contain the mixed-income 
apartments and preserving 
more than 50 acres, about 



two-thirds of the site, as 
open space. 

Recreation facilities 
would include a swimming 
pool, tennis courts, exercise 
rooms and a meeting space 
for the residents. 

The new Highpoint ap- 
plication calls for con- 
structing 20 percent of the 
development as three- 
bedroom units, 40 percent 
as two-bedroom units and 
40 percent as one-bedroom 
units. 



D'Amico Schedules 
Neighborhood Forums 



Ward 4 Councillor Mi- 
chael D'Amico has sched- 
uled two neighborhood fo- 
rums in the coming weeks 
to provide residents with an 
update of ongoing issues. 

At 6:30 p.m. July 15, at 
the Ward 4 Community 
Center, 100 Brooks Ave., 
Public Works Commis- 
sioner David Colton and a 
representative from Quarry 
Hills Development will dis- 
cuss the West Quincy golf 
course. A timetable as well 
as mitigation efforts to 
minimize the impact of the 
project will be detailed. 
And, a model of the 27-hole 
course will be on display. 

In addition, Norfolk 
County District Attorney 
William Keating, Police 
Chief Thomas Frane and 
members of the Safe Quar- 
ries Advisory Committee 
will attend this meeting to 
provide a status report on 
the quarries. 

D'Amico said the com- 
mittee was formed last year 
as a way to encourage con- 
cerned parents of teenagers 
to become involved in pre- 



ventive efforts to avoid 
tragedy. 

On July 21 at 6:30 p.m. 
at the conununity center, the 
Ward 4 crime watch cook- 
out will be held. D'Amico 
has invited Traffic Engineer 
Jack Gillon to discuss a 
master plan for South 
Quincy traffic. Also, some 
of the city's community 
officers who serve in South 
Quincy and West Quincy 
will be on hand to demon- 
strate law enforcement's 
latest technology in use to- 
day, i 

A live band will entertain 
during the evening. 

D'Amico reminded resi- 
dents of two summertime 
concerts as well. 

Dave Burbank and the 
Emanons will perform at 
6:30 p.m. July 27 at the 
Granite Workers Memorial 
at Shea Park. Rain date is 
July 28. 

And, the fourth annual 
Arts in the Parks musical 
extravaganza, featuring a 
swing band, will be held at 
6:30 p.m. July 29 at 
O'Rourke Park. 




by Tony Centorino, Ksvin McGroarty and Bill StarkI* 

SMELUNGARAt? 

Recently, the National Institute For most of your car's malnte- 
for Automotive Service Excellence nance needs, rely on our ASECer- 
surveyed over 16,000 automotive tifled technicians at LEO & WALTS 
techrNdansabouttheirexpenences. SUNCXX}.WeusetheAIIOataCO- 
One of the more curious tklbJts of ROM based system for the very lat- 
Wormalfon to emerge from ttwsur- est in maJntenvice and service bul- 
vey was that snakes, rodents, and letins for al makes of cars. Learn fbr 
other animals are responsUe tor yourselfwhysomanyofyourfrjends 
morecarprobiemsthantheaverage wA neighbors turn to us to keep 
personwouUeverimagine.Whe(her theirfamjly cars in top condition. For 
rodents nesting underthehood were the best service in town, we're here 
responsibleformysieriouselectrical at 258 Quincy Ave.. E. Braintree 
malfiinctkjns or mice hoarding food (781-843-1550). Sunoco and most 
inside tail pipes prevented vehcles rra^ credit cards honored. We are 
fromrunning,animalswerefoundto 'A Place Where Your C» Can Live 
beatworfconvulnersd)iea(4omoljve Longer.' 
syjerre. One 0* the most common HINT: Ne&fy three-quatan of 
profaleinsinvofvesshortedwiringckje the auto technicians suveyed by 
to nfebing of wire casings. WHh this theNationallnstituleforAutomolive 
in mind, car owners may •*«« to Service Excetence said thai over 
garage their cars rather than leave haKoflheveNdestheyworkonm 
them parked outskle. poorly m^ntHned. 

Propmb By 7k£ Porno 

No flat rate, you ^ what you pay fori 

(Leo & Waif s Sunoco ABK Propane. Inc.) 



^ 

^^^ 



Leo a Wrt'i Su noco 

(781) 843-1550 



I 



Tliunday,Jiily8,1999 Tli« Qulaoy Sun PigeS 



^Drug Court' Planned 
At Quincy Court 



The U.S. Justice 6e- 
partment has awarded a 
$17,400 planning grant to 
Quincy District Court to 
establish a special "drug 
court" for less serious drug 
crimes. 

Judge Charles Black, the 
presiding justice at Quincy 
District Court, and Norfolk 
County District Attorney 
William Keating jointly 
applied for the grant. 

The new program could 
begin by late next year or in 
early 2001. The state's share 
of the cost will be a percent- 
age of Judge Black's time 
that he will spend to help 
develop the program. The 
grant will cover any travel, 
training and/or administra- 
tion costs. 

"National studies have 
shown that special 'drug 
court' sessions can dramati- 
cally cut the recidivism rate 
for low-level drug crimes," 
said Keating. 

"Some courts have seen 



three-year recidivism rates 
down from 40 to 45 percent 
down to 28 percent and 
even as low as 5 percent in 
some jurisdictions," he said. 

Judge Black said he was 
"thrilled for this new op- 
portunity to address the is- 
sue of substance abuse, 
which is so prevalent among 
the defendants who a|^ar 
in Quincy District Court." 

In 1996, the court han- 
dled 1,071 cases involving 
controlled substances, and 
in 1997, the most recent 
year for which statistics 
were available, that number 
increased to 1,331 

In addition to being more 
effective in preventing re- 
peat offenses, the intense 
intervention that comes with 
the drug court program is 
also more cost effective. 

"The cost of the in- 
creased treatment, supervi- 
sion and support given de- 
fendants through drug court 



New Site Sought 
For Juvenile Court 



(Cont'd from pagf I) 

Another location sug- 
gested at the time was a 
building on Broad Street, 
opposite the George F. 
Bryan VFW Post, said the 
mayor. 

"There may be other sites 

in Quincy as well," he said. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



WED&THURS JULY7&8 

orandan rnssr • nacnm ntaz 

THE MUMMY' (PQ-13) 

A(MtSchFI 

EVES 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 9 

Sttn Conmy • CtlhtrinB Z'JonBS 

'ENTRAPMENT (PQ.13) 

AduKThrHler 

FRI & SAT 7:00 & 9:15 

SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



AU SSATS 350 



"We're not obstruction- 
ist," continued Sheets. 

"Quincy will work to 
find an appropriate location. 
The juvenile court has to be 
in the right location for eve- 
ryone," She^ said. 



P ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW&OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line of Supplies 
Fne Estimates 



programs is actually more 
than offset by the savings 
realized by not putting them 
in jail," Keating continued. 

The U.S. Justice De- 
partment last year released a 
report estimating a net sav- 
ings of $5,000 per defendant 
who goes through the drug 
court program rather than 
serving a jail sentence for 
his or her crime. 

The drug court will con- 
vene weekly in the Quincy 
District Court building on 
chestnut Street. Specially 
trained prosecutors, along 
with the presiding justice 
and Chief Probation Offlcer 
Michael Walsh wUl use the 
drug court to place drug 
addicts accused on non- 
violent crimes into long- 
term treatment and recidi- 
vism prevention programs 
<tesigned to break their ad- 

"Drug courts use the 
threat of incarceration as 
leverage to disrupt the cycle 
of addiction, said the district 
attorney, adding that 
"addiction is an illness that 
proper treatment can arrest 
[but] incarceration alone 
only delays." 




THE CITY ACCEPTS a bkyde to Its community pottdng prognm by lOW Soothcra Artery 
fkom Paul Bahariaa, executive -dirvctor, and Lucy Parlcc, activitiefl director. From kfl, 
Quincy Point Officer James Dcntrenont, Quincy Polnt/Gennantown S«t. Brian Tobin, 
BaliariaB, Parlcc, Lt William Stcnmoo, WoUaston/North Quincy Sgt Joiu Ryan and Quincy 
Point Officer Christine KrauBclis. Second biltt In picture was donated by tlic Mass. 
Cooperative BaniL 

Berry St. Now Residence B Zone 



The City Council last 
week approved a zoning 
change in Ward 2 which 
turned both sides of Berry 
Street, off Quincy Avenue, 
from a Business B zone to a 
Residence B zone. 

Two lots on the north- 
easterly side of Quincy 
Avenue, were excluded 
from the original rezoning 
proposal and remain in the 
business district. 



City councillors Timothy 
Cahill and Stephen Durkin 
recused themselves from 
voting on the matter. 

In early May, attorney 
Lawrence DiNardo told the 
councillors he supported 
rezoning the property along 
Berry Street but opposed 
changing 48-50 Quincy 
Ave. to Residence B be- 
cause the rest of Quincy 
Avenue, from Elm Street to 



Scannell Street, already 
consists of businesses. 

In addition, his client had • 
executed a purchase-and- 
sale agreement to sell the 
property to Anthony Falco, 
a Quincy attorney, who 
wants to move his office 
with five lawyers to the new 
site. 

Falco still needs a vari- 
ance from the Zoning Board 
of Appeals . 




Neponset 
Pet Center & 
Animal Hospital 



' FtfffServto VeleriiMUY Hospital 
• ffaf Snomlug • fsf Tnlalng 
fet Boarding • Ml Pal Supplhs 

$17 VETERINARY VISIT 

oii^rwill flMfMi^ nphm 7/31/99 



And you get the gifts! 

OPEN A FIRST CHOICE CHECKING ACCOUNT 
AND GET YOUR CHOICE OF 



$3.00 OFF 



Any Grooming, Veterinaiy or Boarding Sorvice 

7wm 



$2.00 OFF 

AnyPMSuppliosfi 



$1SJI| 



961 MORHSSEY BLVD^ DORCHESTER 
(teMQMKrM 4I7-2SS-2333 






Koozic Six-Pack 




OR 




Tote Bag 



ALONG WITH THESE BENEFITS 



No minimum balance 

Free first order of 50 checks 

No monthly service charge 

No charge for check processing 

Free onsite ATM access ' . * 

Free ATM access at SUM® and COOP'*" terminals 

Overdraft protection 

Direct Deposit 

JOIN US JULY 19 THROUGH 24 FOR 
FOOD & GIFTS 



62ClayStrwt 
Quincy, MA 02170 
617.786,0251 



BRIDGEWATER ... 

CREDIT UNION www.trtdgewatercu,ctnH 

*Gift> avaibbk durii^ the promocional period and (Mtly at ifae WoUaston Office. 

Membership requited. 




Page 4 Tim Quiney Bun TTmrKJay. July 8, 199» 



Opinion 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The QuJncy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1 372 Hancock St. , Quincy, MA 021 69 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35< per copy. $15.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$1 7.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $20.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage pakl at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

Th« Quincy Sun aMuniM no fWwndai rMponsibWy tor typographical arrort In 
MhwrtlMrncntt but wW raprlni tt« part of an ac^artlMmarrt in \wttKh ttM typographical 
arror occurs. 



President's Wreath 

To Honor 

John Q. Adams 



A wreath from the White 
House will be placed on the 
tomb of President John 
Quincy Adams in a cere- 
mony at United First Parish 
Church (Unitarian Univer- 
salist), also known as 
"Church of the Presidents", 
1306 Hancock Street, 
Quincy CenfTer, on Sunday, 
July 11, at noon. 

The wreath-laying cere- 
mony marks the 232nd 
birthdate anniversary of the 
sixth President of the United 
States who was bom on July 
11, 1767. 

Commander Charles D. 
Wiseman, Naval Reserve 



Center Quincy, will present 
the wreath on behalf of 
President Clinton, along 
with a Navy Color Guard. 

Mayor James A. Sheets, 
Adams Temple and School 

Fund Administrator and 
City Councillor Paul Har- 
old, and John Stanwich, 
Park Ranger for the Adams 
National Historical Park 
will give remarks. 

A tour of the church and 
crypt will be offered fol- 
lowing the ceremony. The 
public is invited and admis- 
sion is free. For more in- 
formation, call 773-0062. 




THE HISTORY CHANNEL 

On July 6, 1777, Major General John Burgoyne, along 
with a force of 8,000 from Canada, captured Ft. 
Ticonderoga in upstate New York ... July 11, 1804, Vice 
President Aaron Burr shot Alexander Hamilton in a duel in 
Weehawkcn, N.J. . . . July 7, 1862, the Land Grant Act was 
approved, providing for public land sale to benefit agricul- 
tural education; this eventually led to the establishment of 
state university systems . . . July 7, 1865, four co-conspira- 
tors in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln were hanged 
... July 6, 1892, a strike at the Carnegie steel mills in 
Homestead, Pa., resulted in the deaths of seven guards, 1 1 
strikers, and some spectators ... July 7, 1898, the annexa- 
tion of Hawaii was signed by President William McKinley 
. . . July 7, 1941, the U.S. occupied Iceland . . . July 9, 1943, 
the U.S. and Britain invaded Sicily ... July 8, 1969, U.S. 
forces began withdrawing from Vietnam . . . July 11, 1995, 
the U.S. announced that it was re-establishing diplomatic 
relations with Vietnam ... July 8, 1997, the Senate 
Governmental Affairs Committee began hearings into 
potentially illegal fund-raising practices related to tlic 1994 
and 1996 elections ... July 7, 1998, a three-judge panel of 
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia 
upheld a ruling in May by U.S. District Judge Norma 
Holloway Johnson that Secret Service agents may be 
required to testify before Independent Counsel Kenneth 
Starr's grand jury looking into the Monica Lewinsky mat- 
ter ... July 8, 1998, a tentative settlement was reported 
between Dow Coming Corp. and lawyers for 170,000 
women who claimed they had become ill from the compa- 
ny's silicone breast implants . . . July 8, 1998, four leaders 
of the Montana Freemen were convicted in U.S. District 
Court in Billings, Mont., of conspiring to defraud four 
banks ... July 9, 1998. the Senate passed a bill to reform 
the way the Internal Revenue Service operates, creating a 
nine-member oversight board. 

O 1999 King Features Synd . Inc. 





Santeams 



By Henry Bosworth 



Quincy Will Still Be No. 1 




GEORGE W. 
BUSH 



NO reason for Quincy to be concerned over its 
unique place in history if Texas Gov. George 
W. Bush is elected president. 

Bush, of course, would create a tie in the father-son 
presidential honors department. 

It would mean two sets of father- son presidents: our 
own John Adams 
and John Quincy 
Adams. And, 
George W.H. Bush 
and George W. 
Bush. 

But Quincy 
would still hold 
onto the un- 
matched honor of 
being the birth- 
place not only of 
two presidents, but 
father-son presidents. GEORGE W.H. BUSH 

Former President Bush was born in neighboring 
Milton June 12, 1924. George W. was bom in New 
Haven, Conn. July 6, 1946. 

John Adams (Oct. 19, 1735) and John Quincy 
Adams (July 11, 1767) were not only born here in 
Quincy in side-by-side cottages but grew up here and 
lived here all their lives except for the times they were 
off serving their country in Washington, D.C. and over- 
seas. 

And, of course, they are now forever here, entombed 
with their wives side-by-side in the crypt in United 
First Parish Church in Quincy Sq. 

Former President Bush was born in a 15-room Vic- 
torian house at 173 Adams St., Milton, just down the 
street a way from the Adams Mansion on Adams St., 
Quincy, which served as a summer White House for 
the two presidents and where four generations of that 
illustrious family lived. 

Bush lived in Milton only six months and has paid 
little attention to his birthplace. 

But, he was on hand Aug. 12, 1997 when Milton 
dedicated a plaque on a granite stone to mark the house 
as his birthplace. 

During the brief visit, he toured the home with 
present owners Dean and Nina Graves and peeked into 
the second floor room where he was bom. 

He later candidly acknowledged to the estimated 
1,000 attending the dedication that he had no memo- 
ries about living there. 

But, he noted with pride and a smile: 

"1 was potty trained in six months, however, right 
here in this house. It's a remarkable historical fact that 




will live on forever." 

Unlike the Adams roots which are still deep in 
Quincy, the Bush roots were transplanted to Connecti- 
cut and then to Texas where the former president be- 
came a millionaire oilman and rose to political star- 
dom. 

And, from where, George W. hopes to follow his 
father's footsteps to the White House. 

George W., the present Republican frontrunner, may 
be elected president in 2,000. Or, later. 

But Quincy will still have the distinction of being 
the only birthplace of a father and son who became 
president of the United States. 

And, that honor could stand through the next mil- 
lennium. And the one after that. 

And, just maybe forever. • 

Q 

YOU MIGHT SAY the safest plac e for an incum- 
bent ward councillor is Ward 1. 

At least it has been for close to 79 
years. 

Frank McCauley, former mayor 
and present councillor-at-large, 
passes along that little election tid- 
bit. McCAULEY 

McCauley is writing "A Political History of Quincy** 
to be published as part of the city's millennium. 

He notes that the present Plan A form of city gov- 
emment with ward councillors went into effect in 1920. 

And, his research shows that since then, no Ward 1 
incumbent councillor has ever been defeated for re- 
election. 

"And," McCauley says, "Ward 1 is the only ward 
with that distinction.** 

Four of those Ward 1 councillors became mayor: 
Perley Barbour, Tom Burgin, David Mcintosh and 
McCauley. 

William Jenness and Charles Shea went on to be- 
come state representatives. 

Other well known Ward 1 councillors include: David 
Crowley, Leo Kelly (re-elected five times), Edward 
Graham, Michael Cheney and present incumbent Pe- 
ter Kolson. 

Kolson was re-elected four times but this year won't 
be charged with trying to keep the incumbent win streak 
intact. He's running for a council at-large seat instead. 

Question: will the next Ward 1 incumbent keep it 
going? 

□ 
THE FIRST SCHOOL Committee challenger has 
stepped forward. William Donovan, 30, of Hamden 
Circle, Wollaston, has taken out nomination papers. 



Ri: ADiKs Fori \i 



Don't Cancel The Parade, 
Change Memorial Day Back To May 30 



Editor, The Quinq/ Sun: 
Tb answer Leonard F. 

Morris, No Way!!! 

As parade chairman for 



We need you« 



The most popular name given to boats registered in 
the United States is Odyssey, according to the Boat 
Owners Association of the United States. 



American Heart 
AssodatiooJ 

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR UFE 







both Memorial Day and 
Veteran's Day, I am 
discouraged and 

disappointed with the 
number who line the 
parade route, but I am 
thankful for those who do 
take the time to line the 
parade route and join with 
us at Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery for our service. 

Back in 1868 General 
Logan, commander-in- 
chief of the Grand Army of 



the Republic designated 
May 30 as a day to 
decorate graves of 
departed comrades of the 
Civil War, but was later 
expanded to honor those 
who gave their lives in all 
wars. Canceling Memorial 
Day is to forget the 
sacrifices made by 
veterans. 

Why should Veteran's 
Day t^ the only day to 
have a parade, if people 



will not come out to watch 
a parade in warm weather, 
they will not come out in 
cold. 

What needs to be done 
is to change Memorial 
Day back to May 30 and 
not as a three day 
weekend, the unofficial 
start to summer. 

Thomas Stansbury 

Parade Chairman 

Quincy Veterans' Council 



Tlwirid«y,Jiily8,lf» Tbum Qvdaaaj BtMXk Pa|c5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS A 1909 postcard view of the then brand new 
nicely landscaped Coddington Sdiool on Coddington 
Street In Quincy Street Renamed Coddington HaU, it 
is now one of th« main campus cmnponents of Quincy 
College. Unfortunately, thov^ some years ago the 
landscaped area in the for^round was converted into 



an unsi^tly parking lot But that could soon change. 
Lincoln Properties the new developers of the old court- 
house lot next door have proposed citensi ve landscap- 
faig along CoddingtCHi Street The latest pbins would 
eliminate the paridng lot and bring back a more cam- 
pus-like setting like this. 

From the Collection of Tom GaJvin 



- July 8 - 14 

1950 
49 Years Ago 



Rl ADI RS l\)Ul M 



Honoring The Papile Family 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

In the Feb. 4, 1999 edi- 
tion of The Quincy Sun, 
there was an outstanding 
article in the Sunbeams col- 
umn by Henry Bosworth. 

Julie Pi^ile McCormack, 
Jim Papile's daughter, had 
spoken with him regarding 
the Rafhel and Lucia Pq)ile 
family. 

I am in full agreement 
with the recommendation 
that at the World War II 
memorial dedication there 
be extra well deserved rec- 
ognition for the bravery, 
honor, and patriotism of 
veterans Mike, Bill, Al, Leo, 
Jim, Ralph and George 
Papile for their dedicated 
military service during 
WoridWarn. 

Tribute should also be 
given to Alphonse, Mary, 
Sadie, Ned, Johnny, Millie, 
Helen, and Gloria Papile 
who served in different ca- 



pacities on the home front. 

Several members of the 
World War II Memorial 
conmiittee have agreed that 
such recognition will be in 
place at the time of the me- 
morial dedication. 

If I were to suggest role 
model parents along with 
my own mother and father it 
would definitely be Raffael 
and Lucia Papile. They were 
loving, caring, understand- 
ing, considerate parents. 

Mr. Papile was a hard 
working provider at a time 
when it was very difficult to 
care for your fomily during 
the depression and recession 
years. He was a kind, gentle, 
man who loved his family 
and always helped people in 
need. A "real family man". 

Mrs. P^ile was a saintly 
woman who had a tremen- 
dous amount of faith. She 
had love for her family and 
anyone she touched. They 



were ideal parents that 
should have been revered by 
all parents. 

In addition to the World 
War II memorial dedication 
I would like to see the entire 
family recognized for their 
achievements, contributions 
and dedication to the neigh- 
borhood, community, city, 
state and country. 

I would suggest first - 
changing the name of 
Harkins St. to "Papile 
Lane". 

Second, a placque be 
placed in the auditorium of 
the Point-Webster Middle 
School where many of the 

Papile family performed, 
served and participated in 
different functions. Third, a 
placque be placed in the 
school playground where 
many hours were ^nt by 
the Papile family. I believe 
these are suggestions that 
can be achieved without a 



problem. 

I can certainly attest to 
the achievements, accom- 
plishments, patriotism, 
dedication by the Raffael 
and Lucia Papile family 
because I was their neighbor 
and have been a very dose 
friend all of my life. I 
played, prayed, cried, and 
laughed with them through 
good times and sad times. 

The Pettinelli and Papile 
families have been and still 
are very friendly. 

I know of no other fam- 
ily more deserving of such 
tributes and recognition for 
their contributions to society 
than the Raffael & Lucia 
Papile family. 

I deem it a privilege and 
honor to have been affiliated 
with and a part of the Papile 
family's lives. 

Guido "Budsy" PettineUi 
HardwickRd. 



Su^ests JFK Health Center 
As Site For New Fire Station 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

At the City Council 
meeting of June 28, 1999, 
Fire Chief Th(Hnas Gorman 
spoke of the need of a new 
Fire Station in the very near 
future. He said that most of 
the fire stati(His were built at 
a time when fire trucks were 
much smaller with much 
less equipment Now, as we 
r^)idly approach the year 
2000, we must think of the 
future needs (tf our Fire De- 
partment 

I am reonnmending that 
the city-owned property at 
1120 Hancock Street which 
is the John F. Kennedy 
Health Center which was 
dedared as "available for 
di^XMition" on Dec. 21, 
1998 be set aside at a site 
for a new Hre Station. Ion 
rec omn w a iding that Plot 35* 



Plan 1126-1120 Hancock 
Street, 24,535 sq. ft. be 
taken off the market and the 
proposed sale to Global 

NAPS, a teleconununication 
company, for $550,000 be 
withdrawn on August 2, 
1999 City Council meeting, 
and this site be nude avail- 
able for a new Fire Station 
to be built in the near future. 



This site at 1120 Han- 
codc Street, is easily acces- 
sible to the downtown and 

existing 10-story business 
and apartment buildings 
where large ladder trucks 
are needed. The street width 
is wide enough to accom- 
modate fire trucks in and 
out of a station. As you 
know, available land is 



scarce in Quincy, especially 
in the downtown area, and 
the purchase price of a 
comparable space would be 
a far greater cost to the tax- 
payers, that the $550,000 
bid from Global NAPS, for 
the sale of this valuable 
piece of city-owned prop- 
erty. 

Arline Goodman 
Revere Rd. 



Health Insurance For 
Seniors Discussion July 12 



M^icare and other health 
insurance coverage. For 
more information or to 



Jane Mudge the regional Sqnantnm Gardens Com- 

(SHINE) coordinator will munity Center. 
prMent an informational Shine counselors help 

session on Medicare and elders and Medicare benefi- 

supplementary . insurance claries understand their 2* * "**7,***^' *^ 

July 12 at 12:30 pm at the rights and benefits under **^ *"** •^ 376-1243. 



Quincy^s 
Yesterdays 

Gilkerson Urges 
Suit Against Pollution 

By PAUL HAROLD 

Rep. Avery Gilkerson urged City Manager William 
Deegan to file suit against Boston as a way to end pollution 

in the bay. mi nwiiiuiii 

"We have a new adminis- 
tration in Boston now (Mayor 
Hynes) and 1 think we should 
go forward on this plan which 
1 advocated for several years," 
he said. 

Deegan said he would confer with city solicitor Arthur 
Burgess on the lawsuit as a way to abate pollution. 
KOREAN WAR COULD BOOST SHIPBUILDING 
Following a meeting in Washington, Alexander Purdon, 
executive secretary of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce, 
said that the Korean situation could help boost shipbuilding 
and ship repair work. 

He noted that the long-range projections for the merchant 
marine building program were pessimistic, but that $25 
million was being readied in recondition 134 moth bailed 
ships. All that work would be done in private yards. 
QUINCY SCOUT AWARDED EAGLE 
BY NATIONAL BOY SCOUTS HEAD 
Fifteen year-old Quincy Boy Scout, Richard Moore of the 
Wollaston Methodist troop, was presented his Eagle award 
by the national head of the Boy Scouts of America, Dr. 
Arthur Schuck. 

Moore was presented his Eagle in ceremonies at Valley 
Forge, Pennsylvania where he was participating in the recent 
Jamboree. It was the first time in the 31-year history of the 
Quincy Council of Boy Scouts that a scout was so honored 
by the Chief Scout. 

Moore was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Denzil Moore of Pine 
St. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Rep. Charles Hedges announced his intention to seek the 
GOP nomination for state senator. . . Frederick Holmstrom 
reported seeing a saucer shaped lighted disk over Cranch 
Hill at 11:45 p.m., traveling at 400 mph. . . Rev. Kenneth 
Batchelder of the Houghs Neck Gospel Chapel said that 10 
tent meetings would be held at the intersection of Sea St. and 
Sea Ave., from July 17-July 29. . . Sixteen reserve pilots at 
the Squantum Naval Air station requested carrier duty '^ 
Korea. . . A son was bom at Quincy City Hospital to Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Benzaquin of Clay St. A daughter was bom to Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Deveau of Pond St. . . Mike Grossman was 
the outgoing president of the Jaycees. . . Dennis Ryan was 
advocate at the North Quincy Kof C. . . Quincy High School 
Class of 1890 held a reunion at the South Amherst home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miller. . . The Quincy Health Center, 
the second in the nation to be built with^federal funds, was 
targeted for completion by the first of 1951. . . Ralph Ames 
was a winner in the age group 9-10, in the postponed 
Squantum July Fourth athletic games. . . Rev. Charles Wing 
of the First Parish Church conducted the funeral of Mrs. 
Thomas Lacey , the city's oldest social and charitable worker. 
She was the former president of the Family Welfare Society, 
renamed Family Services in 1948. . . Quincy businessman 
Charles Scammell died at his home at 54 S<^mell St. He 
was the owner of S. Scammell and Sons on Quincy Ave., 
founded by his father, Simec^, 75 years ago as a carriage 
shop. . . Atty. Melvin Thomer, Moses Karp, Quincy Center 
druggist and Chester Johnson, owner of Johnson's Filling 
Station in Wollaston, gave their biographies at the Kiwanis 
Club meeting at the Cliveden Building. . . Robert Blair was 
vice president of the Granite Trust . . The monthly waste 
paper collection by the Quincy Federation of Women's 
Oiganizations benefited in the auditorium fund of the "Y- 
That-ls-Yet-To-Be." . . . Steriing Hayden was starring in 
"Asi^ait Jungle" at the Strand. . . Rev. Eugene Maguire, 
pastor of the Most Blessed Saoament Church, announced 
plans for the annual "Tombola." . . . Gilding Inspector 
Alrick Weidnum noted a boom in single fiunily home con- 
struction with the issuance of 45 permits ui May and 36 
permits in June. . . Quincy's Jinuny Soolt was the most 
promising wrestler at UMaryland. . . Jordan Marsh opened 
an appliance and TV store at 84-86 Washiagjton St . . The 
Coletti Brothers were architects for the new school on F^nno 
St .. The Squantum Yacht Oub auxiliary held their annual 
trophy dance. .. Arthur Burgess said he was not a candidate 
for the GOP hominatioo for state senator. 



Page6 TlM Quisioy Sua Thunday, July 8, 1999 



John, Abigail Adams 

Personal Items On Display 

At Historical Society 



Lunchtime Concerts At 
Crane Library Begin July 15 



The Quincy Historical 
Society is presenting a 
special display of items 
from its collection 
believed to have belonged 
, to John and Abigail 
Adams, John Hancock, 
and others from the 
generation of the 
American Revolution. 

In nearly all instances 
these are articles of 
clothing and other personal 
items. Many arc artifacts 



that were collected in the 
earliest years of the 
Historical Society's 
existence. Some arrived 
via routes that provide a 
direct connection to their 
famous owners; others 

passed through intervening 
families. 

Each item evokes a 
sense of the personalities 
and life in the formative 
years of our country, and 
each tells something of the 
lore that grew up in 



Quincy over generations 
about the community's 
illustrious figures. 

Some items have not 
been on public display in 
Quincy for a considerable 
time. Among these are the 
waistcoat John Adams is 
said to have worn at his 
wedding and a set of stays 
that reportedly belonged to 
Abigail Adams. 

The display is on 
exhibit through Aug. 13. 



Summer Playground 
Program Underway 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department playground 
program is now underway. 

The department super- 
vises playgrounds Monday 
through Friday, 830 a.m. to 
1:30 p.m. during July and 
August. 

Supervised activities are 
for Quincy residents age six 
through 16 and include 
games and sports for indi- 
viduals and teams, arts and 
crafts, as well as a variety of 
special evqnts, including 
field trips. 



Team games are con- 
ducted in basketball and 
baseball for boys, midgets 
ages 8-9, juniors ages 10-12, 
and seniors ages 13-16, and 
girls two divisions, ages 8- 
12 for juniors and ages 13- 
16 for seniors. Playground 
specialists visit playgrounds 
on a regular weekly sched- 
ule organizing activities in 
archery, tennis, and arts and 
crafts. 

There are recreation 
leaders in neighborhood 
archery, tennis, and arts and 
crafts. Playground leaders 



will have the information 
regarding specialists and 
additional schedule infor- 
mation. 

The following play- 
grounds are' supervised by 
Recreation Department 
staff: Atlantic, Beechwood, 
Bradford, Chapel, Faxon 
Park, Fenno Street, Forbes 
Hill, Fore River, Klncaide, 
Labreque, Mass Fields, 
Montclair, O'Rouke, Pal- 
mer, Perkins, Pond Street, 
Shea, Squantum, welcome 
Young, Wollaston. 



The popular folk duo 
Atwater/Donnelly opens the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary concert series Thurs- 
day, July IS, at 12:30 p.m. 

The hour-long concert, 
held on the library lawn in 
Quincy Center, is sponsored 
by the Quincy Arts Council 
and will appeal to people of 
all ages. 

Aubrey Atwater and El- 
wood Donnelly will present 
a concert of traditional 
American folk songs, Celtic 
ballads, a cappella pieces, 
hymns, dance tunes, and 
original works. They blend 
unusual harmonies, play 
guitar, Appalachian moun- 
tain dulcimer, Irish tin 
whistle, harmonica, banjo, 
bones, spoons and other 
surprises. Participation is 
encouraged. 

Atwater/Donnelly are 
self-taught musicians who 
perform widely in the 
Northeast with Aubrey 
venturing solo throughout 
the United States and the 
British Isles. Their six re- 
cordings receive interna- 
tional air play. 

Atwater and Donnelly 
have performed and re- 
search folk music exten- 
sively in New England, Ire- 




POPULAR FOLK DUO Atwater/DmiMlly wUI vpca tkc 
Tboaas Craae Poblk UlMwy coBccrt scrkt Thnnday, Jaly 
15 at 12:3« pjb M tke Hbfwy lawB, Qoiacy Carter. 

land, England, Prince td- ist, Lucie Therrien, who 
ward Island, the Ozarks, and brings music in French and 
Appalachia. This year they in English on July 19. New 
look forward to trips England folk singer, Jim 
throughout New England, as Douglas, concludes the se- 
well as North Carolina, rfes on Aug. 5 with a con- 
Texas, New York, and cert of traditional and con- 



Kentucky. 

The concert series con- 
tinues on July 22 with Two 
of a Kind, a nationally 



temporary folk songs. 

Concerts will be held at 
the Adams Shore branch 



touring husband-wife duo library, 519 Sea St., in case 
from Philadelphia followed of inclement weather. They 
by recording and video art- are free and accessible. 



Box Tops For Education 
Beechwood Knoll Contest 



The Beechwood Knoll 
PTO has a summertime 
fund-raising cunlest under- 
way. 

The students will be 
looking for donations of 
Box Tops For Education 
Coupons found on General 
Mills Cereal Boxes, Golden 
Grahams Treats, Fruit 
Snacks, and Yoplait Yo- 
gurts. Friends, relatives, and 
neighbors of the students 
will be asked to make a 
pledge of Box Tops coupons 
that will be collected during 
the first week of September. 

Also, some students will 
be creating collection boxes 



to be placed in strategic 
places such as business of- 
fices, churches, apartment 
buildings, etc.. If you have 
any Box Tops that you 
would like to donate and/or 
would like more informa- 
tion about this fund-raiser. 



you may call Peggy at 472- 
0728. 

Please help our students 
reach a goal of bettering 
their education. Thank you 
in advance for your help and 
support. 



'Festa Italiano' 

Storyteller Program 

At Adams Shore Library 



Kathleen Callahan 
Bentley College Graduate 



Kathleen Callahan of 
Quincy, a 1995 North 
Quincy High School 
graduate, received a 
Bachelor of Arts degree at 
Bentley College. 



Majoring in English, 
she will attend graduate 
school in the fall. She is 
the daughter of MaryJane 
Callahan and the late 
Michael Callahan. 



The 13th season of the 
Summer Storytellers 
Series continues when 
Storyteller George 
Capaccio returns Tuesday, 
July 13 at 7 p.m. at the 
Adams Shore Branch 
Library 519 Sea St. 

Capaccio's program, 
"Festa Italiano" features 
fables by Leonardo 
Da Vinci, a story about an 
Italian Cinderella named 
Giricocolla and Strega 
Nona. This is a program for 
families with children ages 
5 and older. 



< ••^s, - ' -%-¥mfi»' '4.*^, 






C^Lifjoxd i 

• Elegant Designs 

• Gift Baskets 

• Roses Our Specialty 

1-800-441-8884 

Worldwide Delivery 

479-8884 
1229 HANCOCK ST., 
QUINCY, MA 02169 



FLORISTS 



FLOWERS by HELEN 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For A II Occasions Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



JEWELRY 



(Poison »"'"• ''•*«"y 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 786-7942 

Handicapped Accessible 



GEORGE CAPACCIO 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 
761 SO. ARTERY. QUINCY 

773-7620 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



('S 



Pt)otograptiy 

«^*' Studio 

679 Hancock Stmt, Quincy 



(Wolaston) 
47»-6888 



Mention this ad 
^andrecetDea 
^i5% discount 

on your 
we^Utng flowers] 



LIVERY 



At the same time a 
Pajama Time Storyhour 
with Dottie Moynihan will 
be offered for younger 
siblings accompanied by 
an adult and families with 
children under the age of 
five. "Elephants" is the 
theme for this week 
featuring stories about 
Elmer the plaid elephant 
and an elephant craft. 



Quit Smoking. 




KERRI LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

UMOUSINES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
M PMMfer Stittdi LnowiMS • TowB Cub • Van . SfMddljr Vclkin 
NWiiy Phw* iMvoMria • Ni^ Oi« 
B% Airinh • Coanrti • ilkpMt * SpcdiiiOccMoa 

6I7-472-1 118 Fax: 417*479-0288 



American Heait 
AssodatkmJ 



WE'RE RGHTINe 
FOR YOUR UFE 



# 



Visit the New England 
Aquarium's Traveling Tide 
Pool Friday, July 9 at the 
Adams Shore Branch 
Library. See and handle 
animals that live in salt 
marshes, sandy beaches 
and rocky coastal habitats. 
Children under 7 must be 
accompanied by an adult. 
Registration is required. 
Shows will be held at 9:30 
and 11:30. 

Registration for all 
programs will be held at 
the North Quincy Branch 
381 Hancock St., in person 
or by phone at 376-1320 
during library hours. 
Registration began June 21 
and only a limited number 
of spaces remain 
available. 



^ 



lA^ 



JiS^^.. 



Sec I At- 



Tkundajr, Julys, 1999 TIm Quiaoy Sua Pi|c7 




PASSING THE GAVEL, EUzabcth Uuchte, right, outgo- 
ing worthy advisor of the Wollastoa Assembly No. 10, In- 
tematioDal Order of Rainbow for Giris, welcomes Eliza- 
beth Cattri, the hiconiing worthy advisor, after her installa- 
tion at the Quincy Masonic Temple. 

(Quincy Sun PhotolRobert Noble) 

Elizabeth Caliri 

Wollaston Rainbow 

Worthy Advisor 




Auxiliary Donates $25,000 
To Quincy Hospital 



The Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary donated $25,000 
to the hospital at their 
spring luncheon at the 
Wollaston Golf Club. 

The money will be used 
to purchase new 
mattresses for patient beds. 
A recent donation of 



A business meeting was 
conducted by President 
Carol Herbai. New officers 
for the coming year were 
installed: 

Carol Herbai, president 
for the ninth year; Caroline 
Bornstein, first vice- 
president; Clarees 
McKeon, second vicc- 



$8,000 by the auxiliary ., .., ^.,, . 

contributed to the purchase Pr«>dcnt; llda DiMascio. 

of an electrocardiography recording secretary; 

system for the newly Lorraine 



for the 
expanded and relocated 
Cardiology/Nuclear 
Medicine Suite. 

The annual $1,000 
Bissett Volunteer 
Scholarship Award was 
presented by Karen Tufts, 
Coordinator of Volunteer 
Services, to Courtney 
Paquette, a graduate of 
Notre Dame Academy who Jeffrey Doran provided an 
will attend Holy Cross "P^^^^ on the anticipated 



Edwards, 
corresponding secretary; 
Yolanda Romanelli, 
treasurer; Natalie Fossati, 
assistant treasurer. 

Directors installed 
were: Dorothy Mattson, 
Anne Connolly and 
Mildred Jacobs. 

Guest speaker, CEO 



During a formal evening Ncff, FWA, Installing 

ceremony at the Quincy Chaplain; Julie Sherlock, 

Masonic Temple, Elizabeth PWA, Grand Representative 

Caliri was installed as to Kansas/North Carolina, 

Worthy Advisor of the Installing Marshal; Eliza- 

WoUaston Assembly No. 10 bcth Leuchte, Installing Re- graduate 

of the International Order of colder. State 



PATRICIA LOOBY and JAMES MILANO 

Patricia Looby Engaged 
To James M ilano 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Inc. in Norwell. 

Looby of Marshfield Mr. Milano is a grad- 

announce the engagement uate of Archbishop Wil- 

of their daughter Patricia Hams High School and 



College, majoring in 
Biology/Pre-Med. 

Miss Paquette's other 
volunteer activities 
include Father Bill's Place 
and City Year. She also 
received the Unsung Hero 
award at school for both 
junior and senior years. 



affiliation with Boston 
Medical Center and 
thanked the auxiliary 
members for their services 
to the hospital community. 
Co-chairmen for the 
luncheon were Anne 
Connolly and llda 
DiMascio. 



Rainbow for Girls. 



Marie Looby to James 
John Milano. He is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Milano of Quincy. 

Miss Looby is a 

of Westfield 

College with a 



received a bachelor of 
science degree from 
Springfield College. He is 
employed as a client 
service representative at 



Katherine Sabina, PWA bachelor of science 
In addition, Mrs. Kathy of the Taunton Assembly degree. She is aii office 



the Merrill 
Boston. 



Corp. in 



Robinson was installed as No. 13, was Grand Soloist; 
the new Mother Advisor. Pauline Griffiths was In- 
Elizabeth will be a junior stalling Organist, and Susan 
at Quincy High School in w. Rhodes, a Past Mother 
the fall and will serve as Advisor of the Grand Ex- 
class vice president. An ^cutive Board, was the In- 
honor student, she rcgulariy stalling Mother Advisor. 

J . .^ j^ addition to Kathy Ro- 



earns distinction in her 
classes. Outside school, she 
is a student of ballet, jazz 
and point at the Atlantic 
Dance Studio where she has 
studied 10 years. 

Her court includes Sarah 



binson as Mother Advisor, 
the advisory board includes 
Robert Purpura, chairman; 
Carolyn Leuchte, secretary; 
Susan Abbott, ritualist; 
Elaine Caliri, notices; Don- 



May Chapman, Worthy As- aid Jackson, regalia; Louise 
sociate Advisor; Amara Jackson, treasurer; Deborah 
Robinson, Charity; Kendra Monaghan, refreshments; 



O'Toole, Hope; Rebecca 
Leuchte, Treasurer; Eliza- 
beth Leuchte, Junior Past 
Worthy Advisor (PWA), 
Chaplain, and Kathleen 
Monaghan, Drill Leader. 

Others include Caitlin 
Megguier, Nature; Cassan- 
dra Kenney, Immortality; 
Melissa Neff, PWA, Fidel- 
ity; Julie Sherlock, PWA, 
Patriotism; Elizabeth Jack- 
son, Confidential Observer; 
Brittany Abbott, American 
Flag Bearer, and Kimberly 
Cavanaugh, Rainbow Flag 
Bearer. 

The installing suite in- 
cluded five past worthy ad- 
visors, four from the Wol- 
laston Assembly. 

Caroline Jackson, PWA, 
Grand Representative to 
Alaska/New Jersey, was the 
Installing Officer; Melissa 



We need you. 



Michelle Tasney, regalia, 
and Vicki Tasney, PMA, 
activities. 

Amara Robinson will be 
the Racom Reporter, while 
Carolyn Leuchte also will 
serve as sunshine committee 
chairman. 



manager at CAP Ventures, is planned. 

Jacqueline Bradford 
Providence Honors Graduate 

Jacqueline Bradford of J^nor Society and was the 

Quincy recently graduated recipient of both a four 

from Providence College Y^af lean's Scholarship 

and was honored for her and the 1998-1999 

academic achievements. Student/Performer Theater 

Arts Scholarship. She 

Bradford, graduating acted in both student and 

with a double major, was college theater productions 

cited for achieving the and plans to attend law 
highest academic record in 
both Political Science and 
Theater Arts. She 
graduated with Magna 

Cum Laude honors and is 
a member of the college's 
Liberal Arts Honors 
program. She is also a 
member of Phi Sigma 
Alpha Political Science 



A September wedding ^°"?8e in Manchester, NH 

. . O K4aiie tune m\^rt*mA * 



Christine Maus Receives 
Degree At St. Anselm 

Christine E. Maus, li^r full tuition and fees 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. during her senior year of 
JohnC. Mausof3Picrmont study. The scholarship 
St., recently earned a awards academic cxcel- 
Bachelor of Science degree Icnce, extracurricular in- 
in Nursing from St. Anselm volvement and community 

service. Maus plans a ca- 

Maus was elected to "*' »" Intensive Care 
Sigma Theta Tau, a Nursing Nursing, 
honor society; and Delta 
Epsilon Sigma, an academic 
honor society. She was also 
a four-year member of the 
Anselmian Abbey Players. 

Maus was the recipient 
of The Father Bernard Hol- 
mes OSB senior student 
scholarship which covered 



Sav9 Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



school. 



LITTLE WILLOWS 
PRESCHOOLVdv 

77«173 1^ 

SUMMER FUM^ 

MVMkP/rtMttOM. 

2 Mid 9 Diy Programs ^ 
Uotimd ttiWInaWw— Ofoupr 

AUO ACCIPIINQ PALL 
REQiSTfUTIONS 

WMUy TlMinM, FWd TMps, 
OraNi, PiMlng. wmI Punr 

Our cunteuhim to dMigrwd «M« your 
Vwy hnportanl PrMchodor in mind 

SOWilowSt-WolMton 



With a maw ^m 



Noh) Open 




at the 






Adams Inn 




29 Hancock St.. North Quincy. MA 02171 

617-323-0269 

'Enjoy ?oo\5\dc Service v^ith a 5mile and a Sunset' 

Steaks. ddQ Chicken. Ka-bobs & More! 

Open 7 days for Lunch & Pinner 

ENTERTAINMENT 
Wed.. July 7 - Mark and SheWa 
Thurs.. July & - Prook Street &and 
July 9 - Chrl9 McNeil 
O - Joe Lundblum 





U\gftllgftttst9tt/ngat, 

Pof mc (indii^ni eut) starting 9t.„^ 

Malctt-ovar /T/m ntka-mm with « $50.00 mtkmf puiehaatj.,.^^ 



Mon't Hafreuti. 

Tuocday it Thursdsy S|ioclalc ttartlngat^ 



:oo 



»»» m »»«»«»»«»«»»»««»« n i mm i n ii m »»«»»»»»»»»««»»» m .»»»».». mn , n ,,,,,,,,,,y | ^ 

»■■■••>■■•■•■■■■■■»■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■ H »T 1 3 



Bridal Paekagat Avaflatla • Also taaturing a Ml satvlea nail division 
Wa cany a Ml Una of hah eata pndueis 



AVE DA 




Pigc 8 Tli« Qulaoy Sua Thunday, July 1, 1999 



Celebrating On The 4th And The 5th 




MISS MERRYMOUNT Katelyo Maloney (right) rides in the Merrymount Association 
July 4th parade Sunday with first runner-up Samantha Cohen. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 



QUINCY POLICE COLOR Guard steps along smartly in the Squantum Community 
Association parade. Yes, that's Uncle Sam Rounseville behind them. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 




THE LAWN CHAIR Drill Team takes time after winning a first prize in the Squantum 
Association July 4th parade Monday. Members include (behind banner), Kevin 
Castonguay, 9; Robert Gardner, 12, and Lauren Castoiiguay, 7. Seated, Ann Wetherby, 
drill team leader Jean MacKey, AMcia Gardner and Nancy Gardner. Standing, Richard 
Castonguay, Gingy Lamer, Susan Gray and Bob MacKey. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert NMe) 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

HLL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 

I ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $15.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY S17.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 

[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $20.00 .[ ) PLEASE BILL ME 



CHRISTINA NOE, 6, made a catch during the July 4th throwing contest at Baker Beach, 
Germantown, Monday. (Quincy Sun Photos/Tom Gorman) 




THE CHRISTL\NI FAMILY took first prize in the Merrymount July 4th parade with 
their New England Patriots float and thank you to Bob Kraft for keeping them here. 

(Quncy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 




A TOUCH OF CANADA - Les Setinelles des Varenaes Band from Varennes, Quebec, 
Canada marched in the Merrymount parade Sunday and the Squantum parade Monday. 
Members were overnight guests of Rev. John Swanson (far right) and Union 
Congregational Church. (Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 



Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



Tbunday, July 8, 1999 Tli* Qulnoy Sua Page 9 



2 New Candidates 

Wahlberg Withdraws From 
Ward 1 Council Race 



Sean Donovan To Enroll 
At U.S. Military Academy 



Rosemary Wahlberg, 
who was seen as one of the 
strongest candidates, has 
decided to withdraw from 
the Ward 1 City Council 
race. 

Wahlberg, who is retiring 
Sept. 1 as executive director 
of Quincy Community Ac- 
tion, Inc., had announced 
her candidacy last week. 

She said Tuesday, how- 
ever, she was withdrawing 
for personal reasons. 

"There are some personal 
matters facing me that need 
attention," she said. "And I 
realize now that these mat- 
ters will take up enough 
time and energy to prevent 
me from running the kind of 
campaign that people in 
Ward 1 deserve. 

"I've made this decision 
now so as not to impose too 
much on the kind people 




ROSEMARY WAHLBERG 

grams. Inc. when she retires. 

Wahlberg had been con- 
sidered a strong contender 
for the Ward 1 seat Council 
President Peter Kolson is 
vacating to run for council 
at-large. 

But as she stepped out, 
new candidates stepped into 
the picture. 

Russell Patten, 25, of 



who have expressed support Babcock St., Houghs Neck, 

for my campaign." took out nomination papers 

She said she expects the Tuesday and said he will 

issues to resolve themselves make his official an- 

shortly and to give her time nouncement shortly, 
to volunteer to assist Quincy William Ryan, 46, of 

Community Action Pro- Mallard Run, Adams Shore, 

Summer Reading Program 
At Marshall School 



A summer reading 
program will be held at the 
Clifford Marshall Elemen- 
tary School July 14, 21, 
28, and Aur. 4. 11 and 18 



from 9 to 11 a.m. 

The program is open to 
all Marshall School 
students and families. 



Marvol Itoauty Shop 

) & up 







/ \/' 


■/ /( //( 


(V/ //.■//; ( '('/ 


)ii\ 


/s 




w 


///; (/// 


ciupln 


isi\ on ( oil' ( ii\ (■ 


( ( >li 


illll'^ 






\,ili, 


Inir,/ 1 


III k/l!'J 


• '' )/'( II < ■ (/(/\ 


s U! 


■ S.flll, 


in 


5 


( or 


\(.i: 


\\ i:. 


.Ul IN( ^ • 


(»l 


7-472 


-9(,S 1 





by Laura Andrus and Joan F. Wright 

Director of khuttlii^ DinelorafCommimilfRthamu 
BODY AND SOLES 

As recent research indi- we discover so much to en- 
cates, seniors who regularly joy that we miss when we 
engage in moderate exercise rush by in our daily activities, 
are doing themselves a big At Marina Place (617 -770- 
favor in terms of both physi- 3264), a senior living resi- 
cal and mental benefit. How- (fence, there's so much to do 
ever, older people who want from strolling the beautiful 
to get the proper footwear for boardwalks, to enjoying the 
such exercise m walking and President's Library, Shipyard 
jogging may want to steer Pub, and local shops and res- 
clear of the athletic shoes that taurants. We offer commu- 
have become the footwear of nity living at its best. To in- 
choice for most Americans, quire about our services or for 
These shoes may not be the alook around, stop in at Four 
best (^OQ f(» older people Sei^rt Drive, 
who are concerned aboiit Mjuina Place invites you 
falls. According to a study in to come in and visit week- 
tfae Journal of the American days or weekends. See for 
Geriatrics Society in which yourself what gracious living 
shoes of different sole thick- here o£fers. Our competitive 
nesses and softness were rates ensure a Marina Bay 
compared, older men had location, but fl£^ a Marina 
better balance and awareness Bay price, 
of foot position when they P.S. In the study of shoe 
wore slraes with hard, thin wear mention^ above, U was 
soles. found ^uu walking shoes widt 

Toeing walks b just one hard-rubber or leadier soles 
of life's great plea^res, no appeared to provide the 
matter bow old or young you greatest stability to elderly 
are. When we walk slowly, men. > 



\ 



Quincy 's Sean Donovan "These young men and 

will enroll at the U.S. Mili- women have been chosen 

tary Academy in West from a large and diverse 

Point, N.Y., this fall, an- group of applicants to attend 

nounces Cong. William the country's finest institu- 

Delahunt. tions of higher learning. 

Delahunt noted more Their families, friends and 

than 30 percent of the 12th teachers - as well as their 

Congressional District's Congressman ~ can be very 

mantown, Gregory Hanlcy nominees will be entering proud," Delahunt said, 

of Shed St., Germantown service academies. The na- Donovan is one of 11 

and William Weed of Cur- tio„3| average is about 10 recent high school graduates 

percent. in the 10th Congressional 



took out nomination papers 
last week. 

They will be joining ear- 
lier candidates, Gretchen 
Grant of Bicknell St.. Ger- 



lew Rd., Adams Shore. 



District who will enroll in 
the U.S. Military, Naval, Air 
Force and Merchant Marine 
Academies. 



We need you. 



American Heart 
Association^ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR Lire 



PaineWebber 



Chartos C. Gilbart • FInartclal Advisor along with 



MUNDER 

CAPITAL 
MANAGEMENT 



Cordially invite you to attend a special presentation regarding 

THE FAST-GROWING INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 
OF THE INTERNET AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY 

FEATURING 

CHIP MECHLER, Regional Marketing Director 
Munder Capital Management 

Learn about the explosive growth of the Internet, the companies and industry sectors currently well-posi- 
tioned to profit and benefit from this growth and The Munder, NetNet Fund's portfolio selection process. 

T^iesday, July 13, 1999 - 7:00pin 

and 

Wednesday, July 28, 1999 - 7:00pm 

Braintree Sheraton Hotel 
37 Forbes Road, Braintree, MA 02184 

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED SEATING IS LIMITED! 

Please RSVP as soon as possible at (617) 261-2506 (24 hours) 

This Fund carries additional risk resulting from lack of industry diversification and may not be suitable for all investors. TechiuAogy securities tend to be 
relatively volatile as compared to other types of investments. For more complete information about The Munder NetNet Fund, including charges and ex- 
penses, please call yomr financial consultant Please read the prospectus carefully before investing. DistrilNitoR Funds Distributors, Inc. 



Ever wish you were 
in an SUV 



instead of b 




Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) are 
the most popular vehicles in 
America today for lots of good 
reaisons. They're safer, they're more 
comfortable, they put you on top 
of the world . . . they're just more 
fiin! Get your SUV or any new car 



with a Fast & Easy "Great Rate!' 
Auto Loan from 
Colonial Federal 
Savings Bank. 



6.99 



% 

APR 



Come see us. Or 

call 617-471-0750 

and ask for Angela or Richard. 



mwCarfttor'SH 




COUNOALFanALSmMiSBANK 

QUINCY: 1 5 Beach St.. next to WoBaston Post Office 617- 47 1- 0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle & Wishington St$., next to Stop & Sk^ 781-331-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin St.. next to Stop* Shop 781-767-1776 

Annuai Percencage Rate (APR) nibject to change. Payment equals $23.94 per $1«X) borrowed. 

Other rates & temu and used car loan latei are availabie. It may abo make feme 
to pay 6ir your new car using a home equity loan. Please ask for more informabon! 



FDIC 



^ 



W»UW»UUV/4%UV*'»'^'*U%»%UV*U%%%\\%VAU%U^^ 



■'» >'♦' '♦# ♦♦ '*■ ' ^ ♦ 



.'. aV V. 



Page 10 Tl&« Qulnoy am> Thuriday, Jiijy >, If9» 



Health Center Offer Before Council Aug. 2 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

The finance committee 
of the City Council will dis- 
cuss at its next meeting, 
scheduled Aug. 2, an offer 
to buy the vacant John F. 
Kennedy Health Center. 

Last week, a city council 
agenda item only mentioned 
that Global NAPS had of- 
fered to purchase city- 
owned property. 

"This is the first time I 



have heard about this," said 
Ward 5 Councillor Stephen 
Durkin. "I have several 
questions about this public 
building regarding apprais- 
als and whether there were 
any other offers to pur- 
chase." 

Frank Gangi, president of 
Global NAPS, was one of 
two bidders for the property, 
said Public Works Commis- 
sioner David Colton. 



Global Naps had bid 
$429,229. The other bidder, 
the AFL-CIO, had bid 
$425,000. 

"Under law, we can only 
negotiate with the highest 
bidder," said Colton, "and 
we got them up to 
$550,000." 

He said the building was 
appraised at $485,000. 

It was last December 
when the city council 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLmCAL ADVERTISEMENT 



We're Having a 



lujth 




Senator Mkhatl W. Mormse^ 



ax 









unanimously voted to put 
the vacant property on the 
market. 

It is a two-story, 18,914- 
square-foot building on a 
25,346-square-foot lot, as- 
sessed at $1,083,600. 

The building was built in 
the 1940s and renovated 
during the 1950s, according 
Colton. 

At the time he estimated 
it would cost $1.5 million to 
upgrade the building which 
needs new wiring, a new 
heating system and a ramp 
and an elevator to make it 
handicapped accessible. 



Quit Smoking^ 



American Heart 
AssodadooJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



"We've been working on 
this for more than a year," 
said Gangi, who presently 
has its headquarters at 10 
Merrymount Road. 

"We plan to invest more 
than $1 million," he said. 
Already, he has reached an 
agreement with Quincy 
contractor Louis Pasqua- 
lucci and Son Inc. To totally 
rehab the building. 

"He will begin as soon as 
I give the check to city 
hall," said Gangi. 

Global NAPS is a pri- 
vately held telephone com- 
pany which competes with 
Bell Atlantic. 

He said the "new" 
building would become 
Global NAPS' world head- 
quarters. In addition to 
Quincy, he has switching 
sites in New York City, Re- 
ston, Va., and Miami, Fla. 



He said presently the com- 
pany serves customers in the 
United States and Canada. 

Last December Mayor 
James Sheets said the city 
had considered upgrading 
the building at a cost of 
between $800,000 and 
$900,000; however, the ac- 
tual bids were nearly dou- 
ble. 

Arline Goodman, a can- 
didate for Ward 5 city coun- 
cillor, said last week she 
wanted the proposed sale to 
be discussed at a public 
hearing and submitted a 
letter to that effect to the 
councillors. 

"Selling this prime piece 
of city -owned real estate to 
Global NAPS for $550,000 
is a serious mistake and 
does not serve the best in- 
terests of the citizens of 
Quincy," she wrote. 



Thursday, iu\y 22, 1999 

6-8pm 



Marina Bay, Ctumc^ 

lrad\X\onQ\ Summertime Cookoux 

OonaUon $20 per person 

Paid and authorized by The Committee to Re-Elect Michael W. Momssey. P.O. Box 215. North QuiiKy, MA 02171 



G.]. Coddington's 



FAMILY RESTAURANT (617) 472-9950 

Kitchen Under New Management... Exciting New Specials! 

Featuring . . . Pasta • Seafood • Chicken • Prime Rib 

|~20% OFFYourEnlirVBm'l 

I 5-9pm Daily | 

I with this coupon. Excluding beverage, alcohol & tax. Gratuity based on full value. i 

' Onecouponpercustomer, not valid with other promotions or discounts. Exp. 7/31/99 

Outdoor Patio Dining in Historic Quinof Center 
Private function Room Available FREE Validated Parking 

1250 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY CENTER 






HORTH QUIHCy HIGH SCHOOL 



/CMIOR /TAy-OUT *99? 



.^^ 



(-^ 






\ 



Mt 



Gratefully Acknowledges and Appreciates the Community 

Support of the After Prom Party ^ 

*"^^ •• WITH mSTINaiON: Vv/ >^ 

City of Quincy Dr. Allan H. Yocubian Quincy Police Deportment Rodie Irothen State Street Bonk Stop & Shop Supennarket 

WITH HIGH HONORS: 



Councillor Bruce Ayers 
Rotary Club off Quincy 



AltnisaliflOffQuiiicy,!!* 
Am PlMlai^ RJL 
ARtboiiy J. Koury, DMO 
AiiHMiiy P«kM^ Stylists tac 
AtioirtkMMdkSdMvlPTO 



Jinnny Joy Productions 
Squontun School Students t PTO 

WITH HONORS: 

CoImM Ptdwd Soviifs BmIi 
C>p d« idSt.«iM 

Cit— llei w t tfhwmMrt 

cm 



Joe IGntigose, PAL 
The Quincy Sun 



John Gruioso, DARi Offficor 
Woilaston Business Center 



SdM^fsSlidMlCMndl D'Mgdt's SoMlwidi Sbofi 



AIIm Liqiion 
MionMy vMf|9 BwIm 
lorry's Mi RMhMnMt 

■MH# SI* nM Morfcol 
MU A Alicia SardMT 

IrifllMM's ko CfMMi 

Iwlw'fSMlMd 
CMnriM'sCafo 



DaiM6.Ray«oidi 



NoMock fl irtr Shop 
ImococIi Strooi Cor Wosb 
BoMiy BosiMitl^ 9r* 

JoAoH BfOBI 

KoHohtr A Modify lecAgcy. 



MBoHo'sPiiioASolM 

DisHodivoDryClMMrt 

Boodoo'sPiiM 



KipOrloMlo'fHoirSlyliiW 



Knorio 
loooorrfo's Soioo A Spo 
liodoSrito 



CM St. Ami's SdMoinO 

iitori Star Moriwt COiy loK* 

lUMLllodwyloottorf Staifai MiMo SdMol PTO 

IUMU.SocfwBoosion S ta td w Ii i woo M AtwKy 

UAMJL ttrrs VoMoyhoB low lwr s f d i woi's Coroor 

OcoooSproy SoporChoff 

OwMiOlNiy'slosiaoiMl Todosdrf Pood Shops 

PoolMoioMdBoihUi IhsOripMl lily's foMOsSooiNd 

Ihof 101010 Cfcost 

lUsTohoslboCoko 
IhiCoUi 

t » - ll—ll JM if I , 

tmm% MOi nlirwilOOi 



POMO off H 

NpsiCohi 



Mmoh s ToMco SoffVNi Stalioo 



Pordy'sko 
QoiiKyCor 



Corpot lovivol 
CoilMy rocinc 



pro 



rohoisiTooT( 






pro 



ffoor Nor popor a sopp^f %m» 



Roflor BroBMn C*. 

H4JU.iasol 
R4JU.Chrf 



flro's 




Ali«Mr 



Colo 



Thunday, July 8, 1999 Tli« Quinagr Sun Page 11 



Wollaston Manor Residents To Meet 
Friday On Affordable Housing Issue 



By MARILY7«f JACKSON 

Wollaston Manor resi- 
dents will meet at 1 p.m'. 
Friday in the community 
room to organize them- 
selves in an effort to pre- 
serve their apartment com- 
plex as affordable housing. 

In early May the resi- 
dents first learned of the 
implications of living in a 
subsidized high rise: The 
landlord can prepay the 
mortgage and turn afford- 
able apartments into market- 
rate housing, which could 
easily double the rents now 
in effect. 

Staff from the Mass Alli- 
ance of HUD Tenants have 
been working with the resi- 
dents in an effort to obtain 
assurances from the prop- 
erty owner, AIMCO 
(Apartment Investment and 
Management Company) of 
Denver that rents would 
remain affordable. 

According to Virginia 
Kelly of the alliance, before 
the high rise was built in 
1972, the Zoning Board of 
Appeals specified that a 
variance to construct the 12- 
story building with 164 
apartments at 91 Clay St. at 
91 Clay St. would be 
granted on the condition that 
25 percent of the units 
would be allocated to as 
affordable housing for the 
elderly. 

Mayor James Sheets has 
asked City Solicitor Stephen 
McGrath to research 
whether the requirement 
imposed by the appeals 
board remains in perpetuity 
or whether even the 25 per- 
cent allocation dissolves 
when the mortgage with the 
Mass. Housing Finance 
Agency is paid in full. 

Last week, more than 80 
residents signed a letter to 
Mary Ellen Mederios of 

AIMCO in Taunton, asking 
for an appointment to dis- 
cuss keeping Wollaston 
Manor affordable. 

"We would be ' most 
grateful if you would set up 

James Donnelly 

On Colby 

Dean's List 

James E. Donnelly of 
Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List at Colby 
College for the spring se- 
mester. 

Donnelly, a member of 

the Qass of 2000, is the son 
of Paul and Margaret Don- 
nelly. 

A graduate of Quincy 
High School, he is majoring 
in biology with a concentra- 
tion in environmental sci- 
ence. 



an appointment to sit down 
and discuss this matter with 
us, as time is everything at 
our age, and we do not want 
to lose our homes as many 
adjustments would have to 
be made, especially for 
those losing their eyesight 
and the physically handi- 
capped... 

"One of our issues is if 
AIMCO wants to sell the 
building, we would like 
AIMCO to sell at a price 
which, when combined with 
tax credits and other subsi- 
dies, will keep Wollaston 
Manor affordable to current 
and future residents," they 
wrote. 

A week earlier, residents 
sent individual letters to 
Gov. Paul Cellucci, asking 
him to sign the so-called 
Enabling Act (H1548 and 
S567)) which would allow 
any Massachusetts commu- 
nity to regulate rents and 
subsidies in HUD-assisted 
buildings if the federal gov- 
ernment deregulates them. 

If an owner of a HUD- 
financed building decides to 
pre-pay the mortgage and 
raise rents or if he decides to 
cancel the project-based 
Section 8 contract, the Ena- 
bling Act would allow the 
city to hold a referendum to 
protect the affordability of 
residents' homes. 

The mortgages are typi- 
cally for 40 years, but the 
property owners are allowed 
to pre-pay the mortgage 
after 20 years. At Wollaston 
Manor, the owner has been 
eligible for mortgage pre- 
payment since 1995. 



"The residents don't 
want AIMCO to sell to the 
highest bidder who would 

make it condos," said Kelly. 
Residents who already live 
at Wollaston Manor would 
be allowed to stay, but once 
the resident moves or passes 
away, then that unit would 
go to market rate, she said. 

"Wollaston Manor is a 
great location," she contin- 
ued, "especially with the 
nearby Wollaston MBTA 
station, the CVS and the 
shopping district." 

At Friday's meeting, 
several officials are ex- 
pected to attend, intcluding 
U.S. Rep. William Delahunt 
or his representative. Rep. 
Bruce Ayers, a Ward 6 
councillor, along with 
Councillors Stephen Durkin 
and Patrick McDermott, 
Jane Reikard, executive 
secretary of the city's Rent 
Grievance Board, and 
Aleisa Gardner of Quincy 
Community Action Pro- 
grams Inc. 

"This is expiring use 
[clause] leaves people dan- 
gling," said Reikard. "The 
residents want some protec- 
tion." 

Under government regu- 
lations, HUD-financed 
landlords must notify resi- 
dents a year in advance if 
they plan to pre-pay. their 
mortgages. As a result, ten- 
ants are receiving annual 
letters that their apartments 
could be prepaid. 

Reikard said she is con- 
cerned that HUD no longer 
wants to allocate funding for 



housing. "HUD is trying to 
get out of the housing busi- 
ness," she said. 

Even if properties are no 
longer site-specific for Sec- 
tion 8 housing, giving ten- 
ants Section 8 vouchers is a 
short-term solution, Reikard 
continued. With soaring real 
estate costs, the Section 8 
allowance will not cover 
two-thirds of the rent in 
market-rate housing. 

When Reikard said she 
believed there is less than a 
1 percent vacancy rate for 
rental housing in Quincy, 
Joe Daly of Apartment 
Connections countered that 
the vacancy rate was zero. 

In the past, said Reikard, 
there were between 50 and 
75 vacancies at this time of 
year. "I never thought I 
would see $l,000-a-month 
rents when I took this job 23 
years ago," she said. 




CUB SCOUTS James Hokomb, Danld Richards and John 
Rowland of Pack 11, St Chrysostom's Church, recently 
planted flowers at a memorial marker at the Parker School 
honoring Bemle McDougaU, a North Quincy native Ulkd in 
tlw Korean War. 



Established 
in 1960 

20 years under 
same ownership 




DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

starting at ^4'^ 

1 1 :30am-3:00pm 
Monday - Saturday 

Famous for Home Cooking 
Generous Portions - Reasonable Prices 

Enterhinment 

Wednesday through Sunday Nights 



Restaurant b Lounge 
15 n=raMiM Street. Quincy. MA 02169 • Te^: 472-/7/5 | 



Want to avoid checking fees: 



en in 
lincy 

(it Granite 



Direct Cheekily 
means direct savings* 



Avoiding checking fees is easy. Simply direct yourself to 
South Shore Savings Bank and arrange for direct deposit of your 
paycheck; social security check, or other regular payment to a 
Direct Checking Account. If s convenient ... and a terrific value: 

To open your Direct 
Checking Account, stop 
by any of our convenient 
locations or call us today. 




NO monthly fee 



NO per check fees 



NO minimum balance 



Member FDIC/Dtf 



South Shore 

SAVINGS BANK 

A great community^bank! 
(800) 660-7800 

East Bridgewater • East Weymouth • Hanover/Norwell 

North Weymouth • Quincy • South Weymouth 

Weymouth • Weymouth Landing 




aunimm' 
ReaMiing Pro^vm 



>e-iB 



Parents: 

Your kids can wmfree bicycles Jrom 
Dependable Cleaners finr reading one 
(or more) books during the Summer. 

30 BkyCKS win be given to students wiiosc names arc drawn 
from those digibie. Receive one cnoy ibr eadi book lead between 
June 1, 1999 and July 19, 1999. Parents s^ dx form and verify 
the eooy. See lula ar any Dependable locaiioo. 



^pectai dunb to die panidpatiiig tdMwb and 
tchool tjtteiBi and our co-ip<MMon. 



TlieRtfriaCLe(%er 



tfeWkkti 







O^mt 7^7, Sundav 10-9 

24 Hour Dnt/yoir 

AutonrnUe Sanm Day S9nflo9 



COHASSET tHEVMOUm 

NSalMiSl IWMvSl 

BMMTIB 






scnunc 

SHOMaaM. 
(7I1)S«-7M 

mKst¥M,m.m 

auMiSL 

(7I1)7«4III 
NaWEYMOUm 
(7ll)»-7«77 
WNOUBMkLn 



QUMCXUMnSq. 
WMnaat 

in7)n»«H 

WOtUKTOW 

i17)nMBI 
EMTMUQM 



aXMncyAM 

(n7)77Mat 

MCKIBtTOMN 
ISIGriwSl 

BMXBffr 
31«NMtey3L 



aiHrariat 

|n7)73H4« 



P7)W-1M 



Page 12 TTtim Quiimy Bvux Thuriday, July 8, 1999 



Fr. Bill's Food Fest At 
The Summer House Aug. 18 



Father Bill's Place an 
nual Food Fest and Auction 
will be held Wednesday, 
Aug. 18 from 6 to 10 p.m. at 
The Summer House, located 
at Marina Bay. 

Honorary chairman is 
sports broadcaster Sean 
McDonough, three time 
New England Emmy award 
winner and the television 
voice of the Boston Red 
Sox. 

Last year, Fr. Bill's Place 
Food Fest was moved from 
Presidents Place in Ouincy 
Center to The Summer 
House at Marina Bay to 
accommodate the larger 
crowd. This year the event 
is expanding again into the 
adjacent Raw Tent which 
offer panoramic views of 
Marina Bay and the harbor. 

"We simply ran out of 
room after the second year," 
said Fr. Bill McCarthy, 
founder of Quincy homeless 
shelter that bears his name. 
"The committee thought we 
could add a little atmos- 
phere. As it turns out, we 



added a lot of atmosphere." 

The event will feature 
some of the best cuisine and 
fine wines from fme restau- 
rants throughout the South 
Shore. The Chris Luard Jazz 
Trio will perform. 

The live auction will 
offer upscale bid items, in- 
cluding vacation packages, 
25-inch color television, 
sport event tickets. Beanie 
Babies and more. 

Celebrity auctioneers 
will include Mayor James 
Sheets and local business 
owners. 

Jim Wells, owner of Ab- 
badessa's Restaurant in 
Hingham and event chair- 
man the past four years, has 

teamed up with Michael 
Cheney, chairman of First 
Night Quincy. 

"Jim has done an out- 
standing job in bringing 
together 25 of the finest 
restaurants on the South 
Shore," Cheney said. "Jim 
and Fr. Bill have worked 
hard to secure some exciting 



auction items. 

"I know everyone is go- 
ing to love this event and 1 
am honored to play a small 
role in this exciting event 
for a great cause," Cheney 
added. 

Proceeds will benefit Fr. 
Bill's Place. Tickets are $50 
each and include admission, 
food and sample of fine 
wines. 

Fr. Bill's Place, operated 
by the Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition, has 
served over 1,200 undupli- 
cated clients in the last fis- 
cal year. The majority of 
them come from the Quincy 
and South Shore area. 

QISC and Fr. Bill's Place 
are only partially funded by 
public dollars. Each year 
QISC needs to raise more 
than 40% of its total budget 
through donations and fund- 
raising. 

For tickets, call (617) 
376-2255. Credit cards ac- 
cepted. 

For event information, 
call Cheney at 471-1493. 





BREAKFAST 

7 days a week 

all day 



Early American Restaurant 

Since 1988 
1054 Hancock Street, Quincy • 328-8225 

Open Daily at 7am 
HOUSE SPECIALTY - Our Famous Homemade Corned Beef Hash 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



ELECT 
WILLIAM F. WEED 

CANDIDATE FOR dTY COUNCIL 
WARD I-DEMOCRAT 

A STRONG, 



INDEPENDENT 
VOICE FOR 




WARD I 



WARD 



TRAFFIC SAFETY ON SEA STREET. 

THE CITY DEBT SERVICE IS OUT OF 

CONTROL!!! 

YOUNG ADULTS NEED MORE SOCIAL 

AND RECREATION PROGRAMS. 

THE FUTURE OF THE CVS BUILDING 

IN MERRYMOUNT??? 

HOW MUCH WILL THE HOSPITAL 

REALLY COST QUINCY TAXPAYERS? 

Commiaee to Elect William F. Weed. Jason Kane. Chainnu 




LORETTA DeGRAZIA, owner of East Coast Petroleum in Quincy, recently received a 
proclamation from Mayor James Sheets for being named the New England Women's 
Business Association's '^Businesswoman of the Year" for 1998. Also on hand to congratulate 
her at left is her father, Gaetano, presenting a bouquet of roses from her East Coast 

Petroleum staff. 

(Sun i^otolRobert Noble) 

Jim Flaherty Elected President 
Of Quincy Community Action 



Jim Flaherty was re- 
cently elected president of 
Quincy Community Action 
Programs, Inc. at its 34th 
annual meeting held at the 
Fours Restaurant. 

There were 85 friends 
and Board members on hand 
to celebrate the agency's 
accomplishments. 

Also elected were: 

Zaida Shaw, vice presi- 
dent; Janet Crowley, treas- 
urer; Joanne Condon-Walsh, 
assistant treasurer; and 
Linda Kelly, secretary. 

The Board of Directors 



consist of members repre- 
senting Mayor James Sheets 
and the City Council. It also 
consists of members elected 
from the Atlantic, German- 
town, Quincy Point and 
South West neighborhoods. 
Members represent busi- 
ness and labor. The total 
number of Board members 
is 30 citizens who either live 
or work in Quincy. 

The Board honored 
Linda Robinson, a long-time 
Board member, for her out- 
standing work. 

The Board of Quincy 



Community Action Pro- 
grams, Inc., annually honors 
a staff person in the memory 
of Lois Craig, a former 
QCAP/Head Start teacher 
who passed away in 1993. 
Ms. Craig was an outstand- 
ing professional and the 
Board selected Hobart 

"Sonny" Morgan as this 
year's recipient of the "Lois 
Craig Award." Morgan is 
the auditor/inspector for the 
QCAP/Energy Program. He 
follows five other staff 
members who have been so 
honored. 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



CHRISTINE M. CEDRONE 

RE-ELECTION 

to the 

QUINCY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

ANNOUNCEMENT 
KICKOFF FUNDRAISER 

$20 recommended donation 

Pat Flanagan's 
79 Parkingway, Quincy, MA 02 169 

Thursday, July 8, 6pm - 9pm 

DJ - Hors d'oeuvres - Cash Bar 




CEDRONE 



Paid (or by the Cedrone G>niinittee 
75 Palmer St.. #610, (^lincy, MA 02 169 (617) 479-22 17 V11U7 J. Scamki, Campa^ ChainnM 



Thurid«y.July8,l999 Tl>» Qiiiamy 8m> Page 13 



Russell Patten Candidate 
For Ward 1 Council Seat 



Russell Patten, 25, of 
120 Babcock St., Houghs 
Neck is a candidate for the 
Ward 1 City Council seat. 

Patten took out 
nomination papers Tues- 
day and said he will soon 
officially announce his 
candidacy. 

"1 feel this is the perfect 
time for me to run," Patten 
said, "This city is a great 
place and I believe that 1 
have the ability to keep 
positive things happening 
and work for even greater 
success in the future." 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, he attended 
Quincy Public Schools 
graduating from Quincy 
High School in 1992. He 
graduated from Suffolk 
University in 1996 with a 
Bachelor of Science 
degree in Communica- 
tions. He was a June 
graduate of Suffolk 
University Law School and 
will be sitting for the 




RUSSELL PATTEN 

Massachusetts Bar Exam- 
ination at the end of Julv. 

He and his family have 
deep ties to the city. His 
father, Russell Patten Jr. is 
a lieutenant in the Quincy 
Fire Department and his 
grandfather, Russell Patten 
Sr., was also a Hrefighter 
for many years. His family 
includes his mother. 
Donna Patten, his brother, 
Matthew Patten and his 



sister, Lisa Patten. 

Patten has been active 
as a campaign worker and 
spent a summer as an 
intern in City Clerk Joseph 
Shea's office. 

With the new millen- 
nium approaching. Patten 
said he believes Ward One 
is in "great shape, and that 
much of that has to do 
with the fine work of 
Councillor Peter Kolson." 

"Kolson has worked 
very hard to help the 
people of Ward One. We 
have the lowest crime rate 
in the city and a bright 
future ahead". Patten said. 

"While the .future in 
indeed bright for Ward 
One, vigilance is very 
important. "With so much 
success in Ward One we 
must be careful not to lose 
the things that make it a 
wonderful place to live 
and do business." Patten 
cites environmental and 
quality of life issues as his 
greatest priorities. 



Senate Budget Version Would 
Increase Quincy's State Aid 



State Senator Michael 
Morrissey reports that the 
Senate version of the fiscal 
year 2000 budget provides 
for generous increases to 
Quincy 's local aid and 
chapter 70 education assis- 
tance fiinds. 

"The Senate version of 
the budget increases 
Quincy 's local aid by 12.1% 
for a total of $9,182,520," 
said Morrissey. "These state 
funds help local government 
respond to the priorities they 
identify themselves." 

One of the most note- 
worthy components of the 



Senate budget, he said, is 
the $245 million increase in 
education assistance and 
fulfills the funding promise 
in the Education Reform 
Act of 1993. The Senate 
budget provides 

$12,679,625 to Quincy 



schools, which is an in- 
crease of $1,310,250 over 
last year, and an increase of 
$464,385 over what the 
House is proposing for next 
year. The Governor's 
budget spends $90 million 
less than the Senate. 



Michael O'Brien 
On Colby Dean's List 

Michael P. O'Brien of the Class of 2000, is the son 



Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List for the 
spring semester at Colby 
College. 

O'Brien, a member of 



of William and Constance 
O'Brien. 

A graduate of Milton 
Academy, he is majoring in 
economics and Spanish. 



Call About Our Move In Special 



'Z^iVER 'Bay Club 

4- 

...a retirement community that won't cramp your 
styky your furniture or your pocketbook. 



Who says moving to a retirement 
community means giving up 
space? At River Bay Club, you can 
select from a variety of spacious 
apartment plans. Every style is 
fully equipped with everything 
you need. There are no endow- 
ment fees, and the monthly rates 
are very affordable. 



Come see what you're missing at River Bay Club 
For more information or to schedule a personal tour please call- 

617-472-4457 

RJvtr Bay Qub provides equal opportunities to all individuals 62 years of age or older. Q^ 

□ Please send mc information on River Bay Qub 
Q Please conuct me4o arrange a personal tour 




Name: _ 
Address: 
City: __ 



Sutc: 



Phone: _ 
Zip Code: 



QS0699 Mail to: River Bay aub, 99 Brackott Street, Quincy, MA 02169 ^ 



Sean Scanlon Graduates 
NU Magna Cum Laude 



Sean P. Scanlon, son of 
Mary and Patrick Scanlon of 
Wollaston, has graduated 
from Northeastern Univer- 
sity magna cum laude, with 
a double major degree, Po- 
litical Science and History. 

He is a member of 
Northeastern 's Honors Pro- 
gram; Golden Key National 



Honors Society; Phi Alpha 
Theta, International History 
Honors Society; Pi Sigma 
Alpha, The National Politi- 
cal Science Honors Society; 
the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences Academy Program for 
Undergraduate Scholars; 
and the Northeaster's Pre- 
Law Society. 



He is in the 1997-1998 
"Who's Who among 
American College and Uni- 
versity students" and on the 
National Deans List. He is 
also a member of Quincy 
Historical Society. 

Sean will be attending 
the Suffolk University 
School of Law this fall. 



77ie tax-deductible 
coUege, swimming 

poof, vacation, 

or anything 

llfome equity loan. 



lAPR 



Equity line of 

credit: 6.99%. 

for ^months, then 

Prime less V2%' 

for the life of the loan 



No fees, no closing costs, no points, no 
companion accounts, no restrictions on use 



theEANKof 

CANTON 



'Check with your tax advisor as to the deduct- 
ibility of Interest. tFinance charge Is based on 
the Prime Rate published in the wall Street Jour- 
nal on the last business day of the month. 
Rates subject to change. 

275 Quincy Ave., Quincy 
557 Washington st, Canton 



ksSs^K'fl^f'sd**? 



i|Af%l 







$€11991 1$ mf 



Kids age 18 and under can eat 

fFREE meals this sunf^mer \f 
at any of the following locations: M 

Quincy Public Schools, 1999 
Summer Food Service Program Lunch Sites 



Site Name, Address 



Dates of Operation, Lunch Times Site Activities 



Snug Harbor School June 28 - Sept. 3 

(Outdoor Shelter) 11:00 - 1:00 
333 Palmar St., Sermantown 

Quincy Housing Authority June 28 - Sept. 3 

(at Circle). 11:00-1:00 
9 Bicknell Circle, fiermantown 



Lincoln Hancock 
Elementary School 
300 Granite Street 



July 6 - August 27 
11:30-1:30 



T—*^^ » > > » I 



« If i .i i, < ■ i l .i i» t i> il l J i ll 



• ' . . » J r , . . . T t ...... . 



Ward II Community Center July 6 - August 27 

16 Nevada Road 11:30-1:30 

Atlantic Neighborhood Center July 6 - August 27 

11 Hayward Street 11:30-1:30 



Recreation, 
Arts and Crafts 



Recreation, 
Arts and Crafts 



Community Pool, 
Recreation 



Recreation Programs, 
Community Center Activities 

Recreation Programs, 
Community Center Activities 



fWI Mmif IMfWMMIIIOMr CAU 

1^ 617-984-8768 ^ 

T>K Sumer Food Scrvia Oxigram frohtiits dtoinWution be^^ 

Sponsord b)r t(K Mtsnivmtts Department of Education Ifr^ 



Pttgjt 14 Th^ Quincy Sim TTiuraday, July >, lf» 




Flynn & Co. Brokers 
14-Acre Land Sale 



Patricia Sullivan South Shore 
Realtor Of The Year 



Daniel J. Flynn & Co. 
Senior Vice-President Jay 
Nuss recently brokered the 
sale of over 14 acres of land 
in Weymouth's Libbey 
Park. 

The land will be devel- 
oped by Harvest Ministries, 



REPORT 

STREET UGHT 

OUTAGES 

24 hours, 
7days 

376-1490 



who will break ground for a 
42,000 square foot church in 
April 2000. 

Flynn & Co. served as 
the sole broker in the trans- 
action, worth $525,000. 
Flynn President Paul Talk- 
owski said. "The South 
Shore should continue to 
prosper in coming years. 
The upcoming several 
months should be very fruit- 
ful as some major develop- 
ment projects in the area get 
under way." 



Harvest Ministries is a 
Boston-based Christian 

church of about 600 parish- 
ioners. A representative of 
Harvest Ministries, Olinda 
Urizar, estimates that the 
project will be completed 
around November 2000. 

Daniel J. Flynn & Co. is 
a full service real estate firm 
specializing in commercial 
sales and leasing, residential 
real estate and real estate 
auctions. For more informa- 
tion, call 617-479-9000. 



Carolyn Flaherty Top Lister 
At Quincy Jack Conway Office 

Carolyn Flaherty has Jack Conway and Company 
been named top seller in the real estate office in Quincy 

for the month of May. 



FLAVIN & FLAVIN 

Real Estate 



m. '' 






MARGUERITE 

FLAVIN 

Your Real Estate 

goals are my 

business. 

Call 617-479-1000 




Buying, Selling o! Investing? 

Coll Tom McForland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 328-3200 



Top lister honors were 
shared by Dona Nightingale, 
Melissa Higgins and Gloria 
Skolnik. 



ERA 
CKNTRAL 

Ri \i I SI vn: 



WOLLASTON OFFICE 

Lynne Houghton, Manager 
Dave Andrews Carol Cahill 

Richard Colarusso Margie Duffy 
Sandra Fennelly Carolyn Flaherty 



Dan Goichman 
Corinne Getchell 
Beverly Joyce 
Dona Nightingale 
Jaimie Paz 
Donna Williams 



Mike Goodrich 
Melissa Higgins 
Ernie Light 
Patrick Mulkem 
Gloria Skolnick 
Osman Yesilcimen 



Give One of Us a Call! 

Conway 

\fAI«LY GROUP ' 



JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC.™ 

Call for a Free 

Market Analysis! 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

wwwjackconway.com 




Patricia Sullivan, 
manager of the ERA 
Central Real Estate branch 
office, Hancock St., 
Quincy, was named 1999 
Realtor of the Year of the 
South Shore Association of 
Realtors at awards cere- 
monies held at the 
Summer House at Marina 
Bay, Quincy. 

Sullivan received the 
honor for her outstanding 
service and contribution to 
the real estate profession 
and the South Shore 
Association of Realtors. 

An active member of 
the board since 1986, she 
currently serves as 
chairman of the Realtor 
Community Service Com- 
mittee, and member of the 
Professional Standards 
Committee. Under her 
leadership on the RCS 
Committee, the asso- 
ciation has been awarded 
second place in the 
Massachusetts Association 
of Realtors, Realtor's 
Community Service Scrap- 
book Contest. 

Sullivan has partici- 
pated in the building of 
several Habitat for 



fimRisr&f nit BIMM9 
(m$iunit9? 

ixiKom Yoim opnoNSI 

Vtm fya-Tfrn fU0i 

isrm eoMsmmfrf 

32i-f3f2 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 

SERVICE ^ MOBILE 

AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 

•DEAOWITSINSTAUED 

•LOOSKIIEVED 

•DOOiaOSBB 

•PANKHAWWAIE 

•MITOKEVSHTTED 

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM! 

755 SO. ARTERY, QUINa 

472-2177 



-CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Acmtt froM MockbMtcr A Qiriaqr T 




QUINCY 
Home is where the heart is! And your heart will love 
Preside nt's HilL CbvmiBg 4 bedroom coionial with lovefy 
fireplaccd liriag room, 2 ML baths and two car (aragc 
CoaMamiscc$319,9M 




Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

When you're #1 yon can do things others can't 

Sec all our Hstfaigi at: www.c21aiiiiei.coai 




PATRICIA SULLIVAN of ERA Central Real Estate is the 
South Shore Association of Realtors 1999 Realtor of the 
Year. Congratulating her here is Yin Moscardclli, owner of 
ERA Central 



Humanity Houses in the 
area and has taken part in 
the Walk for Breast 
Cancer and the Walk for 
Hunger over the past 
several years. In addition, 
through her Committee, 
hundreds of gifts have 
been donated through the 
Adopt-a-Family Program 
during the holiday season 
and they continue to 
collect non-perishable 
items for local area food 
pantries at SSAR events. 

A member of the ERA 
broker counsel, Sullivan 
has helped raise over 
$50,000 over the past three 
years for Muscular Dys- 
trophy through Golf tourna- 
ments and "Bail and Jail" 
programs and has also 
participated in the annual 
Flag Day parade in Quincy 
for the company. 

Present at the awards 
reception was her husband, 



Brian, daughter Whitney, 
son Brian Patrick, her 
mother, Edith Gallagher 
and other family members, 
friends and associates form 
ERA Central Real Estate. 
In all, over 140 members, 
friends and guests were in 
attendance to honor 
Sullivan. 

As local Board Realtor 
of the Year, her names 
will be placed in 
nomination for receipt of 
the Massachusetts Realtor 
of the Year Award to be 

presented in October at the 
Massachusetts Association 
of Realtor's Convention to 
be held in Boston. 

The South Shore 
Association of Realtors is 
one of over 1800 Asso- 
ciations that comprise the 
National Association of 
Realtors and is the "Voice 
for Real Estate" throughout 
the South Shore. 



(Mffa 

STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squantum, MA 02171 

Mm (617) 328-9400 

A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 



tsi 




Thiinday,Jiily8,1999 TlMQuiiftOjSun PafelS 



Hit a Home Run with these l/l/^^Sr 




/ Real 






QUINCY 

Great visibility for your 
business! 1600 SF retail 

storefront along Route 3 A. 

Business B Zoned. Located 

along MBTA bus route. 

Orrered at $219,900 

or lease at $2^0Q/aiooth 



QUINCY 

Former restaurant just off of 

Hancock St. in N. Quincy. 2 

levels, 8.800 SF. 10.995 SF 

lot includes lot directly 

across street. Business B 

zoned. 

OflSerad at $695,000 









^^^H .^^^ ^|V^^I 


NORTH QUINCY 

Hancock Street retail 
opportunity in great car and 
foot trafTic area. 3.630 SF in 
first floor and basement. On- 
site paridng. Business B 
zoned 
Oflrered at $349,000 


1 - 


~-*-^*?3 






1 








QUINCY CENTER 

Hancock Street Gass A 
office space for lease. 2,600 

SFi, beautiful conference 

room, spacious bullpen area, 

convenient access by car or 

train, adjacent to municipal 

parking garage. 

For Lease at $14^/SF 




QUINCY 

Retail store with open floor 

plan. 3000 SF first floor 
space with additional 3000 

SF basement. Bustling 

Quincy Ave. location close 

to major several retailers, 

134 feet of frontage. 

OfTered at $475,000 





Thinking about selling? Now's the time! Take 
offer. List your home with Flymi & Co. and get $500 b< 
It*s like getting your own commission! Call 617-328- 



today! 



j List your home with 
I Flynn & Co. 
■ and get $500 
I cash back! 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



$mi) 



Offer expires 8/31/99 




Call 617-328-0600 



J^'im* 




Present this coupon 

at your closing 

and get a $500 rebate! 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




Daniel J. 
Flynn & Co^ be. 

^/ Check QBtoiirwcbiilc at wwwJUFLYNTiCOM ^ 



COMMERCIAL 


RESIDENTIAL 


• 


SALES 


REAL ESTATE 




AND LEASING 


37 Billings Road 




32 Chestnut Street 


Quincy. MA 02171 




Quincy, MA 02169 


Id 617J28.0600 




Id 617.479.9000 


fiui617J283871 




flu 617.770.0443 


t 


1 
1 



? 

i 



Page 16 Til* Qulnoy Sua Thursday, July 8, 1999 



Deware Funeral Home Helps 
Seniors Stay Safe, Smart 



Senior citizens can use , 
numerous tactics to avoid ? ,■ 
criminals who specialize m V*,* 
preying on them, stealing 
their hard-earned posses- 
sions, well deserved sense 
of security and sometimes 
their health or life. 

Recently over 50 local 
senior citizens leamed valu- 
able tips on personal safety, 
safety in the home and how 
to spot a scam at the SCI 
Smart & Safe Seniors event 
held at the Tobin Tower in 
Wollaston. 



The Deware Family Fu- 
neral Homes of Quincy 
joined with the Quincy 
Council on Aging to bring 
SCI Smart & Safe Seniors 
and nationally recognized 
safety expert Robert Stuber 
to Quincy. SCI Smart & 
Safe Seniors, sponsored 
nationwide by service affili- 
ates of Service Corporation 
International, provides a 
unique and comprehensive 
program to prevent exploi- 
tation and abuse. 

"The safety of senior 
citizens should concern eve- 
ryone in our community. 
We are proud to be associ- 
ated with Bob Stuber and to 




ROB STUBER, founder of SCI Smart & Safe Seniors and 
Richard Winkelman of the Deware Funeral Home with 
certificate of appreciation for conducting recent Safe Seniors 
program. 



REPORT 

STREET UGHT 

OUTAGES 

24 hours, 
7 days 

376-1490 



bring SCI Smart & Safe 
Seniors to Quincy," said 
Scott Deware of the Deware 
Funeral Homes. 

Sample lessons from the 
program included home 
invasion tips, safe ATM use 
and how to identify phone 
fraud. For example, senior 
citizens should wait a day or 
two later than usual to cash 
Social Security checks to 
avoid becoming a victim 
simply because of routine. 

During the hour long 
program Stuber asked the 
audience what they thought 
is people's perception of 

them. "Slow," "feeble- 
minded" and "weak" were 
just a few of the answers. 
"We have to challenge 



that way of thinking," Stu- 
ber said. "Senior citizens 
can be smart, and avoid be- 
ing scared. There are practi- 
cal ways to protect yourself 
every day." 

"We learned so much 
specific information on how 
we can be safe and smart," 
says Jack MacKay. "I ap- 
preciate the Deware Funeral 
Home for providing SCI 
Smart & Safe Seniors to 
give us the added advantage 
with these simple safety 
tips." 

We should all be con- 
cerned about the social 
quality and safety of com- 
munity," said Scott Deware. 
"We are proud to provide 
educational programs that 
improve our community 
life." 



Why Trust Your Memories To Anyone Else! 



H Mforir Oone On Site • 19 Years Experma 

1 Hour Photo Finishing • Photo Restoration 

• Slides From PowerPoint 
& Harvard Graphics 

• Internet Ready Photos 

• Videos Fronfi Pictures 
Slides & Movies 

• Instant Passport Photos 

PhotoQuick of Quincy . 

617-472-713t 

1363 Hancock St. Quincy Center 

Visit us at www.pholoquickquincy.com 
Hours: M-F 8:30-6pm • Sat 10-3pm 



• Same Day Slides (E-6) 

• Enlargements 

• Reprints 

• Dupe Slides 

• Slides From Prints 




William Ryan Candidate 
For Ward 1 Council Seat 



William P. Ryan of 45 
Mallard Road, an emer- 
gency medical technician, is 
running for Ward 1 coun- 
cillor. 

"The big issue is the 
hospital," said Ryan, whose 
wife is a nurse in the inten- 
sive care unit at Quincy 
Hospital. 

"Quincy has one of the 
oldest per capita populations 
in the country, and Quincy 
needs to have a hospital. If 
it can't survive on its own, it 
needs a merger," he said. 

Without a hospital in 
Quincy, residents would 
have to be sent elsewhere — 
to South Shore or Milton 
hospital or to one in Boston. 
That amount of time it 
would take to reach a hos- 
pital could be a matter of 
life and death. 

Ryan has worked with 
the emergency medical 
service in Quincy since 
1979, first with Bay State 
ambulance and most re- 
cently with Fallon Ambu- 




WILLIAM RYAN 

lance Service, which won 
the city's contract. He 
works in the company's 
communication center. 

He said another issue he 
is particularly concerned 
about is pedestrian safety, 
especially on Sea Street. 
Just this spring, he said, a 
woman was killed crossing 
the street and a child was 
struck by a vehicle and 
sustained a broken arm. 

"Traffic has really 
slowed down along Quincy 



Shore Drive, with the timed 
traffic signals," he noted, 
recommending the installa- 
tion of some more lights 
along the busy road. 

A homeowner, he sug- 
gested that more municipal 
services could be provided, 
considering the amount of 
taxes residents must pay. 
Ryan also questioned how 
much more in MWRA as- 
sessments could taxpayers 
withstand, noting that 
Quincy 's increase outdis- 
tanced surrounding commu- 
nities. 

He also noted that pro- 
viding more housing for the 
elderly and the handicapped 
needs to be addressed. 

"These are but a few of 
the issues facing us," he 
said. 

Ryan has lived in Quincy 
15 years. He is a Vietnam 
War era veteran with the 
Coast Guard. 

In addition to his wife, he 
has a 25-year-old daughter 
and two grandchildren. 



Funding In State Budget 
To Repair QSD Tide Gates 



Funding to repair the 
tide gates on Quincy Shore 
Drive was included in the 
state budget by Senator 
Michael Morrissey and 
Reps. Bruce Ayers and 
Stephen Tobin. 

The Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission owns 
tide gates some of which 
are inoperable. The tide 
gates are an essential part 
of the Cunningham Brook- 
Furnace Brook Drainage 
Project. 

"Given the nature of 
this project, all repairs, 
construction and restora- 
tion must start downstream 
at the base of Furnace 
Brook and work upstream 
to Cunningham Brook in 
Milton." said Morrissey. 

The House provided 
$250,000 in the House 
version of the Fiscal Year 
2000 Budget. The Senate 
passed a capital projects 
appropriation that included 
$250,000 for tide gates. In 
additional to the $250,000 
for the tide gates, the 
Senate approved of 



$300,000 towards the cost 
of easements on this 
project. 

"The funding of ease- 
ments is a very important 
step to move the project 
ahead to the next level," 
said Ayers. The easements 
are required to put the 
contracts out to bid on this 
project once all the 
permits are approved. 
"There are between 60 to 
70 permanent and 
construction easements 
necessary to this project. 

Tobin said, "It is 
important that the gates 
can be opened during 
heavy storms and low tide, 
gates can be opened so as 
to allow water to move 
and rain more quickly to 
the ocean," :Also during 
high tides with a severe 
storm, the gates need to be 
closed as to prevent 
additional water from 
moving upstream." 

Currently two gates are 
open by using wielded 
cabling and one is closed. 



The gates cannot change 
position without cutting 
the cabling or installing 
new cabling. The funding 
is an important first step 
towrd providing flood relief 
to hundreds of households 
in Quincy 

The Quincy legislative 
delegation said it will 
continue to work closely 
with the Milton legislative 
delegation and city 
officials, residents of this 
important project. The city 
is working with the MDC 
on an agreement to allow 
the city to operate and 
maintain the tide gates. 

"We are working and 
encouraging our col- 
leagues to fund the project 
in segments over a period 
of years," said Morrissey. 
"Securing this funding 
gives us a good start on 
moving this project 
forward." 

The House-Senate 
legislation of the legis- 
lators are hopeful monies 
to repair the tide gates will 
be appropriated. 



Our doctor sUII makes 
house calls... 




The Car Doctor 

heard every Saturday from 

9amto11amon 

1 300am WJDA! 

Tune In frcm the comfort of your 
home for the latest news from the 

automotive world...and call 

479-1 300 to get answers to your 

automotive questions! 



Thanks fbr Ustenlng. 



AM Cmr Doctor John 



1300* WJDA 

South Short Bro«dc»tting Cowpfiy 



^•^wmmm^m^ 




FoottNotes 



by Dr. Richard A Hacker 

Siaigeon-^*otBatrtst 



ATHLETE'S FOOT 

Why is this fungus called likely to get sweaty. 
Athlete's foot? Perhaps because In addition to treating 
it may be picked up in locker athlete's foot and other fungal 
room showers and floors. Also, infection, correcting your current 
a sweaty, damp foot in a dark foot problems, and relieving pain 
shoe offers the warm, moist cli- and other symptoms, your pokdia- 
mate in which fungi like to grow, trist can provide tips to help you 
This type of dermatophyte infec- avoid foot trouble down the road, 
tion is characterized by burning There's lots you can do to make 
itching, oozing, and peeling skin, sure your feet stand up to years 
Most often, the fungus needs a of wear and tear. Begin with a call 
crack OTS{dit in the skin in which to our ofiBce at 617-472-3466. \^ 
to enter. A common site is be- are coweniently located at 110 
tween the fourth and fifth toes. Wnt Sqoantum St., No. Quincy. 
To fvotect against this fHOgus, PS Some cases of athlete's 
kwp your feet clean and dry, fxH an very saAbom and hard 
minimize walking barefoot in to cure. A secondary bacterial 
public places, and wear vented ii4ectim may develop in Ae open 
shoes aod/or absorbent socks skin caus^ by Ae fungal infec- 
when you know your feet are tion. Your podiatrist can help. 



Thuraday, July 8, 1999 TIm Qulnoy Sun Page 17 



Sl^CI^TS 



NHL Championship Very Satisfying, 
Says Dallas Stars PR Director Larry Kelly 

For North Quincy 

Native, Stanley Cup 

Is ^The Ultimate' 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

North Quincy native 
Larry Kelly knows the 
downside of earning a living 
with a professional sports 
franchise. 

Playoff disappointments, 
fan apathy, being the new 
team on the block marked 
the transition of the Dallas 
Stars after the team relo- 
cated from Minnesota in 
1987. 

But six years later, Kelly, 
who has been the director of 
public relations for the Stars 
since the team arrived in 
"Big D," is now experienc- 
ing the Big "C." 

A Championship. 

The Stars defeated the 
Buffalo Sabres, 4 games to 
2, for the Stanley Cup in 
triple overtime at 1:30 a.m. 
Sunday, June 20. 

The victory climaxed the 
Stars' season-long focus on 
winning the NHL title, and 
provided some indelible 
memories for Kelly who 
grew up playing youth 
hockey and dreaming of 
being part of a champion- 
ship teanii. 

"There were very high 
expectations from the very 
beginning," Kelly said in a 
recent interview. "From the 
start of training camp, win- 
ning the Stanley Cup was 



the goal. To be able to ac- 
complish that is very satis- 
fying." 

What a difference a mere 
few years make. 

"When we first came to 
Dallas, you couldn't give 
tickets away," said Kelly 
who was assistant PR di- 
rector for the Texas Rangers 
for six years before taking 
the lead PR job for the 
Stars. 

"But when we had our 
championship parade in 
downtown Dallas the Mon- 
day after we won the Cup, 
115,000 people showed up 
to cheer us, many of them 
wearing Stars' apparel," 
Kelly said. 

Dallas is no longer just 
Cowboy Country. In the last 
three years, the team's sea- 
son ticket based has doubled 
from 6,000 to 12,000 and 
there's a waiting list for 
next year. The Stars sold out 
all but two regular season 
games and fmished the year 
with 49 straight, including 
playoffs. Besides the Stan- 
ley Cup, the team set a fran- 
chise record for victories 
(51) and points (114). 

"To me, that's one of the 
biggest things. I've been 
here since the beginning and 
to see our success is so 
gratifying. I'm very glad to 



have an opportunity to see it 
all come to fruition." 

As PR director, Kelly, a 
1981 graduate of North 
Quincy High School and 
1985 graduate of the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire, 
performs a myriad of func- 
tions, from compiling game 
notes and running the press 
box, to arranging press con- 
ferences and putting to- 
gether media guides. 

Normally, the off-season 
is down time for hockey 
teams. 

But since the Cup 
clincher, Kelly's responsi- 
bilities have swelled. 

"Normally, the summers 
are very slow during the 
day. But the last couple of 
weeks I haven't been able to 
concentrate five minutes on 
next season." 

In fact, Kelly's been on 
the go non-stop since the 
end of March as Dallas pre- 
pared for the start of the 
playoffs. His first off-day 
was last Friday when he 
flew from Dallas to Boston 
to spend time with his fam- 
ily in Quincy. 

One of new duties he's 
handling is fielding requests 
from media and setting up 
interviews with the players. 
"The phone is just ringing 
off the hook," he says. 




NORTH QUINCY NATIVE Urry KeUy, director of PubUc Relations for the DaUas SUrs, 
celebrates the team's NHL championship over the Buffalo Sabres with the coveted Stanley 
Cup. 



Kelly's used to the inter- 
view routine. But he's en- 
countering a whole different 
experience because of the 
Cup. 

Tradition calls for each 
of the players on a champi- 
onship team to have custody 
of the Stanley Cup for one 
day. The Stars are scattered 
throughout North America 
and two live overseas 
(Helsinki and Prague). Kelly 
is helping coordinate Cup 
visits with the Hall of Fame 
which never sends the Cup 



to a destination without a 
Hall escort. 

Pat Verbeek was the first 
Star player to have the Cup 
on July 3. The next day, the 
trophy traveled to northern 
Wisconsin to be with Craig 
Ludwig for a Fourth of July 
parade. Next up was a tele- 
vision appearance with 
Mike Modano. 

The Cup scheduling will 
continue throughout the 
summer. The championship 
chalice will then return to 
the Hall of Fame the first 



week of September and 
naines of the Dallas Stars 
will be engraved on the 35- 
pound Cup at the end of 
September. 

"The pay-off is winning 
the thing, I'll take that any 
day," Kelly said. "I'll take a 
nice short busy summer any 
year if it means winning the 
thing. It's a lot of work and 
a lot of traveling but it's 
definitely worth it. I'm for- 
tunate to have the job that I 
do. It's a great experience." 

(Cont'd On Page 19) 



Most Successful Year 
For Woodward Wildcats 



One Of Those Years' 
For Morrisette Legion 



By CHRIS POISSON 

TTie Morrisette American 
Legion baseball team has 
seen it all this season. 

There were the four 
straight one-run losses early 
in the season that drained 
the club emotionally. There 
was the 14-9 loss to Cohas- 
set June 22, where the 
sprinkler system would not 
shut off, leaving the club 
drenched and in the midst of 
a five-game losing streak. 

And the latest misfortune 
doused them last Friday 
against West Roxbury, 
when the lights at Adams 
Field went out in the sixth 
inning of a 4-4 game. The 
conclusion of the match up 
is scheduled for July 13 

Morrisette held a 4-2 
lead in the sixth but West 
Roxbury scored two runs to 
tie the game when heavy 
showers hit the area. 

"It's just been one of 
those years," said manager 
Ray Cattaneo. "It's been 
unbelievable." 

Morrisette (4-8) split the 
previous two games before 
Friday's power outage, 
beating Randolph, 3-1, last 
Tuesday and then losing to 
Braintree, 5-2, die foUowring 
night. 



LEGION BASEBALL 



-t 



The win against Ran- 
dolph was strictly a 
pitcher's game as Mor- 
risptte's Rob Celata out- 
dueled rival Mark Rosen, 
one of the top pitchers in the 
league. 

Celata went the distance, 
allowing five hits and no 
earned runs while fanning 
12. Rosen yielded six hits 
and one earned run in six 
innings of work. He also 
struck out 12. 

The bottom of the order 
provided the offense for 
Celata. With a 1-0 lead in 
the fourth inning, Joe Thor- 
ley, batting in the ninth spot, 
stroked a two-run single 
with two outs to give Celata 
a little bit of a cushion. 

And the runs were 
needed as Randolph later 
scored an unearned ran. 

Joe Flynn went 2 for 3 
(triple, double) with an RBI 
and Brian Walker added two 
hits. 

Matt McCann, who has 
pitched well this season 
despite his 0-4 record, 
picked up the loss against 
Braintree, .McCaAa pitcbe(} . 



seven mnmgs, giving up 
three runs on 11 hits while 
punching out seven. 

But Morrisette couldn't 
get to Braintree hurler Ryan 
Paylor. Paylor scattered 
seven hits, allowed no 
earned runs and struck out 
six. 

For Braintree, Brian Eck 
went 3 for 4 with two runs 
scored, Dave Aibrect went 2 
for 4 with two RBIs and 
Paylor chipped in with two 
hits. 

With the season winding 
down, Morrisette 's next four 
games, all this week, will 
decide its fate. It played two 
games while the paper was 
in print (Tuesday at Milton 
and yesterday against 
Quincy) and it plays Quincy 
tonight at Adams Field. 
Tomorrow Morrisette will 
take on Randolph. 

"If we can win the next 
four games we'll be even at 
8-8," Cattaneo said Monday 
afternoon. "I think probably 
from there we can make the 
playoffs. These games 
coming up arc very big." 



The. Woodward Wildcats 
finished the 1998-1999 year 
with its most successful 
athletic pcogram to date. 

The 1998-1999 athletic 
school year began with its 
inaugural varsity soccer 
season. Head coach Karen 
Schwartz, assistant coach 
Jessica Pite and the players 
dedicated their first season 
to the memory of former 
Dean of Students, Sue 
Hayes, who passed away a 
short time before the school 
year began. 

The Woodward team 
compiled a record of 8-6-1, 
which was good enough for 
a third-place finish in the 
I.G.C. Division of 
NEPSAC. Two players, 
senior captain Jessica 
Boothby and captain Dan- 
ielle Gratto, were named to 
the All-League Squad. 

The winter season intro- 
duced a new sport, junior 
varsity volleyball. Coach 
Liz Ward brought the team 
along so effectively and so 
well that volleyball is added 
to. the varsity program in the 
1999-2000 schedule year. 
The Wildcats will be play- 
ing NEPSAC teams within 
the I.G.C. and E.I.L. 

The Woodward Wildcats 
basketball season was a 
highlight film horn start to 
finish. Athletic direc- 
tor/head coach Bob Gior- 
dano, assistant coach Jessica 
Pite, assistant coach James 
Pickle and the players dedi- 
cated their, season to tbt 



memory of former Head- 
master, Robert L. Johnston. 
The Wildcats finished 
their season as undefeated 
champions of the I.G.C. and 
earned their first tournament 
bid. The team made it to the 
final four of New England 
class "D" before losing to 
Connecticut. Three players, 
senior captain Jessica 
Boothby, Audrey Fergason 
and Shante Moore, were 
named to the All-League 
I.G.C. In addition, senior 

captain Jackie O'Meara, 
Janet McNamara and Kath- 
leen Hester were named to 
the all-star squad. 

Audrey Fergason won 
the I.G.C. scoring and re- 
bounding title and went on 
to be named to the New 
England all-star team that 
played at the College of 
Holy Cross, where she dis- 
played her talents. 

Spring brought forth 
Softball. The JV squad com- 
piled a 5-0 record under 
coach Liz Ward. The varsity 



team, led by head coach 
Bob Giordano and assistant 
Liz Ward, had an outstand- 
ing year, finishing 10-1. It 
played as an independent 
against schools from the 
I.G.C, E.I.L. and I.S.L. 

For the 1999-2000 
school year. Woodward is 
offering varsity lacrosse as a 
spring sport, along with 
Softball. Jess Pite, a four- 
year college lacrosse player, 
will be head coach of the 
program. 

At graduation this year, 
four seniors were honored 
with Athletic Scholarship 
Awards by Mr. Robert 
Raymondi. 

The athletic program at 
Woodward is dedicated to 
building self-esteem, learn- 
ing life-long lessons such as 
sportsmanship, working in 
crucial situations, teamwork 
and management. Wood- 
ward is proud of what the 
student athletes have ac- 
complished is such a short 
time and is looking forward 
to the future. 



ALL STAB BASEBALL CAMP 

INSTRUaiON & HiniNG CAMPS 
AgM 6, 7, 8 Farm Laogu* 
AgM9-12 UttbLMigiM 

Ag«13 BolMRwtli 

WMkI: July12-U 

WMk2: July 19-23 

Locstioii: Eutani NsnraiM Colwga 

Banbol Co«pl«K • Qntecy 

3 B«IHii| Ca|« • 2 Baseball FitMs 

FOR INFORMATION, CAU PAUL BESTON 471-1844 




Page 18 T1&* Quinoy Sua Thunday, July 8, 1999 



Jaehnig Chiropractic 
Becoming 'Cardiac Kids' 



Triple A Playoffs Underway 



Jaehnig Chiropractic, or 
should we say the cardiac 
kids, pulled out two thrilling 
last-inning victories during 
a four-win week in recent 
Ouincy Junior Baseball 
League action. 

Here's a look at its wins: 
Jaehnig Chiropractic - 8 
South Shore Buick - 7 

Jaehnig (16-1) scored 
three runs in the last inning 
to stun Buick and win its 
11th consecutive game. 

Mike O'Mahoney and 
Nick Al Khatib (2 hits) 
sparked the comeback with 
back -to-back singles. Dave 
Jaehnig (3 hits, 3 RBIs) tri- 
pled off the left-field fence 
to tie the game and scored 
the winning run when Chris 
Marinelli (2 hits) ripped a 
single up the middle. 

John Fitzgerald had three 
hits while Mo Al Khatib and 
Matt Tobin each had two. 

Jaehnig started the game 
and fanned seven, but it was 
his little brother. Matt, who 
picked up the win as he 
struck out two of the three 
batters he faced in the last 
inning. 

John Folino took the loss 
for Buick. Folino blasted a 
home run and had a double 
for Buick 's offensive pro- 
duction. Matt Haskins also 
belted a long ball and scored 
three runs. Matt McHugh 
smashed a two-run double 
that gave Buick a short- 
lived lead. 

Jaehnig Chiropractic • 4 
Colonial Federal - 2 

Once again, Jaehnig used 
some last inning heroics as 
it scored three runs to knock 
off Colonial 

Dave Jaehnig led off the 
sixth inning with a double 
and Chris Marinelli (2 hits) 
and John Fitzgerald singled 
to load the bases. Jon 
O'Conner bunted in the ty- 
ing run on a squeeze play 
and an errant throw brought 
in two runs for the lead. 

Marinelli punched out 12 
for his second win of the 
season and Jaehnig struck 
out the side in the last in- 
ning for his third save of the 
year. 

David Djerf collected 
two hits for Colonial while 
Ray Marchaud picked up a 
tough loss on the mound. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic - 9 
Beacon Sports • 2 

Jon O'Conner allowed 
just one hit in five innings to 
run his record to 5-0 in the 
win. 

Chris Marinelli had three 



JUNIOR LEAGUE 



hits, including a line-drive 
home run, and Matt Tobin 
also had three hits (2 dou- 
bles). Dave Jaehnig legged 
out a triple and put on a 
Nomar Garciaparra-like 
performance at short stop 
with seven putouts. 

Rob Dolbec singled and 
made one of the season's 
best defensive plays with a 
running one-handed catch in 
center field. 

Dean Sandonato struck 
out 10 and had Beacon 
Sports lone hit with a tow- 
ering home run. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic • 14 
RoUry • 3 

Dave Jaehnig went 3 for 
3 with a home run and a 
double, while John Fitzger- 
ald, Mo Al Khatib, Kevin 
Donovan, Jon O'Conner and 
Nick Al Khatib had two hits 
apiece. 

James Spellman stroked 
three hits for Rotary. 
In other league action: 

Beacon Sports (11-4-1) 
defeated Rotary (11-10) 
behind strong pitching from 
Rob Baker and Joe Cafano. 

Dean Sandonato banged 
out three doubles and Eyan 
Harrington had a pair of 
hits. 

For Rotary, James 
Spellman struck out 12 bat- 
ters on the hill and had four 
hits. 

South Shore Buick -10 
Quincy Police - 2 

South Shore Buick 
picked up its 13th win of the 
season and the two-time 
defending league champion 
is looking to capture its 
third straight title under 
first-year head coach Paul 
Graham. 

Twelve-year-old John 
Folino and his strong arm 
led Buick to the win. Folino 
tossed a complete game 
with nine strikeouts, raising 
his season total to 101 in 
just nine appearances. And 
what's even more impres- 
sive is he has only walked 
seven batters. 

Folino has also been 
causing some damage at the 
plate. He's batting .455 with 
three home runs and 46 
RBIs. Folino credits former 
head coach Peter Williams, 
who drafted Folino two 
years ago and started him 
every game as a 10-year- 
old, for his success. 
Kjwanis • 15 



South Shore Buick - 9 

Mike O'Mahoney went 
deep twice and Matt Breslin 
went 3 for 4 with a home 
run to lead Kiwanis to its 
ninth win of the year. 

Dewey Donovan, Andy 
Patton, Mike Garland and 
Nick Falbo contributed of- 
fensively with two hits 
apiece. 

Billy Dwyer pitched five 
innings for the win with 
Garland picking up the save. 

Garland and Dwyer also 
played strong defensively. 
Garland turned an unas- 
sisted double play while 
Dwyer made an outstanding 
play to end the game. 

Paul Graham had three 
hits, missing the cycle by a 
home run, for Buick. John 
Folino and Matt Haskins did 
some damage with crushing 
home runs. 

Burgin-Platner Hurley - 
14 
Keohanes - 7 

Tony Pepdjonovic struck 
out eight in the win and also 
ripped a triple and two sin- 
gles. 

Jimmy Fitzpatrick had a 
triple, double and single, 
while Justin Thorley, Bobby 
Newcomb and Mike Powers 
also had three-baggers. 

Earlier in the week, 
Thorley lost his first game 
of the season against 
Jaehnig Chiropractic. 

Thorley was Pedro Mar- 
tinez-esque with 12 strike- 
outs, bringing his season 
total to 110 in only 54 in- 
nings. 

Colonial Federal - 14 
Keohanes - 3 

Colonial Federal got 
solid hitting throughout the 
batting order in the win. 

David Djerf led the way 
with a single, triple and 
three RBIs. 

Mike Giordani (triple, 2 
RBIs), Sandro Junkovic (2 
RBIs), Nicholas Malvesti (2 
hits) and Dan Reggiannini 
(double, 2 RBIs) also had 
hot bats. 

Chris Rooney pitched 
three innings for the win, 
while Reggiannini and Jeff 
Green finished out the 
game. 

Nick Devico, Jonathan 
Pelletier, Marty Rogers and 
Mark Kiesal all had hits 
Keohanes. Mike Dunbar 
played well defensively. 



The Triple A playoffs are 
under way and Quincy 
P.A.L. rebounded with a 10^ 
9 win over Yellow Cab after 
losing its first playoff game. 

Domenic "Pedro" Poli, 
coming off an undefeated 
season, struck out 14 in the 
complete-game win. 

Poli also scored the tying 
run in the bottom of the fifth 
inning as PAL rallied with 
six runs to regain the lead. 

Jason Purvcs slammed a 
three-run triple to tie the 
game and played well be- 
hind the plate. 

Danny Poggi plated Pur- 
ves with the go-ahead run 
and Steve Yovino and Alex 
Hardy added insurance runs. 

David Cordiero and John 
Grillo chipped in with two 
hits apiece. 

Brendan Clifford pitched 
a strong game for Yellow 
Cab with six strikeouts. 

Justin Boyd went 4 for 4 
with doubles, and Robbie 
Mann added two hits and a 
run scored. 

In other action: 
Yellow Cab ' 11 
Local 2222 • 3 

Yellow Cab opened up 
the post-season with a win 
as Brendan Clifford tossed a 
complete-game, 12-strikeout 
performance, scattering just 
five hits. 

Mark Pepjonovich scored 
two runs and turned an un- 
assisted double play. 

Bryan Donelin sealed the 
win in the sixth inning when 
he stroked a two-run double, 
scoring Mike Saville and 
Joe Ceurvals. 



Paul Farina, Chris 
Teimey and Matt Palmer 
had hits for Local 2222. 
C.NA. - 10 
Quincy PA.L. - 3 

Steve O'Neil fanned 12 
in a complete-game effort as 
CNA won a playoff game. 
O'Neil got things going 
with a leadotf home run. 

Keilan Losi crushed a 
three-run homer and also 
doubled and scored twice to 
lead the offense. 

Ricky Likas had two hits 
and scored three runs and 
Kyle Costa added three hits. 

Jason Purves struck out 
12 despite getting the loss. 
He also had two hits. 

Dave Cordiero tripled 
and scored, while Bobby 
Harrington made three great 
grabs in centerfield. 
Local 2222 • 8 
Consumer Home Mort- 
gage - 2 

Paul Farina allowed two 
hits as Local 2222 elimi- 
nated CHM ft-om the playoff 
hunt. 

Alex Tringale had three 
hits and Robbie Gardiner 
and Todd Schofield added 
two hits apiece. 

Ben Kelleher, John 
Hanlon and Brian Sorensen 
had hits for CHM. 
CNA - 5 
Locker Room - 3 

Justin Perkus and Steve 
Graham pitched three strong 
innings apiece in the win. 

Keilan Losi had three 
hits and scored a run, 
Rickey Likas had a double 
and played well at the hot 
comer and Steve O'Neil had 



a hit, run scored and played 
well behind the plate. 

For Locker Room, Mi- 
chael Brondige had two hits 
and a run scored. Shawn 
McBrien added a hit. 
CNA- 21 
Flavin & Flavin • 4 

C.N.A displayed some 
fireworks in its foial regular 
season game. 

Keilan Losi had three 
singles, a home mn and 
scored four runs to lead the 
attack. 

Rickey Likas (three hitsX 
Kyle Costa (three hits) and 
Jeff Hague (two hits) also 
contributed offensively. 

Jonathan Griffith had a 
good game for Flavin & 
Flavin. Andrew Potter and 
Scott Richards each had 
doubles. 

CNA- 11 

Consumer Home Mort* 

gage -3 

CNA scored eight runs in 
the final two innings to 
knock off CHM. 

Chris Garvey led the way 
with a 14-strikeout perform- 
ance and also had a single 
and double. 

Steve O'Neil tripled, had 
two doubles and scored 
three runs, and Kyle Costa 
banged out three hits to 
back up Garvey 's pitching 
effort. 

Brian Sorenson tripled 
for CHM and stmck out 
nine from the mound. 
Jimmy Vey also played 
well. 

Quincy PA.L. - 10 
Yellow Cab -9 



In Memory Of Mike Therrien 

Theresa Jones Running 
In Dublin Marathon 



Theresa Jones of Quincy 
is running the Dublin 
Marathon on Oct. 25 to raise 
money for the Leukemia 
Society of America. 

The Leukemia Society's 
Team In Training program 
trains people of all athletic 
ability to participate in a 
marathon, century ride, in 
line skate or a triathlon. 

In 1998, the Team In 
Training program raised $50 
million nationwide. As of 
April 1998, the Massachu- 
setts chapter raised over 



three million dollars helping 
to support the research, pa- 
tient aid and education pro- 
grams of the Massachusetts 
chapter. 

Jones is running the 
Dublin Marathon in mem- 
ory of Michael Therrien. 
Therrien lost his battle with 
cancer on May 30, 1999. He 
was 40 years old when he 
died and he left behind his 
wife and four young chil- 
dren. 

As of June 30, Jones has 
raised over $3,500 for the 



Leukemia Society. All the 
funds raised will help the 
Leukemia Society's mis- 
sion: dedicated to curing 
leukemia, lymphoma, 
Hodgkin's disease and 
myeloma and improving the 
quality of life for patients 
and their families. 

To make a donation, 
make checks payable to: 
The Leukemia Society of 
America and send to 
Theresa Jones, 75 Greene 
Street, Quincy, MA 02170. 



South Shore Habitat 
Golf Classic Sept. 28 



Matthew Joyce To Compete 
In U.S. Scholar-Athlete Games 



Matthew Joyce of 
Quincy has been selected to 
participate in the inaugural 
United States Scholar- 
Athlete games this June. 

A sophomore honors 
student at Boston College 
High School, Joyce, 16, will 
partake in the soccer com- 
ponent of the Games. 

Joyce has been playing 
soccer for eight years and is 
a member of the varsity 
team at B.C. High. In his 
spare time he has partici- 
pated in various community 



service projects. 

Over 1,600 scholar- 
athletes and scholar-fine 
artists representing all 50 
states are expected to par- 
ticipate in the United States 
Scholar-Athlete Games, 
which will take place from 
June 26 - July 2 at the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island and 
in Newport, R.I. 

Administered by the In- 
ternational Sport, the 1999 
U.S. Games will continue 
the Scholar-Athlete Games 
tradition, which was 



launched in 1993 with the 
first World Scholar-Athlete 
Games. The U.S. Games 
will bring the Institute one 
step closer to achieving its 
goal of hosting Scholar- 
Athlete Games on every 
continent. 

Scholar-athletes may 
participate in one of thirteen 
sports programs including 
baseball, basketball, chess, 
field hockey, golf, lacrosse, 
rugby, soccer, softball, 
swimming, tennis, track & 
field and volleyball. . 



The South Shore Habitat 
for Humanity Golf Classic 
will be held Tuesday, Sept. 
28 at the 18-hoIe Ridder 
Country Club course in 
Whitman. 

Proceeds will benefit 
current and future South 
Shore Habitat building proj- 
ects. 

The Florida-style best 
ball tournament begins at 
7:30 a.m. with a shotgun 



start. Cost is $125 per indi- 
vidual/$500 per foursome; 
that includes greens fees, 
shared cart, giveaways and a 
roast beef luncheon. 

The first player to score a 
hole-in-one on the desig- 
nated hole wins a 2000 
Dodge Neon, courtesy of 
Weber Dodge in Hingham. 
Other prizes will also be 
given out following the 
toumament. 



To facilitate play, the 
toumament is limited to 40 
teams. Golfers can call for a 
registration packet. 

Corporate sponsorships 
and donations of auction 
items are also needed. For 
information on fees, partici- 
pation or sponsorship, con- 
tact South Shore Habitat for 
Humanity, 28 River St., 
Braintree or call 781-843- 
9080. 



Jalinette Jimenez Graduates City Year 



Jalinette Jimenez re 
cently completed a year of 
service with City Year 
Boston. 

Jimenez was one of 



ates who recently completed 
1,700 hours of service in 
Boston schools, ommiunity 
centers. City Year camps 
and after-school programs, 
neariy 200 City Year gradu- They have taught an 



HIV/AIDS and domestic 
violence curriculum, reno- 
vated numerous play- 
grounds and improved sen- 
ior citizens' hoines through- 
out the past year. 



Thtmday, Jii^>,lf>» Tli^QiiliMqr 



19 



Thomas Reid Wins Medals 
At Nat'l Wheelchair Games 



Thomas Reid, a disabled 
Army veteran from Quincy, 
competed in the 19th Na- 
tional Veterans Wheelchair 
Games held June 21-26 in 
Puerto Rico. 

The Held of more than 
600 athletes from 40 states, 
Puerto Rico and Great Brit- 
ain makes this the largest 
annual wheelchair sports 
event in the United States. 

All athletes are military 
veterans who use wheel- 
chairs due to spinal cord 
impairment, certain neuro- 
logical conditions, orthope- 
dic amputations or other 
disabilities. 

Reid, 29, is a quadriple- 
gic. He is currently receiv- 
ing care at the VA medical 
facility in West Roxbury. 

Reid took the silver med- 
als in track 400, 200 and 
100 meters events. He also 
earned the silver in quad 
rugby and finished fourth in 
table tennis. 

"It's good to be with 
fellow veterans with dis- 
abilities," said Reid, who 
has participated in this event 
for the past four years. 
"They're in the same boat as 
you are. It's a good learning 
experience. You learn eve- 
ryday things as well as 





THOMAS REID 



sports. 

"It's good camaraderie, 
yet at the same time, people 
give 100 percent. Unlike 
other sporting events, if you 
lose people are graceful." 

Athletes in the Games 
compete within three divi- 
sions - masters (over age 
40), novice (first-time com- 
petitors in wheelchair 
sports) and open (all others 
or those who choose to 
compete in this category 
instead of masters or nov- 
ice). 



They also compete 
within classes according to 
the level of their physical 
ability, with three quadri- 
plegic-level classes and four 
paraplegic-level or amputee 
classes. Reid competed as a 
Class lA in the Open Divi- 
sion. 

The Games are presented 
by the U.S. Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA) and 
the Paralyzed Veterans of 
America, and was hosted 
this year by the San Juan 
VA Medical Center. 



DALLAS STARS Public Relations Director Larry Kelly (second from right) and lib brothers 
(from left) Shaun, Steven and Kevin, hold the Stanley Cup in the Quincy home of their 
parents, Larry Sr. and Joanne. 

For North Quincy Native, 
Stanley Cup 'The Ultimate' 



Brian Doyle On Prep School 
All-State, Conference Teams 



Brian Doyle, son of John 
and Janet Doyle of Wollas- 
ton, recently finished a suc- 
cessful basketball season at 
the Portsmouth Abbey Prep 
School in Rhode Island. 

The 6'3" junior was se- 
lected 3rd Team All-State 
and named to the All- 
Southeast New England 
Conference Team. 

As the starting shooting 
guard, Doyle averaged 18.6 
points, 6 rebounds and 5 
assists per game. During the 
week of Feb. 14th, he was 
selected Newport County 
athlete of the week after 
scoring 28 points against 
arch-rival St. Georges. 

The Abbey finished with 
a 14-9 record after losing to 
Noble & Greenough 67-66 
in the New England Class C 
Championship game. 

Doyle also plays first- 
base and leftHeld for the 
Abbey baseball team. He's 
currently batting .428 and 
leading the Ravens in RBI's 
and runs scored. 

Next year as a senior, 
Doyle has been named a 
three-sport captain in cross- 
country, basketball and 
baseball. 

Brian is also a dorm rep- 
resentative and is a member 
of his Student Council. 
During the summer he 




BRIAN DOYLE 

works for the Quincy Rec- Brian is presently unde- 
reation Department. Last cided on his college plans 
summer he was a recreation but is weighing many op- 
leader at the Squantum tions. 
playground. 



Ryan Ackerman Graduates St. Michael's College 

Ryan William Ackerman Ackerman, the son of bachelor's degree in English 

of Quincy recently gradu- Donna and Christopher literature. He is a graduate 

ated from St. Michael's Ackerman, received a of Boston College High 

CoUege. School. 

Richard Lavery On Honors Dean's list 



Richard H. Lavery, son ors Dean's List at the Uni- 

of Mr. and Mr. Richard versity of Massachusetts in 

Lavery of North Quincy, Boston for the spring se- 
has been named to the Hon- 



mester. 

Lavery is an English 
major. 



(Com 'd From Page 1 7) 
After the engraving, the 
silver trophy will make a 
triumphant return to Dallas 
for the Stars' homeopener 
Friday, Oct. 1 when the 
championship banner is 
raised and rings are distrib- 
uted. 

"That'll be another layer 
of gratification when we get 
our rings in the fall," Kelly 
beams. 

This championship sea- 
son has already provided 
some life-long memories for 
Kelly. 

liie deciding Game 6 is 
full of them, Kelly explains. 
"The whole game was a 
roller coaster of emotions. 
When we got to overtime, 
you knew one shot -- like 
off a deflection -- could win 
the game for you or lose the 
game for you. We had a 3- 
overtime game earlier in the 
playoffs. Our guys were 
pretty .confident that we 
could vfin it. 

"At 'the start of the over- 
time, I was sitting in our 
locker room with some of 
the guys on the team who 
weren't suited up for the 
game. When we saw the 
winning goal on TV, we 
started yelling and scream- 
ing. I ran out onto the ice to 
coordinate interviews with 
ESPN and the Canadian 
broadcast network. 

"It was so late -- adrena- 
line kept you going. I'm in 
the locker room trying to 
work and celebrate at the 
same time. It was probably 
the most nerve-wracking 
experience I've ever had, 
including the births of my 
two kids." 

Larry's wife, Nanette, 
could concur. She was one 
of 110 Dallas Stars staff and 
spouses who flew to Buffalo 
for the final game in a 
charter arranged by the 
club's owner. One of 
Larry's brotfiers, Kevin, was 
also in attendance. 

As the celebration spilled 
out over the ice at Buffalo's 
Marine Midland Arena and 
players awaited the Cup 
presentation, Kelly noticed 
Modano, who had been on 
the ice for Brett Hull's win- 
ning goal, was strikingly 
alone. 

'^(Mike's) standing near 



the boards, ripping the cast 
off his broken wrist. He's so 
relieved that he's crying," 
Kelly said. "I approach him 
and say, 'Mo, you deserve 
this more than anyone on 
the team.' 

"He just said thanks." 
Kelly knows first-hand 
what Modano has endured. 
He's one of three players 
who kre still on team after it 
moved from Minnesota six 
years ago. 

"He's had to deal with a 
lot of b.s. over the years. 
He's been called too soft 
and too much of a one-way 
(offensive) player. He's 
(developed into one of the 
best two-way players in the 
NHL," Kelly said. 

"I jotted down some 
notes about the whole expe- 
rience. I intend to put to- 
gether a journal of what 
happened that night. Seeing 
Modano on the ice like that 
is one of the things I'll al- 
ways remember." 

Another moment of glory 
came minutes later when 
Kelly hoisted hockey's holy 
grail high over his head in 
celebration. 

"It's something you 
dream about ~ holding the 
Stanley Cup," said Kelly, 
who can vividly recall 
Johnny Bucyk circling the 
Boston Garden with the 
same Cup after Bobby Orr's 
title-winning score in 1970. 
"It's an unbelievable 
feeling to be able to be out 
on the ice with the team that 
just won it. It's the uhimate 
feeling." 

The Stars' celebration 
continued in the Buffalo 
arena until about 4:30 a.m. 
The team's flight for Dallas 
departed at 4:45 a.m. 

"On the flight home, I 
could stop and reflect on 
what had happened. I was 
almost pinching myself. 
You want to be the team left 
standing in June. . . I work 
with these players everyday. 
They're a great bunch of 
guys. To be able to share it 
with these guys is even 
more gratifying.** 

Kelly has also provided 
some golden moments for 
family and local hockey 
ftms. 

On Friday, June 25, 
Kelly headed east for the 



NHL entry draft in Boston's 
FleetCenter held the next 
day. Kelly was going to 
spend the night in Quincy at 
his parents' house. The Cup 
was headed to Boston, too, 
for the draft. By sheer coin- 
cidence, the Hall of Fame 
offered Kelly custody of the 
Cup for Friday night given 
Boston's close proximity to 
Quincy. 

Kelly eagerly accepted 
the invitation and contacted 
his brother, Kevin, who met 
Larry at the airport. To- 
gether they picked up the 
Cup stored in a plan, incon- 
spicuous blue trunk at a 
Boston hotel where the Hall 
of Fame escort was staying. 

They arrived at the home 
of their parents, dad Larry, 
Sr. and mom Joanne. Kevin 
walked in first. Larry filed 
in behind him carrying the 
Cup. 

"It pretty much shocked 
everybody. I didn't tell any- 
one I was coming home 
with the Cup." 

After a photo-op at the 
Kelly house, Larry took the 
Cup to Malachy's Saloon, a 
Quincy Center watering 
spot owned by a buddy, 
Steve Higgins. "There must 
have been a couple of hun- 
dred people there that night, 
and 50 of them had cameras. 
I laid down some ground 
rules ~ like no picking the 
Cup up " and for over two 
hours people had their pic- 
ture taken with it. 

"It's such a magnet. It 
draws people to it. A lot of 
people wanted to see the 
names of the 1970 and 1972 
Bruins' teams inscribed on 
the Cup. To be able to share 
it with people was very 
gratifying," Kelly said, 
noting it may have been the 
Cup's first visit to the City 
of Presidents. 

Kelly, and many other 
local hockey fans, Ik^ it's 
not the last. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



..*' 



Bi 



■I 



■■■ 



■i 



Page 20 Thm Quiney Buxk Thuraday, July 8, 1999 




cr 



^SMI^^R^m^M^ 



It's Not Just The Heat, It's The Ozone 



By LAUREN LISS 

When the temperature 
rises, it can make all of us 
run for the cover of shade. 
For some of us, however -- 
particularly the elderly, 
children, and people with 
respiratory diseases -- hot 
summer weather brings with 
it more than discomfort. But 
it isn't the heat or humidity. 

It's the ozone. High in 
the atmosphere, ozone pro- 



tects us all from the sun's 
deadly ultraviolet radiation. 
Closer to the ground, how- 
ever, ozone is harmful to 
people because it directly 
affects lung function. 

People with asthma or 
other respiratory diseases 
feel the effects most. When 
ground level ozone readings 
are high it drives thousands 
of Massachusetts residents 
into hospital emergency 




Dana Smith, D.PM and George J. Ducach, D.P.M 
Surgeons-Podiatrists 

FROM THE WORLD OF RESEARCH 



Podiatrists, like other medi- 
cal specialists, sometimes deal 
with difficult conditions like 
pesky fractures (broken bones) 
that are difficult to heal. The frac- 
ture could be a resuh of an in- 
jury or from a surgical procedure 
such as the attempted correction 
of a Bunion. There are some 
tools doctors have to try to heal 
these difficult fractures. These 
include putting the patient in a 
cast and using electrical bone 
stimulators. However, would it 
not be nice if a "magic" pill was 
available to help grow new bone 
and heal these pesky fractures? 

A biotechnology company in 
Seattle, ZymoGenetics Incorpo- 
rated, is currently testing three 
compounds that qualify as that 
"magic" pill. The compounds ap- 
pear to have the ability to stimu- 



late bone morphogenic proteins 
(BMPs). These proteins influ- 
ence osteoblasts (bone forming 
cells) to make new bone. The 
good thing is that the three com- 
pounds are small enough to be 
put into a pill form. Immediately 
two important applications be- 
come apparent: healing of frac- 
tures and osteoporosis (loss of 
bone mass due to aging). The 
medical community will be 
looking forward to the outcome 
of this exciting area of research. 

// you are having any foot 
problems, call and schedule an 
appointment at (617) 773-4300. 
We are located at 1261 Furnace 
Brook Pkwy., Suite #18, Quincy 
and are affiliated with Carney, 
Quincy and South Shore Hospi- 
tals. 



rooms. In fact, according to 
the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency, as many 
as 20 percent of all sum- 
mertime respiratory-related 
hospital visits in the North- 
east are due to ground level 
ozone pollution. 

Children and seniors are 
also seriously affected. Kids 
are the greatest risk from air 
pollution because they 

breathe in far more in rela- 
tion to body weight than 
adults. They are also more 
apt to engage is strenuous 
play on hot summer days 
when ozone levels are high- 
est. Seniors are at signifi- 
cant risk as well because as 
we age our bodies lose res- 
piratory defense mecha- 
nisms. 

Although ground level 
ozone occurs naturally in 
small amounts, the levels 
that can affect public health 
are a direct result of man- 
made air pollution. Harmful 
chemicals emitted from 
cars, trucks, buses, industry 
and other sources react with 
heat and sunlight to create 



Quit Smoking< 



ground level ozone. 

Most of the time, air 
quality in Massachusetts is 
pretty good, and it's been 
improving steadily in recent 
years as government, indus- 
try and consumers work 
together to reduce air emis- 
sions. But on hot summer 
days, the amount of ground 
level ozone can increase 
dramatically, and we all feel 
its effects. 

In early June, Massachu- 
setts endured several days 
when ozone levels were 
extremely high. Throughout 
the state, in addition to the 
blistering heat, people felt 
irritation to their lungs, eyes 
and noses. Those who suffer 
from asthma experienced 
incidents of acute respira- 
tory episodes. 

There's an economic 
impact, too. Whenever 
ozone levels are high, we 
see increased employee sick 
days and school absences, 
as well as a loss of produc- 
tion in the workplace. 

The good news is that we 
can predict those "bad air" 
days, and people can take 
precautions to limit the 
health effects of ozone in 
the air. The Department of 
Environmental Protection 



(DEP) continually monitors 
air quality in Massachusetts 
and makes the information 
available to the public 
throuehout the summer 
ozone season. Each day, we 
release information about 
the current and following 
day's air quality. 

This Daily Air Quality 
Report is available to Mas- 
sachusetts Residents by 
calling the toll-free Air 
Quality Hotline at 1-800- 
882-1497, or by visiting our 

Web site at 

www.state.ma.us/dep. Our 
air quality experts rate the 
air quality as being "good," 
"moderate" or "unhealthy," 
and recommend specific 
health precautions for each 
level. 

Even at "moderate" lev- 
els, people with heart or 
lung ailments should con- 
sider limiting outdoor ac- 
tivities during the afternoon 
and evening hours when 
ozone levels are highest. 
When air quality is deemed 
"unhealthy," everyone 
should avoid any strenuous 
activity during those hours. 
If you experience any respi- 
ratory symptoms — such as 
coughing, throat irritation. 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 







J-^eace of If 1/ llnd 

Face & Body Spa 

Massage Therapy • Facials 

• Manicures • Pedicures 

• Waxing • Electrolysis 

• Make-up Application j^^^^^ Cellex-C 
587 HANCOCK STREET, NORTH QUINCY • 617-773-8882=*' 




I Back -n- Body I 

! MASSAGE THERAPY i 

Y^ $39 ^1 

B One hour session with this coupon. Expires 7/3 1/99 _ 

I 8 16 Washington St., Braintree, MA 02 1 84 | 
I (781)843-2024 I 



chest pain, or shortness of 
breath - you should con- 
sider consulting your doctor. 

Since ground level ozone 
is the result of air pollution, 
there are things we can all 
do to help reduce it. Keep- 
ing motor vehicles well- 
maintained is among the 
most effective methods of 
reducing air pollution. A 
well-maintained car not 
only bums less fuel, but it 
also runs more cleanly and 
efficiently. Getting your car 
checked for vapor leaks, 
keeping tires properly in- 
flated, and regularly re- 
placing your oil are effec- 
tive ways to do your part for 
cleaner air in Massachusetts. 

On days when ground 
level ozone is high, avoid 
refueling your vehicle in the 
daytime or better yet - take 
public transportation. If you 
must refuel, do so after dark 
to avoid evaporation and 
don't "top off your gas 
tank. It also helps to avoid 
using lighter fluid on char- 
coal grills or oil-based 
paints or solvents. Postpone 
using gasoline-powered 
lawn mowers or garden 

equipment until the air 
quality has improved. 

It's been a hot summer, 
thus far - and it has only 
just begun. The next time 
you hear someone say, "It's 
not the heat, it's the humid- 
ity," remember: It's also the 
ozone. Being aware of its 
effects and how to counter 
them should help us all 
breath easier. 

(Lauren Liss is the com- 
missioner of the Massachu- 
setts Department of Envi- 
ronmental Protection). 



Children Adults 

Teens Ul.J\ Families 

Robert Azrak, Ed.D., FA.C0.P. 

Licensed Psychologist 

Mass Bay Counseling, 1 Billings Rd., North Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 
www.inergy.com/RAzrakPsychology 




NEW WEIGHT LOSS MEDICATION 



XENICAL 



® 



Call for information or 
to schedule an appointment. 



covered by some insurances 




Located In the Granite naza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Granite Street, Braintree, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVID 8: EGILBJAN, MP, MPH, BgEDICAL DIRECTOR 



A/^£ yoi/ Ar i^fSK 

fOR IVMe Of3£AS£? 

LYMEriX". 

Lyme Disease Vaccine 

Now A\)ai\Qb\e at 



Covered by most insurances 




Located In the Granite Plaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Granite Street, Braintree, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVm 8. EGIUfAN, MD, BfPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



■ «'««»«»'«»«'.%H*. P. 



««*••«*««»* 



Tliiinday,July8,1999 TIm Qulnoy Sun Page 21 



\\ 



QUINCY'S GERALD SHEEHAN, with his wife AUce, was 
recently awarded the Protestant Guild for Human Services 
highest honor at a reception at Symphony Hall in Boston. 

Gerald Sheehan 

Receives Protestant 

Guild Award 



Gerald Sheehan of 
Quincy was recently hon- 
ored by The Protestant 
Guild for Human Services, 
Inc., a Waltham-based hu- 
man services organization, 
as the recipient of the 1999 
Rev. Andrew G. Rosenber- 
ger Award during a recep- 
tion at Symphony Hall in 
Boston. 

The award, named for the 
organization's long-time 
chairman and trustee, is 
given annually to a student 
and employee who best ex- 
emplify the organization's 
mission of providing high 
quality human services for 
persons with special needs. 

Sheehan, the Guild's 
manager of facilities and 
equipment, has worked at 
the Guild for the past 10 
years. He is responsible for 
the upkeep and repair of the 
Guild's seven student resi- 
dences, its main school and 
office building in Waltham, 
its 20 vehicles and a variety 
of furnishings, equipment 
and appliances. 

Edmund Hagerty, the 
Protestant Guild's executive 
director, said Sheehan has 
demonstrated all of the 
award criteria during the 
past 10 years. 

"Jerry is a dedicated pro- 
fessional ■ who is always 
willing to go the extra mile 
for the students and staff at 
The Learning Center. More 
so, he takes pride in main- 
taining all our facilities to 
the high standards that we 



demand and that our stu- 
dents deserve. His commit- 
ment to our mission makes 
my job easier and helps 
provide a safe, home-like 
environment for our stu- 
dents." 

A delighted Sheehan said 
he was surprised by the 
honor. 

"It's wonderful to be 
recognized by your col- 
leagues, but I've got to ad- 
mit I was a little shocked," 
Sheehan said. "The reason I 
started working here 10 
years ago was because I was 
so impressed by the work 
the Guild does, and by the 
people who work there. Ten 
years later I'm still im- 
pressed. Now, to be a part of 
that~and to be recognized- 
is very rewarding." 

This year's presentation 
took place at Symphony 
Hall, where guests and sup- 
porters also enjoyed dinner 
and a performance by the 
Boston Pops Orchestra. 

The Protestant Guild for 
Human Services, Inc. is a 
Waltham-based human 
service organization dedi- 
cated to providing high 
quality services for persons 
with special needs. The 
Guild's Learning Center, 
located at 4! Waverly 
Oaks Rd., is a ir-round 
approved private school that 
serves children, adolescents 
and young adults with a 
wide range of developmen- 
tal disabilities. 



First Presbyterian 



Sunday activities at 
First Presbyterian Church, 
270 Franklin St. begin with 
Sunday School at 8:30 and 
worship service at 9:30 
a.m. Pastor Stan Johnson 
will give the sermon. A 
children's sermon will 
correlate with the pastor's 
message. 

Wednesday Night 
magic was scheduled to be 
held yesterday (Wed- 
nesday) at 6:30 p.m. and 
will be held for five 
consecutive Wednesday 
nights ending on July 28. It 
will start with a casual 
meal together followed bv 



a variety of activities. 

Vacation Bible School 
will be July 26-30 from 9 
a.m. to 12 noon. The 
church is wheelchair 
accessible and child care 
is provided. Young Sang 
Korean Church will meet 
at 12:30 p.m . 



Give. 



American Heart 
AssodatioiiJ 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UFE 







K^ELieiCN 




Bethany Congregational 



United Methodist 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., Quincy 
Center, will have Morning 
Worship on Sunday 
beginning at 10 a.m. 

Rev. William Harding, 
pastor, will preach on "The 
Right Attitude." The 
Lemonade in the Shade 
Summer Church School 
will meet at the same 
time. 

Scripture Reader will 
be Jean Bettinson. Music 
for the service will b£ 
provided by Shirley Pyne, 
soprano and Thomas 
Boyer, organist. 



Greeters will be Gloria 
Holbrook and Betty 
Newton. 

A Fellowship Hour with 
light refreshments will be 
held in Allen Parlor 
following the worship 
service. 

The second in the series 
of Mid-Week Concerts 
will be held on 
Wednesday, July 14 at 
12:15 p.m. Artists will be 
Tamara Rozek 
harpsicord and Owen 
Watkins -- recorder. 

Admission to the 
concerts is free. 



Daniel Bollen will be 
the guest speaker at the 10 
a.m. worship service at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Assisting as a liturgist 
will be Cathy Emerson. 
Shirley Poore will be the 
greeter and will usher with 



Anna Giger. The coffee 
hour will be hosted by 
Sybil Whyte, Linada 
Conant and Pat Potter. 

During the July and 
August services, the music 
director. Pen McDonald 
will present short mono- 
logues on the musical 
history of church hymns. 



Union Congregational 



Pastor John Swanson 
will preach on the book of 
Romans at the 10 a.m. wor- 
ship service Sunday at Un- 
ion Congregational Church, 
136 Rawson Rd., Wollaston. 

Lay Reader will be Alice 



Libby and the greeters will 
be Alice Libby and Robert 
Boussy. 

Union Congregational 
has adopted a more relaxed 
service for the summer. 
Casual dress is welcome. 



(putney ^cluntnu ^ix*ccttiry 



SliRVICES & ACTIVITIES 



Assemblies of God 

Tidin gs 

158 Wishinfflon i^t.TQuincy 

phone: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory E. Wheaton, Butor 

Summer Worship 

Schedule Sunday, 10am 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A«Contemporary Worship 
■I •Marriage & Fanriily Group 
■I •International Fellowship 
^ ^, •DIvorceCare 

Catholic 

Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

Masses: 
Saturday 4:30PM 
Sunday 9AM & 1 1AM 
Daily Mass 9AM .* 



Church Of St. John 
The Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7. 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

Handicapped Accessible 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30.10, 11:30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air condittoned 

Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman CatttolK Community Wiping together 

m Faith, Worship, Educatior\ and Sennce' 

386 HMtcock St. North Quincy, MA 02171 

(817)32»«66 

Sunday Mass** 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am. 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with CtK)ir) 12 noon ani 5pm 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sai. 9am 

Ha ndlcafiped Aoc«t$il^ 

ConfMSiofM 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Ontory 



Catholic 

STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptism, 2nd Sunday. IV.^SAM 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock Street Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Thomas Keane 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11 :00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



Congregational 



HOUGHS NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue, Quincy 

'Where The Star Of Love Shines" 

Services of Worship 

9:30am 

Wheelchair accessible 
Air conditioned 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

10AM Sunday Worship 

Church School with Child Care Provided 

•Different Paths' 

Communion Sunday 

Rev. Cherie Daniel Assoc. Pas tor 

UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach Street & Rawson Rd.. Wollaston 

479-6661 

Rev. John Carl Swanson, pastor 

Sunday Worship 10AM 

'Paul's Letters to the Romans' 



Episcopal 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 
Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 

Rev. Claude Smith 

Sunday Worship 

9:30am 

Morning Prayer with 

Sermon and Eucharist 

Child care provided 

Everybody Welcome 
Thrift Shop Closed for the Summer 




TO ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE CALL 471-3100 



Congregational 

BETHANY 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner of Spear i Coddington Sts., 

Quincy Center •4797300 

10am Worship 

Lemonade In The Shade Church School 

Rev. William Harding 

'The Right Attitude' 

Foursquare Gospel 
The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Corner of Newbury Ave. & 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy • 847-4444 

Guest speaker Rev. Tim Connerty 

Neightx>rhood Park Picnic 

Sun., July 1 1-end of Sagamore St., N.Q. 

Methodist 



<r 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

773-3319 

Sunday Worship 10AM 

Daniel Bollen, guest speaker 

Nazarene 

Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston. 472-5669 
Dr. Ru$$tH F. UttCMlft, Jr., Sfikn Putor 

Rn. Samuel Clfung: Pa$tor 
Quincy Ctuntu Ct)urch of ttm Natarmie 

Sunday Services, 8:45am Holy Communion 

9:30am Cantonese Worship (Angell Chapel) 

9.45am Christian Educatxxi (all ages) 

1 1am Morning Worship Celebration 

* Nursery Care and Children's Church through grade 4 

6pm Evening Service (contemporary) 

The Wollaslon CtHJich of the Nizarene is 

air conditioned arxiwheelchakacc^sitile. 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

Protestant 

THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

1 1AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spiritualist 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 WostSt, Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Sendee Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. Berkowitz. C.H..C.M. 




TO ADVERTISE 
IN THIS 
DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE 
CALL 
471-3100 



Page 22 T1&* Quiaosr Sua Hmnday, July 1, 1999 



CCITLIAI^IES 



James A. Gibson 

Past Master Of Masonic Lodge 



Stephen J. Lynch, 84 

Journalist, Travel Reporter 



Dorothy G. Clay worth, 74 

Retired Teacher's Aide 



A funeral service for 
James Albert Gibson of 
Quincy, past master of the 
West Roxbury-Dorchester 
Masonic Lodge, was held 
July 2 at the Deware Fu- 
neral Home, 576 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Mr. Gibson died June 29 
at home following a long 
illness. 

Bom in Boston, he was a 
graduate of Northeastern 
University. 



He served in the Army 
during the Korean War. 



A funeral Mass for Ste- 
phen J. Lynch, 84, of 
Quincy, a retired journalist, 
was celebrated July 1 at St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 



He was a member of the 
Aleppo Temple Shriners in 
Wilmington, the Quincy 
Commandery Knights Tem- ^^ Q^jn "/Hosphal 
plar, St. Stephen s Royal ' ^ 

Arch Lodge, Taleb Grotto 
and the 3-5-7 Club. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Jean (Leiih) Gibson; 
and a brother, George Gib- 
son of Quincy. 

Burial was private. 



survived by two daughters, 
Joan L. Dcvine of Wash- 
ington, and Susan L. Ohison 
of Calif.; a brother, Robert 
Lynch of Needham; five 



Mr. Lynch died June 27 grandchildren and five 

great-grandchildren. 



y ■ 

SCOTT DEWARE 
uncertainty and fe 
'where are we goin 
about ourselves an 
ing has always bi 
characteristic. Wl 
gripped with unci 
tion we are bound 
that it is better tot 
at all? Couldn't it 
us only because w« 
true whether it ap 
ence and religion. 
Obviously then, 
increase faith. Sou 

Deware Fai 

Serving All 

Wollaston Cha] 
576 Hancock Str 
Quincy, MA 021 

^ Affor! 

Advanced Plannin 
Services R 


A ThoughP 
for The Week 


How often do you doubt some- 
thing you hear? How often do 
you have doubts about your abili- 
ties or have doubts about the 
abilities of others? Many people 
today flounder in a mire of doubt, 
ar about 'how things are going' - 
g' - ... We all have doubts at times 
id others. It is only human. Doubt- 
>en and will always be a human 
len in maturity we find ourselves 
irtainty or struggling in despera- 
to have doubts. Couldn't it be said 
lave honest doubts than no doubts 
be said that some doubts torment 
\ have too little faith and this holds 
iplies to doubts about people, sci- 

the best way to reduce doubts is to 
mds simple. It is. 

mily Funeral Homes 

Faiths <Si Nationalities 

jel Hannel Chapel 
eet 86 Copeland Street 
70 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

L7) 472-1137 

jability Plus Service 

g • Cremation Service Available 

endered To Any Distance 



He was a refwrter, travel 
editor and promotions man- 
ager during his 40 years at 
the Boston Herald. He re- 
tired from the paper in 1977. 

Born in Boston, he had 
lived in Quincy for the last 
50 years. 

Husband of the late Rita 
(Baggessen) Lynch, he is 



02118. 

Florence G. Larracey 

Retired Registered Nurse 



A funeral Mass for Do- 
rothy G. (DeGust) Clay- 
worth, 74, of Quincy, a re- 
tired teacher's aide, was 
celebrated July 2 at St. 
Boniface Church. 

Mrs. Clay worth" died 
June 29 at Beth Israel- 
Deaconess Medical Center 
after a brief illness. 

She was a teacher's aide 
at the Snug Harbor School. 

Before working for 
74 Union Park, Boston, MA Quincy schools, she worked 

as a computer operations 
supervisor at National Data 



Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to Cathedral High vSchool, 



She was a communicant 
of St. Boniface Church in 
Quincy and was involved in 
the St. Boniface Renewal 
Group. 

Wife of the late Percy 
Clayworth, she is survived 
by a brother, Robert DeGust 
of Marshfield; two sisters. 
Marguerite Mariano of 
Quincy and Irene Craig of 
Weymouth; and several 
nieces and nephews. She 
was also the mother of the 
late Linda Ann Ray. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy Center. 



A funeral Mass for Flor- She had been a registered 

ence G. (Breen) Larracey, nurse for many years at the 

83, of Waltham, formerly of Massachusetts General 

Quincy, was celebrated Fri- Hospital where she had at- 

day at Sacred Heart Church tended nursing school, 

in North Quincy. Wife of the late Bernard 

Burial was in St. Jo- Larracey, she is survived by 

seph's Cemetery, Boston. a son, Richard Larracey of 

Mrs. Larracey died June Hingham; a daughter, Claire 

30 at Marist Hill Nursing Lang of Waltham, and four 

Home in Waltham after a grandchildren. She also was 

brief illness. ihe grandmother of the late 



Corporation in Braintree. 
Previous to that, she was 
employed by the Honeywell 

Corporation in Wellesley. Donations may be made 

Mrs. Clayworth was an to the St. Boniface Parish, 

Army veteran of World War 26 Shed St., Quincy, MA 



II. 



02169. 



Gerald J. Luke, 50 

General Attorney For 
Social Security Administration 



A funeral Mass for At- 
torney Gerald J. "Jerry" 
Luke, 50, of Quincy, for- 



Michael Larracey 
Born in Hardwick, she Arrangements were com- merly of Braintree, a gen 
had lived in Quincy many pleted by the Lydon Funeral eral attorney for the Social 



tice in 1983 and was a 
member of the Massachu- 
setts Bar Association. 

He is survived by his 
parents, Marie (Buist) and 



years before 
Waltham. 



moving to 



Home, 644 
Quincy. 



Hancock St.. Security Administration, ^"y ^- L"^« °^ J??"^'"; 



John ^ Jack' Zambruno, Jr., 56 

Welfare Dept. Case Manager 

Memorial services for and the late Jack Zambruno. 

John "Jack" Zambruno Jr., He served with the U.S. 

56, of Erie, Pa., formeriy of Army and had been em- 

Quincy, were conducted at ployed as a case manager 

New Life Covenant Church for the Pennsylvania De- 



of God June 19 and at the 
Presque Isle Peninsula June 
26. 

Mr. Zambruno died June 
13 at home after a long ill- 
ness. 

Bora in Quincy Sept. 24, 
1942, he was the son of 



partment of Welfare for 
more than 13 years, retiring 
last December. 

Mr. Zambruno was ac- 
tive in the Relay for Life 
program in Erie. 

In addition to his mother, 
he is survived by his wife. 



was celebrated July 2 at St. 
Francis of Assisi Church, 
Braintree. 

Mr. Luke died June 29 at 
Hancock Rehabilitation and 
Nursing Center. 

He was formerly in pri- 
vate practice in Stoughton. 

Bom in Boston, he grew 
up in Braintree and was a 



two sisters, Mary P. Luke of 
Cambridge and Theresa H. 
Luke of Quincy; and a 
niece, Jennifer S.W. Chin of 
Singapore. 

Burial was in St. Mary 
Cemetery, Randolph. 



Funeral 
were made 



arrangements 
by the Cart- 



1969 graduate of Braintree wright-Venuti Funeral 
High School. He received a Home, South Braintree. 



degree in criminal justice 
for Northeastern University 
and a law degree from Suf- 
folk University in 1983. 
He was admitted to prac- 



Donations may be made 
to the National Kidney 
Foundation, Chatham Cen- 
ter, Suite 450, 29 Crafts St., 
Newton, MA 02160. 




Grandma loved 
classic poetry, 

traveling, 
and Grandpa. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's reading classic poetry or 

compiling a memory 
board of her favorite 
travel photos, you can 
count on us to help 
you plan a service that 
will be just as unique as the person you love. 



Angie Zambruno of Quincy Joann (Morris) Zambruno; a 

son, Shawn P. Zambruno 
and his wife, Kim, of Mount 
Pleasant, Pa.; a daughter, 
Anissa Zambruno of Con- 
nellsville. Pa.; two brothers, 
Paul Zambruno and Kevin 
Zambruno, both of Quincy, 
and a sister, Judy Palaza of 
Quincy. 

A private family memo- 
rial service will be held at a 
later date. 



Patrick G. O'Toole, 40 

Plasterer 



Give. 




American Heart 
AssociationJ 



« 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



A funeral Mass for Pat- 
rick G. O'Toole, 40, of 
Quincy, a plasterer in the 
construction business, was 
celebrated July 2 at St. 
Brendan's Church, Dor- 
chester. 

Mr. O'Toole died June 
27. 

He was formerly of 
Tiernee, County Galway, 
Ireland. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary (Joyce) County Galway. 
O'Toole; two stepsons, Pat- Funeral arrangements 
rick Joyce and Kevin Joyce, were made by Keaney Fu- 
both of Quincy; his parents, neral Home, Dorchester. 



James and Bridget O'Toole 
of Tiernee; three brothers, 
Seamus O'Toole, Colm 
O'Toole and Michael 
O'Toole, all of Tiernee; two 
sisters, Maura Lee of 
Tieraee and Peggy Malone 
of Rossaveal, Ireland; and 
many aunts, uncles, nieces 
and nephews. 

Burial was in Sean Bailie 
Cemetery, Ballinakill, 



^o^anojuneraf Service 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 

Member by Invitation Q/f^j National Selected Morticians 




I' 
V 

I 
I 

it 
(' 
I' 



Celebrating our 

50th A.nni\^ersary 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F.SWEENEY 

1 1NDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

(617) 472-6344 






Elaine A. 

Homemaker, 
NQHS FootbaU 

A funeral Mass for 
Elaine A. (Martineau) Zoia, 
79, a lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent and homemaker, will 
be celebrated Friday at 10 
a.m. at Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Zoia died July S at 
Quincy Hospital. 

Bom in Quincy, she was 
active in Sacred Heart Par- 
ish as a member of the So- 
dality. She was also a 
eucharistic minister and 
involved in the prayer 
group. 

She was an elected 
member of the North 
Quincy High School Foot- 
ball Hall of Fame. She was 
active in the Campfire or- 
ganization. 

She and her husband, 
Peter J. Zoia, recently cele- 
brated 60 years of marriage. 

Besides her husband, 
Mrs. Zoia is survived by 
three sons. Dean Zoia of 
Quincy, Gregory Zoia of 
New Hampshire and Paul 
Zoia of Florida; nine 
daughters, Janet Campbell 
of Scituate, Joanne Kelly, 
Beverly Gregory and Gayle 
Ayoub, all of Quincy; Re- 
gina Galasso of Texas, 
Carol Goward of New Ham- 
sphire, Rhonda Nickley of 
Abinxton, Cheryl Paul of 



Zoia, 79 

Member Of 
Hall Of Fame 




ELAINE ZOU 

Florida and Barbara Younie 
of Randolph; two sisters, 
Bemice Dever and Beatrice 
Garland, both of Quincy; 27 
grandchildren and 1 1 great- 
grandchildren. 

She was also the mother 
of the late Peter J. Zoia, Jr. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for Wednesday 
from 7 to 9 p.m. and today 
(Thursday) from 2 to 4 and 
7 to 9 p.m. at Keohane Fu- 
neral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Burial will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the Jimmy Fund, 1309 
Beacon St., Brookline, MA 
02446-9918. 



Alien Wahlberg, 62 

Electrician, Korean War Veteran 



A funeral Mass for 
Allen Wahlbcrg, Sr., 62, of 
Quincy, an electrician, 
was celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) at Sacred 
Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Mr. Wahlberg died July 
2 at Boston Medical 
Center. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in E)orchester before 
moving to Quincy 29 years 
ago. 

He was employed at 
Beth Steel, General 
Dynamics, the Boston 
Navy Yard and the 
railroad. 

He served in the Air 
Force for eight years 
during the Korean War. 

He was a former 
member of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers, Local 
791, and former member of 
the North Shore Art 
Association and the Milton 
Art Association. 

He is survived by his 
wife of 44 years, Catherine 
E. (Bagg) Wahlberg; five 
sons, Allen J. Wahlberg Jr. 
of Plymouth, Michael C. 
Wahlberg of Hubbardston, 
William J. Wahlberg of 
Whitman, Thomas C. 
Wahlberg of Dedham, and 
John K. Wahlberg of 
Franklin; a daughter, 
Sharon M. Broadbent of 
Quincy; four brothers, 
Robert Wahlberg of 
California, Arthur 
Wahlberg of Quincy, 
Donald Wahlberg of North 
Carolina; two sisters, 
Thelma Moser of Holbrook 
and Donna Black of 
Dorchester; and ten 
grandchildren. He was also 
the brother of the late Paul 
Wahlberg. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the 



Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart 
Association, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham, 01701. 



CX)MMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1569EP 

Estate of JAMES J. 

CARNEY 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that THOMAS 
M. BARRON of QUiNCV In 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in sakl Court at 
Dedham on or beiore ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1999. 

In addition you shoukj file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with nottee to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire. First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 6/29/1 999. 

THOMAS MTHKK HUQHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/a/99 



Arthur Salvucci, 87 

Quincy Fire Department Lieutenant 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the 
Sweeney Brothers Home 
for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 



A funeral Mass for 
Arthur J. Salvucci, 87, a 
retired Quincy fire 
lieutenant, was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
St. John's Church. 

Born and educated in 
Quincy where he lived all 
of his life, Mr. Salvucci 
was with the Quincy Fire 
Department for 27 years, 
retiring in 1967. 

When he was a young 
man, he was a semi- 
professional football player 
with the former Quincy 
Manets. He also drove a 
truck for the City of 
Quincy for many years. He 
was the owner and 
operator of the former City 
Service gas station in 
West Quincy, and of King- 
Form Construction Co.', in 
Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Ruth M. (Elliot) 
Salvucci; a brother, Joseph 
Salvucci of Brighton; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 



We need you. 



Tliunday,Jidy8,1999 Th* Qialaacy Siaaa Pace 23 

Report Street Light Outages 

24 hours, 7 days 

376-1490 



American Heaitj 
AssodatiooJ 

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR UFE 



« 



■99 




WI^^P^bWSi 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL CQURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1393G1 

NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT OF 

GUARDIAN WITH 

AUTHORITY TO TREAT 
AND/OR COMMIT 

TO: THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL 
HEALTH and to Frederick 
Allen Gleason of Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk and 
spouse or next of kin or c^her 
interested person(s). 

A petition has been 
presented to the Prot>ate & 
Family Court requesting the 
appointment of a suitable 
limited guardian of the 
person and property with 
authority to monitor the 
administration of 

antipsychotic drugs. 
Petitioner further prays that 
Cynthia Cahill of HuH, in the 
County of Plymouth, be 
appointed guardian of 
Frederick Allen Gleason, 
with authority to monitor the 
administration of 

antipsychotic medication for 
reasons more fully set out in 
said petition. 

If you desire to ot>iect to 
the allowance of said 
petition, your or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'ckx^k in 
the forenoon on the 21 st day 
of July, 1999, the return day 
of this citation. A status 
conference in tNs matter has 
been scheduled on 7/21/99 
at 9:30 AM. at Dedham to be 
attended by parties and 
counsel. No witnesses need 
attend. 

WITNESS. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justk». 

Date: June 2, 1999. 

THOMAS MTMCK HUOmS 
REGISTER OF PROaATE 

7/a/99 



UQAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-040 

ORDERED: February 16, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amerKtod as follows: 

In Title 10. Vehrcles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. Stopping, Staruling and Parking. Section 
10:20:40. Parking prohibited and restrk:ted where: A list of specific locations where parking 
is prohibited or restricted is on file in the Office of the City Clerk. 



ADDTHSFQLUQWINQ: 

siBEEi sm 

Faxon Park Rd. North 



FROM 
Alton Rd. 



IQ 



100' east 



TYPg 

RSQULAWN 
NO PARKING 



7/8/99 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 24, 1999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Halisen, Assistant City Clerk 




MQAI^NOnCE 



•»!« 



^^f!^^' 



UEQAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 98-375 

ORDERED: November 9, 1 998 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, the revised ordinances of the City 
(rf Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
10:20:40. Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific locations where parking 
is prohibited or restricted is on file iQ the Office of the City Cleri<. 



ADD n(E FOIrLOWIMG: 


FHOII 

Pope St 
Evans SL 




STREET 


OBEGWH 

East 
North 


m TYPE 

REGULATION 


Evans Street 
RuthvenSt 


Ruthven St NO PARKING 
50' north of NO PARKING 
RuthvenSt 


' 




PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1 999 

ATTEST: Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 24, 1 999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L Halisen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/8B/99 




NOTKJE 



^kfiSS 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-163 

ORDERED: June 7, 1999 

BE IT ORDAINED THAT THE CITY OF QUINCY INSTALL TWO STOP SIGNS ON 
CONNELL STREET, IN BOTH DIRECTIONS, AT KIMBALL STREET. IN THE INTEREST 
OF PUBLIC SAFETY. 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1999 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED: JUNE 24, 1999 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

A TRUE COPY 

Attest: Maureen L. Halisen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/8/99 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 99-177 

ORDERED: June 14, 1999 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, the Revised bMinemces of the City 
of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10. VEHICLES and TRAFFIC. Chapter 10.12. SIGNS, SIGNALS and MARKERS 
Section 1 0. 1 2.040. STOP SIGNS. 



SIBEEI 


mssnon 


jEmm m hek 




Northbound 


ff^GULATION 


Germain Ave. 


Marshall Conwnonwealth 1-Way 






School Avenue 7-9AM 2-4PM 






School Days 






PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1999 


, 




ATTEST: Joseph R Shea 






CLERK OF COUNCIL 






APPROVED: JUNE 24. 1999 




■ 


J«nesA Sheets, MAYOR 

ATRUECOPY 

Attest Maureen L. Halisen. Assistant City Qerk 



7/8/99 



^- 



Page 24 TTli* Quinesr Sun TtenMlay, July S, 1999 






1354 Hancock St.. Quincy Center 
770-9271 ?m770-9Z72 
Breakfast Served 6am-\\am 
Homemade doupe. 5a\ade & Deeeerte 
Gourmet Coffeee 
Delicious lc« Cream & Frozen Yogurts 
CATERING AVA]LAm£ 
HOURS: Morv%-fTkl^ 6am-4pm 





^ 



LUNCH DINNER 

Tucaday • Friday Tuciday • Sunday 

Entrcci $6.9S ■ $9.9S Early Dinner SpccUU $9.95 • 1 1 2.9S 

Sunday Bhwch !I:00- 2:00 -"^ 
Fuactioa Facilities Accommodating 20-200 ' 

Wedding • Rehearsal • Dinners • Social Gatherings 

* linfiaifemcnt Parties 



Bridal Showers 



fo 



t 


SNIRETOWN FORD 

147 SamoMt SL/RL 44 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

QuaKtxGire 

1-800-649-9246 
(508)746-3400 


VINNY SCAHNIUI 

Parts, Service, 


^^K^c5^^^ ^^^H 


Body Shop DH-ector 


-' 



KING CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 


40 Lambda 


Gl-style 


I Nothing, to 


follower 


11 Disorder 


Novotna 


41 Mountain 


16 Stick with 


5 Use cables 


air? 


akick 


9 Sandwich 


43 Ballroom 


20 Erstwhile 


mi 


favorites 


acom 


12 Copies 


47 Com- 


22 Ready to 


13 One side 


motion 


tumble 


of the 


48 Standard 


23 Sign of 


Urals 


51 "lilac time" 


healing 


14 Idolater's 


locale 


24 Future 


emotion 


S2 Hodge- 


phalarope 
25 Card 


IS Pudd'n- 


podge 


head 


53"... -saw 


game 
26 Sale price, 


Wilson's 


Elba" 


creator 


54 Japanese 


5«' 


17 Section 


honorific 


27EmaDauon 


of LA.? 


55 Droop 


29 Aye 


18 Jimmy 


56 Take a 


canceler 


Otfta's 


bteak 


30 Ram's 


hometown 


DOWN 


ma'am 


19 Rings, ' 


1 Florence 


35 Away from 


211Veasure 


Night- 


WSW 


SL 


ingale's 


37 -squash 


22 State of 


txsdemark 


39 Macaroni 


India 


20ctober 


type 


24Fieiy 
saint? 


stone 
3 "Ship of 


40 Jonsg 
leacHn 


27 Circle 


Fbob"8hip 


41 Tibetan 


section 


4Inuit 


herd 


28WeUesrole 


SAbigfish 


42 Music halls 


31>long 


story? 


43 High- 


way 


6Dos 


lander 


32 Actress 


Passos 


44 Unadorned 


Thiuman 


trilogy 
7CLXVn 


45 Belligerent 


33 Uncivilized 


deity 


34Quayle's 


sextupled 


46 Revue 


successor 


8Locale 


segment 
49YaIie 


36CSA 


for ants? 


soldier 


9 Symbol of 


50 Zilch 


37TBmertype 
38 Massage 


quality 
lOlhiant. 





TRIVIA TEXT 

by Aaron E. Tucker 



FT 


-r- 




1 


^ 






^ 


■ 




w 


!T" 


IT" 






fT" 








V 


IT" 
















W" 










pa 


^ 


» 










"Jl 




U 










B » 


" 








i 


*" 






30 


«-- 


-p 


p- 


— 













WL 




■■m 


«i jtt 










43 








«6 


w 


IT"- 


I 




« 


90 














^- 










1 


tr 










■ 










^ 









AHTwin/ TO cuorrwoRD 



nnnn nDnni nan 

nnn Tinn DOHHD 

ma HnDnn„ 

oonn nnn onran 
TOLD nrna ^a^n 
nana wna ^rrim 

[Tinnoa nm 

riBHHn nnnnnn 
n:-:u □ira:rDPnar: 
nrn nnnn nnnn 
"am n:rnu nasn 



1. What was the Dame of 
the character David Canary 
(Adam/Stnart. "All My 
auktren") portrayed oo the 
hit show. "Boouza." and 
whom WM he replaciag? 

2. Cao yov name the ador 
who pomayed the part of 
the King of Siam in The 
King and r for over 4.300 
times 00 stage? 

3. What is the state capi- 
tal of Texas? 

4. What year did leg- 
endary actress Elizabeth 
Taylor first appear oo the 
cover of TIME Magazine? 

3. Can you name the 
biggest hit single that singer 
Linda Ronstadt ever had in 
Joly of 1964? 

6. Who was the antfaor of 
the 1931 beat-seller 
XatcberlnlfaeRye"? 

7. What was the original 



name of "SeinfekT when it 
debated 00 NBC in 1989? 

8. Wheo was the last time 
Teamsters chief Jimmy 
Hoffa was eva sees? 



Man iMoiJMiiaH mH 
Of Ban"RS Ifimooki vmiQ 

Of 9002 p08 MP JSpon 

i)at|!«m tn| Xq popoq 
ttM aq jmft (aaiiaa) ponoqi 
««ami - f£6I 'DC ^W 
no IKMOQ jioD iBowmai 

t IV '8 '.opfaABD l"!FPS 
aqj- 'L 'JatoipiS fff "9 
:j)ooooNai.noA«yt9WI 
'X|nf f '.vtmy '£ UaaoXig 

I«»A l twonpoOd ««P W 
'(Djsqov ipataj) ntpy 
'ooi tsapio ogqm mo dpq oi 
poifq pnq qoou « 'Xpno 

psXuUOd PfAOQ 'I 



HOC US -locus 



■V 
MilMV aOLTINOPF 




ii<mx 



)a|ouippMia>oa-a 
-poMMu MM ojnpid z moMMP «l m*! *l 



CRITICT CORNER 



THE WINSLOW BOY: 

It doesn't get much better 
than this. We tave David 
MaoMt'i icraeapiay of 
IWmMC Ratttyw*! play. 
The ^Mulow Boy." The 
combinatioa of the two 
mcgtalcti it unbMiable! 
The slofy iiaelf ia taied 
on mMh, haviag oc cu tTed in 
Bdwardian-age EngUnd. 
Tlie Wiatlowi ve a uppei^ 
claM family of baaken. At 
dw head of die terily if 
Arthur ^^slow (ragel 
DawtharM). Hto daagtaer. 
CadMflM ( B ifce tc n 

■). b aboitt to be 
I to M ray u ll W ei . 



erfM^lyperfMdy. 
Uafoftaaatoly. 




Despite his Herciilean 
cffom. he foils. 

UirtKknowut to htm. he is 
actoaily buddag the power 
of the Eaglish Moaeithy. 
Siaoe die school it ran Iqr 
die adaiirvlly. a bnaeh of 
the Boaafcby, the adminlty 
is ooMideted iidUlibk to 

ilijMdgBBMB. 

AidMrdaddeetohimSIr 
Kobeit Morton ( J srei y 
Narthato), a well-kaowa 
ooaaervathre aitonMy. 
ralhsiian Joias in dds 
■ffm. She's a devotod Mf- 
fraglsl and is wUHag to 
halp. deepito Morton's 

the voto. The anoney 

« I _ 

tolatiw 

qaaat tolw a toB «a Ma 
&adly. 
Tha boaoto itaa to. how 

iai 




Your Horoscope 
Natasha 



ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) New avenues of 
learning have opened iq> in 
front of you, but not all of 
them are easy ot confoit- 
able. Do not drag unwilling 
participants down tliese 
paths with you. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) No matter how 
much you hate it, put in 
some serious time at the 
office, working-bench, 
CQmpater, etc. Do whatever 
is necessary in order to 
eliminate future headaches. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) A simple fbnnula 
takes the mystery out of 
several difficult equations. 
It is all right to revel m your 
newfomKl knowledge. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) Resist the tempta- 
tion to run away from a 
problem. You need to be 
there in order for things to 
get fixed, then life can 
resume its nonnal. happy 
course. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) Words and ideas have a 
powerful effect on you. 
Intellectual companions 
may appeal to you on a 
more physical level. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Strange 
sleeping-and- waling 
dreams make you wonder at 
die turmoil in your subcon- 
Kious. However, if you 
throw yourself into your 
work, you can appease your 
inner deoKms. 

LIBRA (September 23 10 
October 22) The checkbook 
balances with remarkable 
ease this week, and the 
ho«ise seems lo ctean itself. 
You are able to handle any 
task with a minimum <rf 
stress or effort 

SCORPIO (October 23 
to November 21) Your 
impetttooa spirit may feel 
somewhat weighed down 
by inexplicable forces. 
Audwrity figues are 
impressed by diia sodden 




change in your 

but of course, It wUl not 

httt 

SAGITTARIUS 
(November 22 to December 
21) Your nnique abilities 
widi friends, fronily and die 
community are much in 
demand at this time. 
Remember diat eveiy word 
and deed has the power to 
help or to huit odiers. 

CAPRICORN 
(December 22 lo January 
19) It is not enough 10 know 
the truth right now. You 
must figure out how to 
wield it before it can protect 

you. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
ID February 18) Reciprocity 
materializes in our day-to- 
day life. People are finally 
as eager to bestow gifto 
upon you as diey are to 
receive them. 

PISCES (Febmaiy 20 to 
March 20) Apply your 
attention to all the mundane 
tasks and boring details you 
would nuher ignore. 
Procrastination Kterally gets 
you nowhere 

YOU BORN THIS 
WEEK: Uncharted territo- 
ries appMl to you more dum 
the moat highly recom- 
mended hot spots. You like 
to find ycMir own way of 
dcnng things, and you don't 
feel die need for a partner or 
support group. Although 
you may tend to be distant 
or tanposooal at times, you 
really do like people. 

C 1W9 KiH n sai i ii Syil. Ine. 




For home subscription, 

please call 

(617) 471-3100 



Thundajr, jHlyS, 1999 TbwQuli&oy Sun Page 25 



John Vaka Honored As 
Sanger Center Volunteer Of Year 



Maureen McCaffrey Attends-National 
Conference On Employee Recognition 



award. 

The awards program is a 
yearly event at which the 
Ester R. Sanger Center of 
Compassion thanks its con- 
tributors and volunteers who 
support its two programs, 
the Quincy Crisis Center 
and the Mary-Martha 



John Vaka of the Quincy 
Crisis Center was recog- 
nized as volunteer of the 
year by the Esther R. Sanger 
Center for Compassi<Mi at its 
fourth annual volunteer 
awards dinner held June 7 at 
the WoUaston Nazarene 
Church. 

Several others also were 
recognized. Joyce A. Rose 
was presented the Mary- 
Martha Learning Center 
Service Award, The Rock- 
land Trust Company was 
recognized as business of 
the year and the Hingham 
Congregational Church was 
honored as church of the 
year. 

And, the organizers of 
the Friends of Mary-Martha 

— Melanie Anderson, Laura 
DeSisto, Suzanne Filbey, 
Trish Hart and Gigi Meehan food pantry on wheels. 

— received the leadership The Mary-Martha 



Learning Center in King- Maureen McCaffrey, presentation, "Blueprint to zation of 11,000 companies 

ham opened in 1986 to pro- president of corporate **« ^'8''*' Economy" ex- and individuals concerned 



vide shelter to women with 
young children. 

The center also thanked 
Roche Brothers, Stop & 
Shop, Shaw's and Star Mar- 
ket grocery stores for do- 



Lcaming Center, throughout n*!.'°8 sandwiches, salads 

^ ^ and beverages and Interstate 

Twenty years ago Esther *>"»!»<*« Corporation for pro- 

R. Sanger founded the vidmg desserts for the buffet 



scrvcices for Jack Conway P***"** •'®*' *•** Internet is with global mobility. ERC 
and Company recently re- changing companies' meth- members represent corpora- 
turned from a four-day con- «*s for providing relocation ,ions, brokers and apprais- 

services. Miller s Living ers, as well as other compa- 

and Prospering: A Humor- nies that provide services to 

ous Guide to Finding Bal- relocating families, 
ance in Modem America" Norwell-based Jack 

provided attendees with Conway and Company is 

practical tips for alleviating ,hc largest independently 



Quincy Crisis Center in re- 
sponse to seeing many who 
were in need, not only in 
Quincy but in other South 
Shore communities as well. 
The center offers a 



dinner. 

The Rev. David Wooster, 
the center's executive di- 
rector, and Heather Rideout, 
business administrator, 
summed up the year's woik. 
As it has since its earliest 



weekday feeding program at . . ^ . _ . . 

Covenant Congregational i^JJ: ^»>« ^""'^^y ^"^»^ 
Church for anyone who 



needs a meal, a 24-hour 
crisis hotline and a family 



Center relies on donations 
and volunteers. To help, call 
(617) 847-6967. 



ference sponsored by the 
Employee Relocation Coun- 
cil. 

McCaffrey, who man- 
ages Conway's Relocation 
department, said the 1999 
National Relocation Confer- 
ence provided useful infor- 
mation that will help the 
company as it serves cus- 
tomers moving into and out 
of the area. The event was 
held in Las Vegas. 

Speakers at the confer- 
ence included Don Tapscott, 
author of "Growing Up 
Digital," and humorist Dr. 
Will Miller. Tapscott's 




mVITATIONTOBID 



INVITATION IP na 



■■liuuimii 




INVITATIQN TQ BIO 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for Connection 
Roadway Construction Project - Summer 1999 until 1 0:00 



a.m. local time on Wednesday, July 21 , 1999, in the offices 

of the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy. bids will be publicly opened and read aloud 



INVITATIQN TQ BIP 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for Sewtr & Water 
Supply Systems Improvements East & West Elm Avenue 
& Sachem Street - Wollaston Beach Area 7 contract until 
10:00 a.m. local tinrte on Thursday, July 22, 1999, in the 
offices of the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169, at which time and place all 



Massachusetts 02169, at which time and place all bids will 
be publicly opened and read ak>ud. 

The work under this contract consists of selective 
excavation, including cold planing, and regrading of existing 
pavement, installation of new pavement, including full depth 
roadway construction, installation/resetting of curbs, 
wheelchair ramps, adjustment of utility appurtenances, 
loaming, seeding, storm drainage, pavement striping and 
other associated works. 

All work shall be performed in accordance with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Highway Department 
Standard Specifications for Highways and Bridges and 
Construction Standards, as last revised, unless specified 
otherwise. 

All work under this contract shall be completed within 60 
calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of i75.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract 
Documents by mail shall also include an additional UflO: 
refundable mall tee of JIS.OO in cash or check payable to 
the City of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the offices of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, Engineering Division, 55 Sea 
Street. Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 7, 1999. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security In the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
form described in the Instructions to Bidders. The Successful 
Bidder must furnish a one hundred percent (100%) 
Construction Performance Bond and a one hundred percent 
(100%) Construction Payment Bond with a surety company 



The work under this contract consists of furnishing all 
materials, labor, equipment tools apparatus and all else 
required to satisfactorily complete installation of water and 
sewer lines, including all Appurtenances, service connections, 
temporary water and sewer by-passes and service to 
residents on an as required basis, during construction, 
miscellaneous hardware and other inckJental items and/or 
work, as required or as specified. 

All work shall be performed in accordance with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Highway Department 
Standard Specifications for Highways and Bridges and 
Construction StarKlards. as last revised, unless specified 
otherwise. 

The contract time for all work under the base bid is 180 
calendar days. An additional 180 calendar days shall be 
assigned to completed all work under Alternate A. 

A non-fefundat>le deooaH of i75.Q0 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract 
Documents by mail shall also include an additional qqdz 
refundable mall fee of 115.00 in cash or check payable to 
the City of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the offices of the 
Commissioner of Publk: Works, Engiridering Division, 55 Sea 
Street, Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 7, 1999. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
form described in the Instructions to BkJders. The Successful 
Bidder must furnish a one hundred percent (100%) 
Construction Performance Bond and a one hundred percent 
(100%) Construction Payment Bond with a surety company 



acceptable to the City. The bidding and award of this contract acceptable to the City. The bklding and award of this contract 



shall be in full compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 30. Section 39M, as last revised. 

All Federal, State and City of Quincy regulations in relation 
to Minority Business Enterprise, Women's Business 
Enterprise. Minority Work Force, Equal Employment 
Opportunity. Employment of Quincy Residents and Minimum 
Wage Rates shall be complied with. 

Goals for this project are as follows: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a not less 



shall be in full ccMnpliance with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 30, Sectk>n 39M, as last revised. 

All Federal. State and City of'Quincy regulations in relation 
to Minority Business Enterprise. Women's Business 
Enterprise, Minority Work Force, Equal Employment 
Opportunity, Employment of Quincy Residents and Minimum 
Wage Rates shall be complied with. 

Goals for this project are as folk)ws: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a not less 



than ten percent (1 0%) ratio of minority employee manhours than ten percent (1 0%) ratk> of minority employee manhours 

to total manhours in each job category. to total manhours in each job category. 

2. A minimum of ten percent (10%) Minority Business 2. A minimum of ten percent (10%) Minority Business 

Enterprise (MBE) and five percent (5%) Women's Business Enterprise (MBE) and five percent (5%) Women's Business 

Enterprise participation by state-certified MBEs and WBEs Enterprise participation by state-certified MBEs and WBEs 

will be required and maintained on this project. The bidder will be required and maintained on this project. The bidder 

shall submit cnmnlate MBEA O^BE forma and SOMWBA shall submit complete UBEDNBE forms and SOMWBA 

certification letter* with the bid. certification letters with the bid. 

3 The City of Quincy's Ordinance Chapter 1 2.28, requiring 3. The City of Quincy's Ordinance Chapter 1 2.28. requiring 

Contractors working on City-supported construction projects Contractors working on City-supported construction projects 

to have a) one Quincy Resident out of every three workers to have a) one Quincy Resktont out of every three workers 

on the project and b) a bona fide apprentteeship training on the project and b) a bona fide apprenticeship training 

program must be complied with. program must be complied with. 

4. The Contractor shall pay minimum wage rates to the 4. The Contractor shall pay minimum wage rates to the 

workers, as per the latest sche^le of rates, as mandated by workers, as per the latest schedule of rates, as mandated by 

the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Departnient of Labor the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Labor 

and Induces. and Industries. 

The Cityresen/es the right to waive any Informality In or to The City reserves the right to waive any Infonnality in or to 

reject any or all BkJs when such an actkxi is deemed in the reject any or all BkJs when such an adkxi is deemed in the 



best interests of the City. Non.reaponsive and/or 

unbalanced bida mav be reiactad. 

James A. Sheets Dsnnd A. Cotton 

Mayor Commisskxier of Publk: Works 

7/8/99 



best interests of the City. Non-reaopnalva and/or 

unh«tancad bida mav be raiacted. 

James A. Sheets DavM A. Cotton 

Mayor Commisskxier of PubUc Works 

7/8/99 



stress. 
The 



Employee Reloca- 



owned real estate company 
in Massachusetts, with more 



lion Council is a profes- that 600 agents in 36 offlces 
sional membership organi- from Boston to Cape Cod. 



INVITATION TO BIO 



INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Publk: Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive seeded bids for Rivertiank Road 
Revetment Rehabilitatton Project until 1 0:00 a.m. local time 
on Tuesday, July 20, 1999, in the offices of the Commissioner 
of Public Works. 55 Sea Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
021 69, at whrch time and place all bids will be put>lidy opened 
and read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of site preparation, 
regrading of eroded areas, installation of rock materials and 
gabion mais along slopes; installation of new drainage outlet 
pipes; installation of bituminous concrete berm/curb; 
regrading, stat)ilization and construction of cement concrete 
ramp at Beet)e Road; repair existing public stairs and install 
metal hand rails; repair and pointing of joints with cement 
mortar; regrading backyards/sloped areas; repair/restore 
backyards and all public/private amenities; and all site clean 
up and related incidental works. 

All work shall be performed in accordance with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Highway Department 
Standard Specifications for Highways and Bridges and 
Construction Standards, as last revised, unless specified 
otherwise. 

All wori( under this contract shall be completed within 75 
calendar days. 

A non-rehindabie deposit of i50.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract 
Documents by mail shall also include an additional non- 
rafundabla mall fee of JIS.OO in cash or check payable to 
the City of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the offices of the 
Commisskxier of Put>lic Works, Engineering Division, 55 Sea 
Street. Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 7, 1999. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
form described in the lnstructk)ns to Bidders. The Successful 
Bidder must furnish a one hundred percent (100%) 
Constructkxi Performance Bond and a one hundred percent 
(100%) Constructkxi Payment Bond with a surety company 
acceptable to the City. The bidding and award of this contract 
shall be in full compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 30. Section 39M. as last revised. 

All Federal, State and Ctty of Quincy regulations in relation 
to Minority Business Enterprise. Women's Business 
Enterprise. Minority Work Force. Equal Employment 
Opportuntty, Employment of Quincy Residents and Minimum 
Wage Rates shall be complied with. 

Goals for this project are as follows: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a not less 
than ten percent (10%) ratio of minority employee manhours 
to total manhours in each job category. 

2. A minimum of ten percent (10%) Minority Business 
Enterprise (MBE) and five percent (5%) Women's Business 
Enterprise partrcipation by state-certified MBEs and WBEs 
will be required and maintained on this project. The bidder 
shall aubmit complete MBE/WBE forms and SOMWBA 
certification lattara with the bid. 

3. The City of Quincy's Ordinance Chapter 1 2.28, requiring 
Contractors working on City-supported construction projects 
to have a) one Quincy Resident out of every three workers 
on the project and b) a t}ona fide apprenticeship training 
program mi^ be complied with. , 

4. The Contractor shall pay minimum wage rates to the 
workers, as per the latest schedule of rates, as mandated by 
the Commonweatth of Massachusetts Department of Latxsr 
arHd Industries. 

The City reserves the right to waive any informality in or to 
reject any or all Bkls when such an actkxi is deemed in the 
best Interests of the City. Non-reaoonaiva and/or 
unbalanced bida mav be raiacted. 
James A. Sheets Davkl A. Cotton 

Mayor Commisskxier of PiMc Works 

7/8/99 



We need 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart fn 
AssodadoQ.^^ 


you. 



Page U TlM Qulaosr Bvuk Thursday, July 8, 1999 



M 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1456EP 

Estate of FRANCES A. 

MCGRATH 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that STEPHEN 
J. MCGRATH of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 28, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 6/1 8/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/8/99 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1483EP 

Estate of ARTHUR T 

CLARK 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that NANCY L. 
BEARS of WEYMOUTH In 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 28, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) In 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day. 6/1 8/1 999. 

THOMAS MTRiCK HUQI«8 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/8/99 



LEGAL NOTICES \ 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1527EP 

Estate of BARBARA M. 

ENGLISH 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that SHARON 
M. JOSEPHSON of 
IPSWICH In the County of 
ESSEX and DENISE L. 
BURR of OAKLAND PARK 
In the State of Florida be 
appointed executors, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire. First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 6/29/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/8/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1556EP 
Estate of ALICE TPROUT 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
KATHERINE M. GOOD of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix, named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 8/ 
11/1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notrce to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
RuleieA. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day. 6/29/1999. 

THOMAS MTMCK HUQHE8 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/8/99 



Cerebral Palsy Of Massachusetts 
Receives Three- Year Accreditation 



The Rehabilitation Ac- creditation Commission 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



3 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-053 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999. at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy. MA 02169. On the application of KEVIN, BRIAN, 
AND ROGER BEARDE. FIRST SOUTHEAST REALTY 
TRUST for a VARIANCE to continue parking in the front 
setback and a Use Variance to change from the present use 
of a mason contractors office and yard to utilize the property 
as a tow bt and autoAruck rental facility utilizing the existing 
building in violation of Title 1 7 as amended CHAPTER 17.16 
(USE REGULATIONS). CHAPTER 17.20 (DIMENSIONAL 
REQUIREMENTS). CHAPTER 17.24 

(NONCONFORMANCE), CHAPTER 17.28 (LOCATION AND 
LAYOUT OF PARKING FACILITIES) on the premises 
numbered 552 SOUTH STREET. QUINCY POINT. 

Edmund O'Leary. Chairman 

7/8.7/15/99 



surveyed and awarded a 
three-year accreditation un- 
der their Standard Manual 
and Interpretative Guide- 
lines for Employment and 
Community Services to the 
Children's Developmental 
Disabilities Center of Cere- 
bral Palsy of Massachusetts 
for Child and Youth Serv- 
ices, announces Executive 
Director Thomas Zukaukas. 
CP of Massachusetts is 
recognized for maintaining 
as its primary objective the 
provision of quality, out- 
come-driven rehabilitation 
services through integrated, 
coordinated, and individu- 
alized prosrams. 



The* Children's Devel- 
opmental Disabilities Center 
welcomes children from 
birth to eight years old. The 
multifaceted center based 
program includes intensive 
one-to-one and small group 
sessions. In addition to be- 
ing accredited by CARF, the 
Center is a licensed day care 
facility and approved as a 
Chapter 766 special educa- 
tion program. 

For more information on 
the Children's Develop- 
mental Disabilities Center, 
contact Jane Belcher, the 
program's social worker, at 
617-479-7980. 



Chinese Baptist Church 
Sings With Tanglewood 

Festival Chorus 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



1 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-052 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of RUSSELL & AUCE 
KNIGHT for a SPECIAL PERMIT/VARIANCE to construct 
an addition sized at approximately 12' x 20' in violation of 
Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.24 
(NONCONFORMANCE) on the premises numbered 217-221 
PARKE AVENUE & 98-102 DUNDEE ROAD, SQUANTUM. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chairman 
7/8,7/15/99 



The Chinese Baptist 
Church of Greater Boston, 
65 Washington St., Quincy, 
was invited by the Boston 
Pops Orchestra to sing with 
the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus during the recent 
holiday concerts on the Es- 
planade. 

The piece "With Voices 



UQAtl^TICS 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



>tf •„ 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-051 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy. MA 02169. On the application of CVS BY 
MANDEVILLE SIGNS for a VARIANCE for signage in excess 
of the allowable number of signs in violation of Title 17 as 
amended CHAPTER 17.32 (SIGNS), on the premises 
numbered 321 QUINCY SHORE DRIVE, NORTH QUINCY. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chairman 
7/8, 7/15/99 



INVITATION TO BID 



1 



INVITATION TO BID 

Sealed Proposals for Catch Basin Cleaning Sen/ices 1 999 
will be received at the Office of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA until 10:00 A.M. prevailing 
time on July 12, 1999 at which time they will be publicly 
opened and read. 

The Contractor to whom the Contract may be awarded 
will be required to appear at this office with the surety offered 
by him and execute the Contract within ten days from the 
date of the mailing of notice from the Commissioner to the 
bidder, according to the address given him that the Contract 
is ready for signature and in case of his failure or neglect to 
do so, the Commissioner may, at his opinion, determine that 
the bidder had abandoned the Contract and thereupon the 
certified check or bid bond shall become the property of the 
City of Quincy. 

The Contractor will be required to provide both a 
perfonnance bond and payment/latxx and materials tx}nd 
each for the full Contract price. A certified check or bid bond 
in the amount of 5% of the base bkJ shall accompany each 

bid. 
Specifications may be obtained at the Departnient of Publk: 

Wori(S upon non-refundable deposit of Ten Dollars ($10.00) 
for each set. Bidders requesting specifk^ations be sent to them 
by mail shall include a separate check in the amount of on or 
before July 6, 1999 Five doltars ($5.00) per set payable to 
the City of Quincy to cover the mailing and handling costs. 
The r^ is resen/ed to reject any or aH bids or to accept 
the bid deemed best for the City. 
JamesA. Sheets David A Cotton 

Mayor Commisskxier Of Publk: Works 

7/8/99 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Divisk)n 

Docket 96P2865E1 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of William R 
MacDonald. late of Quincy, 
in the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the 1 st and final 
account(s) of Marie Dorgan 
and Richard Villano as 
Temporary and Permanent 
Executor (the fiduciary) of 
said estate have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the fourth day of 
August, 1999, the return day 
of this citatk>n. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motton may order a written 
statement of eadh such item 
together with the grouTKJs for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Gn. p. Rule 5. 

WITNESS. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this 22nd day of 
June, 1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUQHES 
REOKTEROFPflOBATE 

7/8/99 



Raised" was commissioned 
by Director Keith Lockhart 
and the Boston Pops. 

The July 4th perform- 
ance was broadcast live on 
national television. 

Deacon Dave Yang is the 
church's music director. 
Choir directors of Lai-Meng 
Ao, Nelly Chan, and Pris- 
cilla Yeung. 

t ypi^tio:ricgy I 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
I^SSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Divisk>n 

Docket 93P2276AD 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Anne-Marie 
Notarangelo, late of Quincy, 
in the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of David E. 
Notarangelo as 

Administrator (the fiduciary) 
of said estate have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to presen/e 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the twenty-first day of 
July, 1999, the return day of 
this citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). if you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire. First 
Justice of said Court at 
De(ttuvn this eleventh day of 
June, 1999. 

THOMAS MTWCK HUQHES 
l«ai8TEfl OF PROBATE 

7/8/99 



Thuraday, July 8,1999 Tlf Quinoy Sma Page 27 




FOR RENT 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



A NEW HALL 

Elks Lan«, off 254 QiMiry SL 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCY ELXS 

847-6149 



TF 



Exmcutlva L^wn Carm 

Landscape Maintenance 

and Construction 
Spring and Fall Cleanups 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Brian (617) 268-1088 ms 



Pruning, Removals, Stump 
Grinding. Mass Certified 
AtxKist. 20 years exp. Crane 
Service. Firewood. Full ins. 
472-3596. 



W19 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 
K of C Building 

5 Hdlis Avenue 

For IntbntmUon Pha99 Catt 

767-0519 



Attics Cleaned Out 

Old Furniture & Trunks of 
Contents Etc. removed. 
Low senior citizen rates. 
Call Joe at 61 7-328-3844 



TF 



«Z3 



MS J R98ld9ntlal Servlc9$ 

Interior • Exterkx painting, car- 
pentry, gutter services, 
yardwork, cleanouts & all re' 
lated harKJyman servnes. Free 
estimates. Mike 328-8648 rm 



FLYNN 

SEALCOATING 

All Work Done 

by Brush 

No Sprays 

Quality Work 

Free Estimates 

617-471-6802 



«12 



A & T VACUUM 

> $19.95 OvtrtMulSpacial 
on any vacuum. 

• Sawing machlna rapairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 
•Sharpening 

(sdaaors, knivat, ate) 

> Crack XL Vacuums $249 

• Electroiux w/pow«r nozzle $199 

> Used vacuuma $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your South Shore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




TF 



TTie Bryan Room VFW 
24 Broad St., Quincy 

2 rooms available. 

Large room 400+ 

small room 150 guests 

1-800-474-6234 



Tf 



O'Mahony 
Cleaning Service 

Relax, let someone else do 
the work. I clean houses, 
apartnents and offices. 
CallJackie 61 7-328-4662 im 



FRED'S HANDYMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re- 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 7/. 



MASTER 
ELECTRICIAN 

Lk:#13685A 

Call Basil 
617-471-9067 /m 



Apartments Available 

2-1 BRs Weymouth $485/$525 
space mo. inci. h & hw. on Ixjs 
line, no pets, income eligitMlity 
requirements apply. Call QCAP 
at 61 7-479-81 81x1 13 



WANTED 



TM 



Think Vacation 

lu>on Mtn. Luxury Condo 

mountain and river View, 
sleeps 6. indoor & outdoor 
pools, dose to outlet shopping 
and golf course, game room, 
steam room, laundry facilities, 
weekly rentals available for 
Aug. 617-479-1603 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, damps, tool chests. okJ 
handtools, all trades (machin- 
i^, pattem maker, watchmaker, 
etc.) shop tots. Also, antk^uar- 
ian books, frames, paintings, 
crocks, lanterns. Antk^ues in 
estate tots. 1 -61 7-558-3839 tf 



SUN eiMSIFliO AOS 9ET HeSULTS! 



rns 



FOR SALE^ 



:,.\ 



Aluminum Christmas 
trees any color or size. 

Also, revolving tree 
stands and rotating color 

wheels, will pay cash. 
781-848-9623 .19 



88 Restaurant 

653 Southern Artery, 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Call Now 
(617) 786-9973 ^2 






#M^'^ 






i^4iELP WANTED 



Avon Products 

start a home-based bus! 
ness. Work flexible hours 
Enjoy unlimited earnings 
Call toll free (888) 561 
2866. 



va 



STOP EARNING MONEY 
FOR OTHER PEOPLE. 

Buito your own financial future 
through Market America's 
'Unfranchise' the most power- 
ful business opportunity of the 
90's & beyond. For more infor- 
matton call Robert & Danmara 
1-800-211-1202x02609 7« 



PERSOJ 



■» 



fȣRSONAL 



r^oris is 80 on 4th of July. 
We raised the Hag and 
ate apple pie. 

Love John Menz 
and Family 7« 



Thank You St. Jude, 

St. Anthony and 

God above for 

prayers answered. 

M.aM.7/1 



PRAYER TO THE 

BLESSED VIRGIN 

(N«v«r Known To FalQ 

"Oh, most beauliM lower of ML Caimel, 
Fruitful vine, splendor of heaven. 
Blessed Mottier of the Son of God, bn- 
nnacuiate Vvgin, assist me in my neces- 
sity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help me and 
show me, herin you are my Mother. Oh, 
Holy Mary, Mother of Qod, Queen of 
Heaven and Earth! I humbly beseech 
you from the bottom of my heart to suc- 
cor me in this necessity. (Make requesQ 
There are none that can withstand your 
power. Oh, show me herin that you are 
my Mother. Oh, Mary, conceived with- 
oU sin, pray for us who have recourse 
to thee (3X). Holy Mother, I place this 
cause in your hands (3X). Say this 
prayer 3 consecutive days. You must 
be published and itwi begrarMedto 
you. N.a 7/a 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

TheOmSU^ServiciConipam/ . 

We Sen/ice & Install 
•Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oit/Gas W&ter Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • Resklential Air Ck}nditk)ning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

Sefwce . . . /f 's Oar Only Business tf 

Annual Tune Ups $60, Includes nozzle A oil filter 
617'472-8641 24 hour Emergency Service Jerry LaFlamme 



CEDRONE TREE & LANDSCAPE 

Professional Landscape Construction & Maintenance 

• Mulch Delivery 



• Installation 

• Removal 

• Tree pruning & Removal 

• Stump Grinding 

• Lot Clearing 



• Shrub Trimming 

• Bobcat Service 

• l^wn and Property 
Clean-ups. 



^Competitive Prices - Professional Worknfianshlp* 

Fully Insured - Free Estimates! 

Call NOW 617-479-0474 



ms 



Bruce of All Trades 

Cement work (masonry). Land- 
scaping (cleanups, etc.), Paint- 
ing (int. & ext.), Capentry. Call 
for free estimates (781) 986- 
9668 or (781) 681-9983 im 



YARD WORK 

• Lawn Service • All Land- 
scaping • Free Estimates 

• 20 Years Experience 

• Senior Citizen Discount 

CallJoe 472-5469 m 



Dodd's Disposal 

Complete Cleanout Service 

Residential-Commercial 
Rubbish piles, furniture and appli- 
ance removal, cellars, attks, yards. 
Free Estimates 781-888-4141 n 



hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franklin Street 
South Quincy 472-1710 




CUDDAHY 

CUSTOM 

BUILDERS 

Residential & Commercial 

Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, 

Decks, Siding. Replacement 

Windows, Doors. 

Roofing & Painting. 

Interior/Exterior. Licensed/Insured 

781-383-6785 w. 



J.D. PETERS 
FENCE CONTRACTOR 

Wood, Chain Link 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Jim 617-773-3391 » 



Cameron Cleaning 
& Gardening 

House cleaning & garden 
work. Free job estimates. For 
servtees please call Georgia 
at (617) 471-5543 



MS 



SnopioeMtyi 



HEt>1ArAMTE& 



Freelance 
Photographer 




1372 Hancock St, Quincy, MA 02169 
Call 617-471-3100 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heait 
AssodadooJ 



« 



KEITH'S PAINTING SERVICE 

Interior & Exterior 

Ceilings & Walls Repaired 

1 Booking Available for July 

Still Booking for August 

All Calls Returned Within 24 Hours 

781-834-1229 orToll Free Pager 781-379-0528 .. 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced 

EB^ Estimate 

Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 



TF 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 

MA Rag. #116100 



TF 



Waifpaper oiJ painlUuj 
ou /n# f-^cuaeroou 

Gerard Shea 

Graduattol US School of Pro^$- 

$k)nalPaptrHanf^ Rutland, VT 

617-471-5089 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
Q Autos 
Q Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

Q Help Wanted 
Q Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

Q Lost & Found 
Q Real Estate 
Q Antiques 
Q Flea Markets 
Q Yard Sales 
Q Instruction 

□ Daycare 
Q Personal 

Q Miscellaneous 



RATES 

IWEEK Q $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

100 for each additional word. 

3.7 WEEKS Q $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 jnsertions of 

the same ad, 10<; each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS Q $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8-12 insertions 

of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 

13 WEEKS 
OR MORE C 

Q Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



NO unmo WILL m made at this coktract rate in the event of cancellation. 

DEADUNE: MONDAY, S:eM>M. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



$4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



PagclS Tl»« Quincy 0ua Tlwiriday, July >, l»f» 



2,300 Requests 
For Sidewalk Repairs 



Gorman Cites Modem 
Needs For Fire Dept. 



Public Works Commis- 
sioner David Colton has a 
50-page (and still growing) 
list of nearly 2,300 requests 
for sidewalk repairs 
throughout Quincy from 
which the ward councillors 
have been asked to list their 
top 20 priorities. 

The councillors' repair 
requests were due Friday. 

Last week the council 
approved a $500,000 appro- 
priation request specifically 
earmarked for sidewalk re- 
pairs. 

Council President Peter 
Kolson in May had pro- 
posed adding the $500,000 
appropriation request in the 
fiscal year 2000 budget. 
Subsequently, he proposed 
seeking a $1 million bond to 
address much of the backlog 
of requests, and both Mayor 
James Sheets and Auditor 
Robert Foy said it could be 
done fmancially. 

Last month Councillor- 
at-large Francis McCauIey 
suggested budgeting 



$500,000 this year and an- 
other $500,000 in fiscal year 
2001. The city would realize 
a savings of $150,000 in 
interest on the bond. 

Colton told the council- 
lors last week that he would 
need three weeks of field 
work before bids could be 
advertised during the first or 
second week of August, 
anticipating opening bids 
around Labor Day. 

Councillor-at-large 
Timothy Cahill, chairman of 
the finance committee, 
noted that the appropriation 
had only appeared on the 
agenda for the first time last 
week, but because of 
lengthy discussions earlier, 
he would support voting on 
the request that night. 

Ward 4 Councillor Mi- 
chael D'Amico said he 
wanted to be sure that the 
$500,000 was equally di- » 
vided among each ward. 

"That's only $83,000 per 
ward," said Colton, advising 
them that work where 



curbing is required will be 
more expensive. 

Ward 2 Councillor Dan- 
iel Raymondi reminded 
Colton that at one time, each 
ward had its own crew and 
there were very few defects 
that were not repaired. 

Arguing that adding an- 
other work crew should be 
considered in the future, 
Raymondi said having re- 
paired sidewalks is a matter 
of public safety. 

Councillor-at-large Paul 
Harold questioned commit- 
ting a half million dollars 
for what he considered as a 
new program. "We can't tell 
what the tax bill will be," he 
said, noting there may be 
additional costs associated 
with the hospital affiliation 
and with the newly negoti- 
ated labor contracts. 

"It is a public safety is- 
sue," McCauley concurred. 
"Some of the streets are 
bummers." However, he 
said he would support the 
appropriation. 



(Cont 'dfrom page 1) 

"The other problem is the 
value of land in Quincy," he 
said. In addition to the 
soaring costs of real estate, 
as the result of the current 
housing boom, there is not 
much vacant land available 
in Quincy, Gorman said. 

In addition, the fire de- 
partment is a labor intensive 
operation, and the city needs 
to rethink about how to de- 
liver manpower to a fire, he 
added. 

Several years ago. Mayor 
James Sheets had requested 
proposals to study the future 
fire protection needs of the 
city, but when the consult- 
ants' bids came in, their 
dizzying estimates of 
$200,000 and more were too 
high to proceed, according 
to the fire chief. 

At the same time, he 
said, there were more im- 
mediate needs to purchase 
new equipment. 

Sheets said today the fire 
department has an increas- 
ing number of calls for 



medical responses and a 
reduced number of calls to 
fight fires. 

He attributed that in part 
to better building codes and 
improved building materi- 
als, such as insulation, 
smoke detectors and sprin- 
klers. 

Gorman agreed. "Since 
we have taken over Emer- 
cency Medical Services, our 
runs have almost doubled. 

"There's good prevention 
now, plus people are not 
using space heaters. And 
fewer are smoking," Gor- 
man said. 

"For political rea- 
sons,"Sheets continued, "no 
one wants to close a fire 
station. And, geographi- 
cally, he said, Quincy needs 
stations located in its penin- 
sulas — Squantum, Ger- 
mantown and Houghs Neck. 

"If you live in Squantum 
and have a medical emer- 
gency, the firemen will be 
there before anyone else," 
he said. "1 don't see a re- 
duction in the number of 



r — — 'COUFON" — — 1 

CUSTOMER j 

APPRECIATION I 

COUPON I 

$500 OFF I 

ANY USED CAR IN STOCK I 

I 
I 
I 

You must pnsmni this toupon, I 

OfM p0r €U$lomn. . 

Cannot iw wsm/ wHh othor I 

distounts or pmmollons. I 

•• — — •COUPON- — — J 



1999 SATURN SLl 







DOWN 
LEASE 



Lease For 



$229 



Per month 






'""'leMo 



Thursday, July 8- 
Sunday, July 1 1 



39 MONTH LEASE 

INCLUDES ALL TAXES AND FEES. NO FIRST PAYMENT, 
NO PAYMENT DUE UNTIL SECOND PAYMENT 



Auto, Air CotuL 





SATIRN 

Pmts. bosad on 1 999 Solum Sll incld^. auto, i^c & tronsportotion iMth MSRP of $1 3,i80. No first payment due until second poyment. Ail tons and fees included. 20 cents pet additionol mile. Option to puiclnse ot lease end fcx $7,524. Monthly poyments 
total $8,931. Primory lender must oppiove lease. 

USED CARS/ro/n SATURN 





'95 SATURN 
SL SEDAN 

A/C, AM-FM Stereo #S0E61 

$6,895 


'M SATURN 
SLl SEDAN 

Auto, AMFM SletM ISQ476A 

$7,495 




'95 SATURN 
SLl SEDAN 

A/C, AM-FM Stereo, cass. #SQE44 

$7,995 


*94 SATURN SW2 
WAGON 

A/C, AM/FM Stereo. #S0E34 

$7,995 


'95 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

A/C. AM-FM Stereo, cassette, pw/pi, alloys. «SQESI 

$8,495 


'94 SATURN 
SLl SEDAN 

Auto, pw/pl, A/C, AM-FM Stereo, ISk. «S0E60 

$9,895 


'96 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

Auto, A/C AMFM Stereo. #S0E49 

$10,495 


'96 SATURN ST ,2 
SEDAN 

A/C, pw/pl, aulo.#SOE29 

$10,995 


'97 SATURN SCI 
COUPE 

A/C, AM-FM Stereo, cassette, r. spoiler. «SQE08 

$10,995 


'96 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

A/C, p., .AM-FM Stereo, 38k. #SQE39 

$10,995 


'96 SATURN SC2 
COUPE 

A/C, pw/pl, AM-FM Stereo cassette. «SQESO 

$10,995 


'97 SATURN SLl 

Auto, A/C, AM-FM Stereo. #SOE62 

$10,995 


'97 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

Auto, pw/pl, AM-FM Stereo cassette. «SQESS 

$11,495 


'97 SATURN SL2 
SEDAN 

Auto, A/C AM-FM Stereo. «ASQ420A 

$11,995 


'97 CHEVY 
MALIBU SEDAN 

Auto, A/Qpw/pl. AM-FM stereo ass. #S0E47 

$11,995 


'97 SATURN 
SC2 COUPE 

A/C laii-lock bnkes, % wbetis, AM-FM deieo. fS0$41 

$12,995 


'97 SATURN SCI 
COUPE 

Auto, A/C, AM-FM stereo ass. *SQS29 

$12,995 


'96 DODGE 
GR CARAVAN 

Aiilo, A/C, pw/pl, 3id seat, AM-FM Steiea CH. fSQE27 

$13,995 



Radons. 

"However, if the issue is 
delivering services, that is 
another matter," he said. 

"As we go through this 
development splurge, we 
need to re-evaluate 
[whether] we can deliver 
services to a place like 
Crown Colony. 

"We ha^sn't had that 
cverdevelopmeat elsewhere 
in the city,** he said. Roche 
Bros. And Wal-Mart are 
street-level buildings," he 
said. The other section of 
the city experiencing a 
building boom is in Squan- 
tum, at Marina Bay, he said. 

"The city is growing," 
said Ward 4 Councillor Mi- 
chael D'Amico last week. 
"We can't lose sight of the 
fact that the ofRce buildings 
at Crown Colony house 
more than 1,000 employees 
a day, and the new condos 
have added more residents" 
to the area. 

D'Amico suggested that 
the public safety committee 
look at developing an over- 
arching public safety plan, a 
five- to 10-year capital plan, 
similar to the $75 million 
plan for the schools. 

Gorman had been asked 
to attend the June 28 council 
meeting, at which the fiscal 
year 2000 budget was to be 
ratified, to explain the need 
for two new tire lieutenants. 

Earlier, D'Amico had 
proposed adding the two 
positions to oversee the E- 
911 calls. However, Coun- 
cillor-at-large Francis Mc- 
Cauley and other council- 
lors argued that other flnan- 
cial issues must be ad- 
dressed before adding new 
positions to the department. 

At last week's meeting. 
Ward 2 Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi added his voice 
to the debate. 

The two positions, he 
said, "would add manage- 
ment strength to the depart- 
ment." 

Further, Raymondi said it 
must be extremely difficult 
for career firefighters, with 
20 or 25 years' service, not 
to be able to advance be- 
cause, although qualified, 
there is no job there. 

"When the city calls for 
an exam, we do so with the 
intention of filling posi- 
tions," said Raymondi. 

The chief had called for a 
lieutenant's list last year, 
and it is due to expire July 
10. 

The department is staffed 
by 156 firefighters, 42 lieu- 
tenants, 14 captains and five 
deputy chiefs, said Gorman. 







A DIFFERENT KIND o/COMPANY. A DIFFERENT KIND o/CAR. 

Saturn of Quincy 

Furnace Brook Pkwy., Quincy, MA Exit 8, Southeast Expressway 

Please visit our web site: www.saturnofquincy.com 

617-328-1000 sMuwi. 

SALEHOVtlS:IK>-W9-9,n9^SAM,Smn-5 .SEIIVKEHOUIIS:7:30-5:30,MOII-ni:OnH\nD.HKair71LSni 




SnOOi/rx 



t» 



695 ADAMS ST. 
QUINCY 

(617) 773-2929 



Vtoft Of vov m» iatfOi¥ 

vs. Kfffm m» t/2 0¥n 

MTom It M m mwcm» 

wmtiMMmma 

frm onm f/i /m mxtH 

(km iooti smi M mw m 
Buy fmm *fS 

3mif *S0 



^^^M^ 



^1 





«*«««««««Mu|i««««»5-0IGn 02269 
THOMAS aim PUBLIC LIBRARY 
PO BOX 379 
QUINCY MA 02269 




Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL. 31 No. 42 



Thursday. July 15, 1999 



35C 



NEWS 

INSIDE 



Bellotti Creates 

First Victims 

Service Unit 

— Page 2 

▼ 

New Higlipoint 

Plan Pubiic 
Hearing Aug. 24 
~ Page 3 
▼ 

Scout Honors For 
Gilis, Agnitti 

— Page 10 

▼ 

It's Sidewalk 

Festival Fun Time 

— Pages 15-1 8 

▼ 

Fitness For 

The Frazzled 

— Page 20 

T 
Local Skippers 
Shine In 
Lipton Cup 

— Page 21 

▼ 
^orrisette On Rec 
Hot Win Streak 

— Page 23 

▼ 

Sheets To Host 

Mayors, Business 

Conference 

~ Page 29 



Weather 
Forecast 



t-< 




PtmySMm Hnirs 



INHUMANITY TOMAN 




DAVID EZICKSON, retired Quincy school teacher and founder of the Quincy Jewish 
Committee, prepares the site for his planned Holocaust Memorial and "Man's Inhumanity 
to Man exhibit'' at the edge of the Hancock Parking h>t across from Quincy District Court. 

(Quincy Sun PhotolRohert Noble) 

So That We Won 't Forget 

He's Creating A 
Holocaust Memorial 



After Draining 150 
Million Gallons Of Water 

No Sign 

Of Body 

In Quarry 

By MARILYN JACKSON 

District Attorney WiHiam Keating says there is 
no indication of a body in the Granite Rail 
Quarry, but he won't give up the investigation for 
at least another few days. 



By ELAINE NORTON 

NEVER AGAIN. 

That's what the sign says 
on the strip of land across 
from the courthouse on 
Dennis Ryan Parkway. 
Many have seen it, but what 
does it mean? 

To David Ezickson, 
founder of the Quincy Jew- 
ish Committee, and the per- 
son who erected the sign, it 
means that never again 
should the atrocities of the 
Holocaust be repeated. And 
to remind us of this, he is 
constructing a Holocaust 
memorial across from the 
courthouse. 

But it will take' a lot of 
work, and Ezickson, 64, can 
not do it alone. 

A former Quincy Public 
School teacher, Ezickson 
has made it his passion to be 



caretaker, for the last ten 
years, of the strip or island 
of land on which the memo- 
rial will stand. Once re- 
ferred to as "garbage lane," 
the parcel of land is now 
attributed to learning, the 
beauty of nature, and hon- 
oring people. 

"I really felt that there 
was nothing that ever enun- 
ciates the Holocaust," ex- 
plains Ezickson. "We have 
very short memories. We 
haven't learned." 

"The schools are now 
looking at similarities and 
differences between now 
and the 1940's. Look at 
what's going on in Kosova 
and the Serbs, and at Col- 
umbine (High School, Colo- 
rado)." 

Regarding the memorial, 
he feels it's only appropriate 
to remember those who 



lived through the Holocaust, 
and to honor the few re- 
maining Holocaust survi- 
vors, especially those living 
in Quincy. Ezickson, whose 
own wife lost half her fam- 
ily during the Holocaust, 
estimates this number to be 
fouf or five. But there may 
be taore. 

Already established on 
the land is a memorial to 
John Quincy Adams, our 
sixth president, which reads 
MAN'S HUMANITY, re- 
ferring to man's humanity to 
man. The new memorial 
will read MAN'S 
INHUMANITY TO MAN, 
referring to man's inhu- 
manity to man. 

According to Ezickson, 
the memorial is not some- 
thing he can physically 
complete by himself. He is 
(Cont'd on page 11) 



"Granite Rail Quarry is 
virtually drained, as we 
speak," said Keating Tues- 
day afternoon. "In the last 
several days, because we are 
near the bottom, the drain- 
ing went quite rapidly. 

"Maybe there is a foot of 
water remaining." 

In fact, there was so little 
water remaining, the pumps 
were pulled out late Tues- 
day a^emoon. 

Altogether, about 150 
million gallons of water 
have been drained from the 
quarry since last August. 

On Tuesday, two state 
troopers, including one with 
a German shepherd, trained 
to fmd human remains, went 
down to the area where 
there had been reports that a 
body had been sighted, said 
Keating. 

"There's no indication, 
either through the use of the 
dog or through visual ex- 
amination of any remains," 
he said after speaking with 



Det. Lt. Robert Friend who 
had explored the site. 

"What's at the bottom, 
amazingly, is the 20-foot to 
30-foot-high mountains, 
maybe higher, of decades of 
debris and waste." 

"Unlike Swingle's 
Quarry, when it was 
drained, [the Granite Rail 
Quarry] is just a repository 
of tons and tons of debris. 
Much of it is almost pow- 
dery in composition because 
of decades of being in the 
water. 

"The little that's re- 
maining — the kerosene, oil 
and who knows what kinds 
of solvents and wood — has 
disintegrated into powder." 

However, Keating was 
not prepared to say that the ^ 
investigation has ended. 

"We were given infor- 
mation [from an informant] 
as to where the body alleg- 
edly was thrown. ..and we 
will make an initial deter- ' 






rowo » ova vns 



At St. A nn 's School 

Swimming Pool Could Be 
Converted Into Youth Center 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

An unused swimming 
pool at St. Ann's School 
could be filled with earth 
and capped with concrete to 
provide a drop-in center for 
Quincy 's youth. 

However, added the Rev. 
Thomas Keane, pastor of St. 
Ann's, it would cost about 
$215,000 to do the work. 

Keane said he envisioned 
young people playing bas- 
ketball or bowling. 

"I see a great opportunity 
to have a real drop-in center 



for our youth," Keane told 
some 600 residents of Bos- 
ton and Quincy at a meeting 
of the Greater Boston Inter- 
faith Organization, held at 
Boston College High School 
last month. 

About two dozen com- 
munity organizations and 
churches in Boston and 
Quincy comprise GBIO, 
including members of St. 
Ann's Church, St. Chrysos- 
tom's Church and the 
United First Parish Church 
in Quincy. 



"I have lived in Quincy 
15 years, and 1 have a 14- 
year-old daughter attending 
Quincy public schools," 
added John Hunt, a member 
of the United First Parish 
Church. He said he would 
welcome public support. 

Claire Fitzmaurice, an- 
other member of United 
First Parish Church, pointed 
out that many teens in 
Quincy have nothing to do. 

"Other than sports 
leagues and after-school 
clubs — although many 



work at part-time jobs — 
too many just hang out and 
drink," she said. 

In a city of 87,000, she 
said, police cruisers re- 
sponded to 6,000 calls in 
1996, of which 3,000 were 
related to youths, she said. 

She proposed looking 
into how Weymouth went 
about creating a teen center 
at the former police station 
on Pleasant Street, which is 
in its first year of op- 














••74 »»«» * .4««Tf>mA« 

t 



4. 






.- ■ f \ 



MAFERA FAMlUr 
BOa k BfTTY 



BOB. iK^m-UEE 
i BENJIArERA 



MMOf MCilML 
JMIES SARAN 



EUZAtEIHeta 
SȣM CtMflLES 

Vim 



1 t>l «> 



MHt£.-MnEN 
A OICLVN KAFCtU 



JOHM A RfTA 

;MA>mM 



i« (riH - i ll I m> 



I THEUcwrms 

Jli im SHEiU 









f A GREAT DOCTOR 
" CHARtESWEftF 




MOPtACC 

UKE^KME 



CURTIS CHIiDRCH 
m BARB MIDO^ 



THE 'WALK OF NAMES' on Constitution Common In 
fhmt of new City Hail. There is room for more names. 

(Harry Brett/Image Photo) 



AflMM 



itamm 



Page 2 Tli* Quinojr Sua 



'niur«dfy,July ISyiW9 ^^., 



PaineWebber 

Charles C. Gilbert - Financial Advisor along with 



MUNDER 

CAPITAL 
MANAGEMENT 



Cordially invite you to attend a special presentation regarding 

THE FAST-GROWING INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 
OF THE INTERNET AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY 

FEATURING 

CHIP MECHLER, Regional Marketing Director 
Munder Capital Management 

Learn about the explosive growth of the Internet, the companies and industry sectors currently well-posi- 
tioned to profit and benefit from this growth and The Munder, NetNet Fund's portfolio selection process. 

T\iesday, July 13, 1999 - 7:00pin 

and 

Wednesday, July 28, 1999 - 7:00pin 

Braintree Sheraton Hotel 
37 Forbes Road, Braintree, MA 02184 

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED SEATING IS LIMITED! 

Please RSVP as soon as possible at (617) 261-2506 (24 hours) 

This Fund carries addilional risk resulting from lack of industry diversification and may not he suitable for all investors. Technology securities tend to he 
relatively volatile as compart d to other types of investments. For more complete information about The Munder NetNet Fund, including charges and ex- 
penses, please call your financial consultant. Please read the prospectus carefully before investing. Distributor Funds Dislributors, Inc. 



•^ 

* 



The Samoset Pharmacy Tradition 
is not dead, it is alive and well at... 




in North Quincyl 
475 Hancock Street! 



SUNDAY BOSTON 
GLOBES & HERALDS 

$1.50 

Price Valid at this Osco Drug location only, until at least 8/1/99! 




SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIALl 

5 for $6 

• 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 
• 1 gallon of West Lynn Milk (1%, 2% or fat free) • Best Buy 
English Muffins • Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid while supplies last, me special per coupon. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Price increase due to our increased milk cost. 
\ Vali d Sunday 7/18/9 9only. Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. j 

Your Osco in North Quincy, 

A Big Store Carrying 
On a "Nahorhood" Tradition. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted 

(Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-noon) 



Bellotti Creates 

First Victim 

Services Unit 



Norfolk County Sheriff 
Michael Bellotti has created 
the first-ever victim services 
unit to help all victims of 
crime with concerns about 
jail sentences and other re- 
lated matters. 

"At the sheriffs office, 
our primary responsibility is 
the custody of inmates, but 
we should also have a re- 
sponsibility to the victims of 
the crimes committed by 
these same inmates," said 
Bellotti. "The creation of 
this unit is a step in that di- 
rection." 

Jeannine Kremer will 
serve as director of the vic- 
tim iservices unit. A gradu- 
ate of Rutgers University, 
she holds a master's degree 
in social work from Boston 
College and is a licensed 
social worker. 

Special Sheriff Courtney 
Cahill, who spent five years 
prosecuting domestic vio- 
lence cases at Quincy Dis- 
trict Court before joining 
Bellotti 's staff, will work 
closely with Kremer in 
strengthening and creating 
programs for victims and 
their families. 

Kremer will help victims 
with safety planning, assist 
in the CORI (Criminal Of- 
fender Records Index) certi- 
fication process and aid in 
crisis intervention by pro- 
viding referrals to shelters 
and other agency resources. 
She will work with vic- 
tims of domestic violence 
and sexual assault as well as 
victims of assault and bat- 
tery and families of victims 
of motor vehicle homicide. 

"In the past, the sheriff's 
office has only notified a 
victim that an inmate will be 
released," said Kremer. 
"We're going to raise that 
service level and actively 
work with the victim on the 
issues that concern them." 
She also will be respon- 




MICHAEL BELLOTTI 

sible for community out- 
reach and will train police 
officers and other law en- 
forcement officials and 
community agencies on 
domestic violence and re- 
lated issues. And, she will 
teach seminars for staff at 
local schools about teen 
dating violence and sexual 
harassment. 

For the past four years 
she has been a domestic 
violence advocate and 
community educator for the 
district attorney's office and 
coordinated the monthly 
domestic violence round- 
tables held monthly in Nor- 
folk County. 

Bellotti said Tuesday that 
the newly created victim 
services unit dovetails with 
Vice President Al Gore's 
anti-crime agenda outlined 
at Boston Police headquar- 
ters. 

Gore called for an over- 
haul of the criminal justice 
system that would make it 
tougher on criminals and 
also recognize the rights of 
victims, suggesting a con- 
stitutional amendment for 
victims' rights. 

Bellotti, who attended 
Gore's visit, said he sup- 
ported Gore's goals. 

"I support the Vice 
President's call to protect 
the victims of crimes by 
fully recognizing their 
rights," said Bellotti. 



Patricia Vacca Receives 
Suffolk Law Degree 



Patricia R. Vacca of 
Quincy was awarded the 
degree of Juris Doctor at the 
recent commencement exer- 
cises of Suffolk University 
held at The FleetCenter in 



Boston. 

A 1996 graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts 
at Dartmouth, whe is the 
daughter of John and Joanne 
Vacca of Quincy. 



H\Hl! 



UvXKK 



ei7-472-a250 

^^Copeland Strf> 



Thursday, July 15, 1999 Tlif Quiiney Sun Page 3 



Public Hearing Aug. 24 
On New Highpoint Plan 

The public hearing on thle In March, the council cilities, with a swimming 
new Highpoint apartment turned down the proposal, pool, tennis courts, exercise 
proposal will be held at 7 This time, Stratouly is ap- rooms and a meeting space, 
p.m. Aug. 24 at the Quincy plying for a comprehensive would be provided as well. 
High School auditorium. permit for the development The earlier proposal. 
On May 25, Highpoint from the zoning board of called for half of the apart- 
developer Dean Stratouly, appeals. ^^^^^ ^^ ^ two-bedroom 

president of Congress The new design calls for ^^^ ^^ ^^,j one-bedroom 

constructing IS eight-story 
buildings which would 
contain the mixed-income 
apartments — 328 three- 
bedroom units, 657 two- 
bedroom units and 656 one- 
bedroom units. 

In addition, the plan calls 
for preserving more than 50 
apartments, essentially the acres of open space which 

same number originally will be developed as walk- . ^ . r wi- u 
submitted to the planning ing trails with a buffer zone deP^f^ment of public works 
board and City Council, of woodlands to separate k*?Tk"?^ f h"1 
acting as the special permit Highpoint from the neigh- ^^ ^""f^. d«P^^™7» f ^^J* 
granting authority for a borinihomes. '''"^"''^ previously to the 



Group Ventures, filed a new 
housing plan for his 75-acre 
Quarry Street site which 
would dedicate up to 410 
apartments for affordable 
housing. 

The proposal, as pre- 
sented, calls for 1,641 



units, plus an assisted living 
complex. 

In preparation of the 
hearing, the zoning board 
has asked all city depart- 
ment heads to submit com- 
ments on the new Highpoint 
apartment complex proposal 
by Aug. 1. Much of the 
material requested of the 
department of public works, 
the planning department and 




A PRESIDENTIAL CEREMONY — City Coundl Presideiit Peter KoIsod, who was serving 
as acting mayor, Coundllor-at-large Paul Harold, aadministrator of the Adams Temple and 
School Fund, Adams National Historical Park Ranger John Staawich and Cdr. Charles 
WiscmaB, commanding ofHcer of the Naval Reserve Center, laid a wreath on the tomb of 
John Quincy Adams, the sixth President,, on the occasion of his 232 birthday anniversary. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 



planned unit devel(^ment. 



Common recreation fa- 



presented previously 
city council. 



Pre-TVial Conference 

19 On Cahill 
Conflict Complaint 



Ayers To Host Squaw 
Rock Cleanup Saturday 



Aug. 



Councillor-at-large 



Timothy Cahill will return property near the proposed 

to Quincy District Court site off Quarry Street, he 

Aug. 19 for a pre-trial con- should have absented him- 

ference on a criminal charge self from the discussions, 
of violating the state's con- Plymouth County assis- 

flict-of-interest law. tant district attorney Patrick 

At his arraignment July Bomberg is prosecuting the 

8, Cahill pleaded not guilty case. Norfolk County Dis- 

to the charge, brought by the '"«» Attorney William 

Building and Construction Keating had requested a 

Trades Council of Quincy special prosecutor be as- 

and the South Shore. signed to the case as Cahill 

The council claimed Ca- a^so is an elected Norfolk 



law and his parents own Group Ventures, headquar- 



(Cont'd on page 14) 



Ward 6 Councillor/State at 9 a.m. at the Nickerson 
Rep. Bruce Ayers will host Post and plan to work for 
a neighborhood Squaw two hours, at which time the 
Rock cleanup day Saturday cookout will begin, 
in conjunction with the Po- The event always prom- 
lice Athletic League and the Jses to be a great way for 
Squantum Community As- neighbors to meet and for 
sociation. the community to work to- 
gether. All are invited to 
Participants should meet participate. 



If you have any ques- 
tions, call Sandra Buckley at 
the Squantum Community 
Center at 376-1361 or Bruce 
Ayers at 472-9877. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



hill should not have partici- 
pated in the discussions of 
nor should have voted in the 
matter of the proposed $200 
million Highpoint apartment 
complex. 

The council claimed that 
because Cahill 's sister-in- 



County official. Cahill 
serves as county treasurer. 

Cahill 's attorney is Tho- 
mas Kiley, who also is de- 
fending the city in a lawsuit 
brought by Highpoint de- 
veloper Dean Stratouly, 
president of Congress 



9ann?> Clean^et^. int. 

CLEANING fiffiHr TAILORING 




TRY US AND SEE 
THE DIFFERENCE! 

• Shirt Service 

• Wedding Gowns 

• Full Tailoring Service 

• Superior Dry Cleaning • Free Storage 

Same Day Service 

Large Accessible Parking Lot 

Free 24 Hour VIP Express Service 

Newest Loarthnl 

642 Adams St., Quincy 

(n«xt to Montillo's BakMy) 

617-472-6262 

Elm St., Braintree (781) 843-1678 

Adonis St., Eost Mlltoii (61 7) 696-7047 



'3,00 Off 

I Any 4 OR Afom frem i 

I bMtt ikkh. bflm 7/JI/W I 

I I 



Do you dread dealing with 

another bank merger? 

You're wanted & welcome 
at Colonial Federal ! 



affiTiir 








FIDIR A K , 


■^.M 


1 J 


m 


■l.=« - .^=^-1 


r^Bi- , 


! « i'^Pf 







We are Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank - chartered in 1889 and 
still a 100% local neighborhood 
bank. Our South Shore roots are 
deep and we have everything you 
need and want from a bank today. 
Like what? Personal & commercial 
checking accounts with 24 -hour 
ATM/debit card access, 'round-the- 
clock telephone banking, higher 
rates on Certificates, competitive 
rates on loans, convenient ATMs & 
drive-up tellers, lots office parking. 



Colonial Federal 
Savings Bank-^ 
100% local. 
100% friendly. 



local decision-makers who know the 

market and happy employees who wUl 

go out of their way to make sure you 

are a satisfied customer. Best of all, 

we are an 

independent 

mutual bank, ^^ ^ )^^ /\ / 

70 

APY 



2i MONTH CERTIFICATE 




which means 

we cannot 

be taken over 

or forced into 

a hostile merger. Sound good? 

Come see us. Or call 617-471-0750. 




COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY: 15 Beach St., next to Wolbston Post Office 617-471-()7?»0 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle & Wa5hington Sts., next to Stop& Shop 781-331-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin St., next to Stop& Shop 781-767-1776 

APY as of mn*). Rate lubject co" change Miiumum deposit u IIWK). IRA and 4l»l K rollover* are we^konie 
A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. Other rates H terms are av-ailaMe. Please ask for more intorination! 



Imurcit H>H 



S 



i^ 



Page 4 Til* Qulncy Sua Thursday, July 15, 1999 



Cl^lNICN 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35« per copy. $15.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$1 7.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $20.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

The Oulncy Sun asaurriM no financial rasponsiblrty for typographical errors In 
advertisamants but will reprint that pan of an advertisement in wfuch tfie typographical 
error occur*. 



How To Prepare 
For A Hurricane 



The Massachusetts 
Emergency Management 
Agency (MEMA) is offer- 
ing tips to Massachusetts 
residents to help prepare for 
the Atlantic hurricane sea- 
son. 

Weather experts are pre- 
dicting another active year 
for hurricanes and tropical 
storms in the Atlantic 
Ocean. 

"Every family should 
have a basic supply kit that 
could be used for any emer- 
gency," said Acting MEMA 
Director Bud lannazzo. 
"Everyone should keep 
certain items around the 

hoil'*'* in 'hp avant of a hur- 
ricane or other severe 
weather. A portable radio, 
flashlight, extra batteries, 
and extra food and water are 



all essential to help your 
family weather the storm." 

Every household should 
have a supply of canned 
goods and other non- 
perishable foods that do not 
need cooking, along with 
enough water for each fam- 
ily member (2 qts. per per- 
son/per day), extra prescrip- 
tion medication, and extra 
food and supplies for infants 
and pets. A manual can 
opener and a basic first aid 
kit are also essential. 

"You should also call 
your local authorities to fmd 
out where emergency shel- 
ters are located in your 
mmmiinitv," said Ianna770. 
"It's important to know 
where your local shelter is 
before an emergency situa- 
tion occurs." 




THE HISTORY CHANNEL. 

On July 13, 1787, the Continental Congress adopted the 
Northwest Ordinance making rules for statehood of the 
Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio River and west of 
New York, guaranteeing freedom of religion, support for 
schools, and no slavery ... July 12, 1804, Alexander 
Hamilton died from a gunshot wound received the day 
before in a duel with Vice President Aaron Burr . . . July 14, 

1853, Commodore Matthew C. Perry, U.S.N., was received 
by Japan ... July 13-16, 1863, during draft riots in New 
York City, about 1,000 people were killed or wounded, and 
some blacks were hanged by mobs ... July 18, 1918, an 
allied counter-offensive was launched at Chateau-Thierry 
... July 16, 1945. the first atomic bomb, produced at Los 
Alamos. N.M., was exploded at Alamogordo, N.M. . . . July 
18, 1955. the leaders of the U.S.. Britain, France and the 
U.S.S.R. began a summit meeting in Geneva. Switzerland 

... July 12-17, 1967. race riots inNewark, N.J., resulted in 
the deaths of 26 people, the injuries of 1.500. and more 
than 1,000 arrests ... July 12, 1974. John D. Ehrlichman 
and three White House "plumbers" were found guilty of 
conspiring to violate the civil rights of Pentagon Papers 
leaker Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist by breaking into his 
office ... July 17, 1996. TWA Flight 800. bound from New 
York to Paris, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean shortly after 
takeoff, killing all 230 aboard ... July 15, 1997. fashion 
designer Gianni Versace was shot to death in Miami Beach 
by serial murderer Andrew Cunanan. who later committed 
suicide ... July 16, 1997, the Dow Jones passed 8,000 for 
the first time ... July 14, 1998, Independent Counsel 
Kenneth Starr subpoenaed a number of Secret Service 
agents to testify on the Monica Lewinsky matter . . . July 

14, 1998, Attorney General Janet Reno sought a hearing on 
this issue before the full Court of appeals ... July 16, 1998, 
Attorney General Reno's request was rejected, after which 
the Justice Department filed two motions with the Supreme 
Court ... July 16, 1998, Kenneth Stair stated in a filing to 
the Supreme Court that he had "information that Secret 
Service personnel may have observed... crimes... in and 
around the White House complex" ... July 17, 1998. the 
Secret Service agents testified before Starrs grand jury. 

O l99SrKing Features Synd . Inc. 




Snnlieanis 



By Henry Bosworth 



Choral Society Tours France 



Don't know if anyone said "Lafayette we are here," 
when they landed. 

But some 45 or so members of the Quincy Choral 
Society, one of our cultural assets, are in France on 
tour. 

Not just sight-seeing. But giving concerts, Quincy 
style. 

The group, headed by Conductor John Nichols and 
including family members, left Boston last Thursday 
night and will return Saturday. 

They were scheduled to present three or four con- 
certs in the Tours and Paris areas. 

Among their offerings: "I Love Paris In The Spring- 
time," "Marseillaise," the French national anthem, and 
Hoagy Carmichael and Leonard Bernstein numbers. 

And when they are not singing, they are seeing. And 
in France there's a lot to see. Stops on their itinerary 
include: 

The Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame Cathedral, a driving 
tour of the "City of Lights," the reconstructed home of 
Joan of Arc, the country home of famed artist Claude 
Monet, the Musee du Louvre with its collection of art 
from ancient times to the 19th century. And, of course, 
a few wine cellars. 

And, there was a bonus: the celebration of Bastille 
Day (Wednesday) which to France is what the Fourth 
of July is to us. 

For Don Hunter and his wife, Florence of Adams 
Shore both of whom are active in the Quincy Commu- 
nity United Methodist Church, it was their fifth visit 
-to Paris. 

And Don had one before that-back in 1944. 

He was an Army Air Force medic and technical ser- 
geant back then. And he still vividly remembers his B- 
26 bomber outfit blasting an airfield to help liberate 
Paris from the Germans. 

He prefers seeing Paris as it is today. 

And, incidentally, if someone did say "Lafayette, 
we are here," it would have been quite fitting. 

Lafayette visited Quincy twice in 1824 and 1825 
and was a guest of the Adamses at the Adams Man- 
sion. 

Q 
ONE OF THE reasons Peter Kolson is running for 
an at-large seat up against three incumbents is that he 
got tired of waiting for an open seat 
to come his way. 

A seat opened in 1995 after 
the late Patricia Toland was named 
assistant city clerk. But Paul Harold, 
after losing his bid for Congress, 
KOLSON decided to run for that one and won 
it while topping the field. 




Two years ago, another at-large seat opened when 
Michael Cheney decided not to seek re-election. 
Former Mayor Frank McCauley ran for that one and 
won it. 

This year, Koison thought there was going to be an 
open seat with his name on it. That was when Harold 
was seriously thinking of challenging Mayor James 
Sheets. But Harold decided to seek re-election instead. 

Kolson feels he had waited long enough and that if 
ever he was going to run at-large, this year was as good 
a time as any. 

It is his last year to take advantage of the extra ex- 
posure he has been getting for four years as council 
president. 

Plus, serving as acting mayor when Sheets is out of 
town as he is this week, vacationing in Pennsylvania. 

Q 

THE WARD 1 city council seat field is getting more 
crowded. 

Latest to take out nomination papers is Stephen 
Hennessy of Bicknell St., Germantown. If he files 
them, he will be the sixth candidate for the seat Peter 
Kolson is vacating to run at-large. 

Q 
IN CASE YOU'VE been wonder- 
ing, Pat McDermott is running for 
re-election to his Ward 3 city coun- 
cil seat. McDermott took out nomi- 
nation papers last week~the last in- 
cumbent to do so. 

Q McDERMOTT 

DON'T WANTTO jinx her, but Tracy Wilson has a 
win streak going as an assistant dis- 
trict attorney to Bill Keating. 

She's been prosecuting crimi- 
nal cases in Dedham. And, as of this 
writing, they tell me she has won 
them all. 
WILSON □ 

JIM STAMOS, candidate for the Ward 6 city coun- 
cil seat, says while campaigning door-to-door, one 
thing stands out. 

"In talking with residents I find 
that each neighborhood in Ward 6 is 
unique and, therefore, each has dif- 
ferent needs and concerns," he says. 
He says he hopes to hear more on 
residents concerns and views at a 
"Cookout on the River" fundraiser STAMOS 

coming up Tuesday, July 27, 6 to 9 p.m., at the Best 
Western Adams Inn, 29 Hancock St., North Quincy. 
(Donation $20. Call 472-4350 for more information.) 






Ri:ai)i:ks Forum 



A Solution To Those Abandoned Shopping Carts 



1 cannot understand why taking shopping carts out 

our City Councilors moves of a retailer's parking lot. 

so cautiously when it Be it a minority, 

comes to the issue of handicapped, elderly 




Theodora RoosMwtt wu ttw first PresidMit to rfdt In an 
automobUo. He toured Hwtford. CL in a Columbia Etoctra 
Victoria on August 22, 1902. 



person or whoever, the 

carts are not ours to claim. 

When we visit Finland 

we do not see one 

abandoned cart. There, you 
deposit 1 mark (25 cents) 
for use of a cart and the 
deposit is returned. The 
owners of our super 
markets should sit down at 
the drawing board and see 
if the installation of this 
system would be cost 



effective. Soda cans at 5 
cents each are being 
picked up each day, 
perhaps carts at 25 cents 
each may find their way 
back. Secured carts would 
surely prevent dented 
fenders and the reduced 
overhead may be reflected 
on our grocery bill. 

Martha Robinson 
Garfield St 



TbMTsday, July IS, 1999 Tl|p Quincy Siin P»gt5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS AN EARLY 1930's postcard view ofHancock ater, later named the ART. There appears to be ample 

Street in Quincy Square. The store on the left was parking spaces available in this picture, the problem 

Heffeman's Shoe store; they were in business for al- today is we have too many cars, 
most fifty years. Just beyond was the Alhambra The- From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Ri :\i)i Rs FoRiM 



Teachers' Support Appreciated 



Editor, The Quincy Sim: 

I finally caught up with 
reading some newspapers 
which had accumulated. It 
was with great pleasure that 
I read the recent letter from 
Sal Gianatani ~ "Teachers 
Get Too Little Respect." 
What he had to say was 
right on the mark and was 
especially significant com- 



ing fi-om a member of an- 
other branch of public 
workers who know what 
respect means. From a re- 
tired teacher, many thanks 
for speaking up. 

It would be helpful, it 
seems to me, if some of the 
public education reformers 
and some bashers spent 
some time in public school 



classrooms just to find out 
how much teachers accom- 
plish despite the constant 
bashing. 

The support of Quincy 
parents during the recent 
contract negotiations was 
very helpful and welcomed. 
It was fortunate that the 
School Committee and 
Mayor finally saw the light 



and made a more decent 
offer showing some respect ' 
and appreciation for the 
work that Quincy teachers 
do. Not that there isn't still 
room for improvement if we 
wish to help our teachers in 
this competitive world of 
today. 

Margaret King 
49 Avalon Av«. 



'Hats Off To The Police Department 



(The writer submitted 
the following letter for 
publication) 
Dear Chief Frane: 

The management and 
residents of Town Brook 
House would like to 
sincerely thank you, Sgt. 
Danny Minton and all 



others who participated in 
the Senior Police 
Academy four week pro- 
gram conducted at our 
housing. 

Every presentation was 
most informative and 
educational. We cannot 



thank the presenters 
enough for the excellent 
job they did. "Hats OfT to' 
the Quincy Police Depart- 
ment from the Town Brook 
House Seniors for being 
such caring individuals 
and always there to assist 



the seniors in Quincy. 

We hope this wonderful 
program will continue and 
be enjoyed by many for 
years to come. 

Jan Kelly 

Town Brook House 

Administrative Assistant 



JFK Health Center Should Be Kept For Fire Station Site 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

On June 28, Fire Chief 
Thomas Gorman spoke at 
the City Council meeting of 
the need of a new fire sta- 
tion in the very near future 
and the needs of our Fire 
Department as we approach 
the year 2000. 

I am recommending the 
city owned property at 1120 
Hancock St. which is the 
J.F.K. Health Center and 
was declared as "available 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

On Tuesday, June 8, it 
was a sweltering 90 degree 
day, but the men and 
women from the South 
Shore Blind Center in 
Squantum Gardens were 
having a most enjoyable 
program. 

Ms. Ellis Deaner, 
representative of Roche 
Bros, was giving them a 
very informative program 
about cooking for one or 
two as well as shortcuts to 

shopping and food pre- 
paration. 

There was a question 
and answer period after- 
ward followed by a 



for disposition" Dec. 21 
1998 not be sold. This is a 
very valuable piece of land. 
Being a real-estate broker 
for many years I would say 
this piece of land is being 
sold far under the price it is 
worth. 

I am a senator for the 
Silver Haired Legislature. 

There is a great need for a 
new fire station. I live in a 
seniors building in Wollas- 



ton, and I feel the citizens in 
this city should be told how 
vital the fire department is 
to us, because they are al- 
ways available in emergen- 
cies for seniors. 

I am recommending that 
Plot 35-Plan 1126-1120 
Hancock St. 24,535 Sq. Ft. 
be taken off the market and 
the proposed sale for 
$550,000 be withdrawn 
Aug. 2 at the City Council 
meeting; I also urge con- 



cerned citizens be present at 
this meeting and recom- 
mend this site be available 
for a new fire station, be- 
cause of its location on a 
main street and in a down- 
town area. If this city- 
owned property is sold it 
will be a loss to the taxpay- 
ers. 
Sabina Kavanagh Stenberg 
Senator, Silver Haired 
Legislature 



A Most Enjoyable Program 



delightful lunch that Ms. 
Deaner prepared for them. 
She was presented with 
a bead necklace that one 
of the center's group made 
in appreciation for a lovely 
afternoon. 



The senior group meets Sro"P called 
on Tuesday and Friday. ^^"®^ 
They crochet baby blan- 
kets, string various bead 
necklaces, do chair exer- 
cises on Tuesdays and on 
Fridays they have a choral 



The Eye 



This is sponsored by 
The Quincy Elder Ser- 
vices. 

Helen Warshauer 

Volunteer at the Center 



Will Be Closed Saturdays 

During August. 
Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



July 15-21 

i^l962 
37 Years Ago 



Quincy*s 
Yesterdays 

Bargain Center 

Plans Store 
Outside Quincy 

By PAUL HAROLD 

Joseph Coppleman, president of the Bargain Center, 
angered by the city's "complete disregard" for his store's 
parking needs, said he would locate stores outside Quincy 
Center. He recently purchased i la-^— — .i— 

a 40,000 square-foot store in 
Somerville. 

Coppleman projected that 
the diversification outside the 
city would reduce customers 
coming to Quincy Center by a third and would eliminate a 
number of jobs at the Quincy store. 

He concluded by saying that he had "given up hope of 
getting parking here." 

PAINE SELECTED TO HEAD HOSPITAL 

Paul Hurley, chairman of the Quincy City Hospital Board 
of Managers, announced that Harlan Paine, age 47, was the 
board's choice for director. He said that Mayor Amelio Delia 
Chiesa would make the appointment next week. 

Former administrator of the Winchester Hospital, Paine 
was selected from a field of 60 applicants. He will replace 
Dr. Joseph Leone at a salary of $18,000. 
COURT BLOCKS INCINERATOR AT QUARRY 

The Superior Court permanently enjoined the city from 

building an incinerator at Hardwick's Quarry, noting that 

such a use was barred from the Residence B zoning. The 

court set aside the city's recent attempt to re-zone the land 

"city owned land." 

City Solicitor Douglas Randall urged an appeal, but 
Mayor Delia Chiesa said he would first meet with oitj' 

councillors concerning an appeal. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Botti Co. was the low bidder for the construction of the 
new Atlantic fire station, at $135,800. The entire cost of 
construction including the land and pilings was estimated at 
$150,000. . . Congressman James Burke, John McCormack 
and Thomas O'Neill urged the Navy to send conversion 
work to the Fore River shipyard. They noted the critical 
unemployment situation and the need to retain highly quali- 
fled skilled employees at the yard. . . Lt. Governor Ed>»^fd 
McLaughlin was the main speaker at the friendship dinner at 
the Morrisette Post for Councillor James McCormack who 
was a candidate for state senate. . . A daughter was bom at 
Quincy City Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Brillo of 
Germain Ave. . . The comer of Washington and River Streets 
was dedicated in memory of Pvt. M. Kenneth (Buddy) Hom. 
The ceremonies were conducted by the AM VETS under the 
leadership of Commander Anthony Famigletti. . . The new 
home of Congregation Adas Shalom on Adams St. was 
undergoing renovations to be ready for the High Holiday 
services in September. Amdd Kaplain was chairman of the 
building committee. . . Mrs. James Mullaney and Mrs. John 
Sulger were co-chairmen for the GOP Women's Evening 
Club's mmmage sale at 1 1 Revere Rd. (formerly Westland's). 
. . The new professional building at 66 McGrath Highway 
housed the offices of dentists. Dr. Sumner Hirshberg, Dr. 
Howard Paul and Dr. Thomas Heidker. . . Area lawyers took 
out nomination papers for Distrjct Attorney based on rumors 
that Myron Lane was in line for a judgeships and would not 
be a candidate for re-election. . . Parents' night at Merrymount 
Park playground included a diorama competition. Mike 
Linnane's entry was called "Mike's Zoo.". . . Blood donors 
from the Quincy K of C were Louis Sordillo, Frank Reed, 
Malachy Creaven and Terry Paglia. . . Walter Hannon of 
Albion Rd., president of Hannon Tire, was a candidate for 
state representative. . . The city extended its mbbish disposal 
contract with Marinucci Brothers, pending bids on a new 
contract. . . Frank Findlay and Jim Squatrito oo-chaired 
Blessed Sacrament's annual Tombola. Rev. Edward Dowd 
was honorary chairman. . . Lou Cassani and Ken Fallon, Jr. 
headed up the Quincy South Shore Chamber of Conunerce's 
37th annual outing, held at the Weymouth Fairgrounds. . . 
Highlight of parents' night at Columbia Playground was the 
cookout prepared by Frank "Sonny" Rusconi. . . Mary Yule 
of Franklin St. died at age 101. Having purchased an auto- 
mobile in 1909, she was believed to be the first woman in the 
city to own a car. . . Ave Marie Council ^wnsored a trip to 



the Red Sox- Yankee game for West Quincy Youth. 



Page 6 Til* Qulnoy 8iu& Thursday, July 15, 1999 




'^■^pm 




STORYTELLER LARKY HODGES will present a program of fiinny stories Tuesday, July 
20 at 7 p.m. at the Adams Shore Branch Library, 519 Sea St. 

Storyteller Series Continues 
At Adams Shore Library 




The 13th season of the 
Summer Storytellers Series 
continues with Storyteller 
Larky Hodges Tuesday, July 
20 at 7 p.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library 519 
Sea St. 

Hodges will present a 
program of her favorite 
funny stories The program 
is for families with children 
ages five and older. 

At the same time a Pa- 
jama Time Storyhour with 
Dottie Moynihan will be 
offered for younger siblings 
accompanied by an adult 
and families with children 

under ogc ol tlVC. "ClfCUS 

Tales" is the theme for this 
week. Stories from under 
the big top will be comple- 
mented by a shape and color 
clown craft. 

Registration for the fol- 
lowing craft programs and 
special presentation by sto- 
ryteller/actress Carole De- 
Ceglia will begin on Mon- 
day, July 19. Due to con- 
struction at the main library 
most programs will be held 
at the Adams Shore Branch. 
Registration for all pro- 
grams will be held at the 
North Ouincy Branch 381 



Hancock St., in person or by 
phone at 376-1320 during 
library hours. 

Up coming Programs: 
Monday, Aug. 2 at 
10:30 a.m. at the Wollaston 
Branch Library, 41 Beale 
St.: Carole DeCeglia will 
present "Storytelling with 
Little Miss Muffet" a pro- 
gram of stories and nursery 
rhymes for the youngest 
children. Best suited for 
ages 1-5. Registration is 
required. 

Thursday, Aug. 12 at 1 
p.m. at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library, 519 Sea St.: 
Craft program. Decorate a 

wooden treasure chest. Ages 
7 and older. Registration is 
required. 

Wednesday, Aug. 18 at 
10:30 a.m. at the Adams 



Shore Branch Library: 

Modeling Mania. Pre- 
schoolers accompanied by 
an adult are invited to get 
their hands messy with a 
variety of modeling com- 
pounds. Squish, squash, 
mash and roll using your 
hands and various tools. 
Please dress appropriately 
for such a messy activity. A 
tee shirt outgrown by an 
older sibling makes a great 
preschool size smock. Reci- 
pes for all compounds will 
be available for rainy day 
fun at home. Registration is 
required. 

Thursday, Aug. 26 at 1 
p.m. at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library: 

Craft program. Try your 
hand at watercolor painting. 
Ages 7 and older. Registra- 
tion is required. 



"TWO OF A KIND," David and Jenny Heitler-Kkvans will appear at a luncbtime concert 
July 22 on the Uwn at the Thomas Crane Public Ubrary, Quincy Center. 

*Two Of A Kind' Lunchtime 
Concert On Library Lawn 



Two of a Kind, a nation- 
ally touring husband-wife 
duo from Philadelphia, will 
appear in concert Thursdav, 
July 22, from 12:30 to 1:30 
on the front lawn of the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary in Quincy Square. 

David and Jenny Heitler- 
Klevans have been singing 
together since 1987. Chil- 
dren and adults alike enjoy 
their harmonious song- 
making and energetic per- 
formances. Accompanying 
themselves on guitar in 
styles that range from folk 



to rap, from blues to ca- 
lypso, they share songs 
about the environment, 
peace and friendship, and 
cultures around the world. 
Two of a Kind has three 
recordings to its credit, two 
for children and one for 
adults. 

The concert series con- 
tinues on July 29th with 
recording and video artist 
Lucie Therrien, who will 
entertain with music in 
French and in English. Her 
repertoire includes tradi- 
tional, contemporary and 
original songs that reflect 



the culture ot French 
speaking people in Canada, 
the States, France and Cre- 
ole areas. New England folk 
singer, Jim Douglas, con- 
cludes the series on August 
5th with a concert of tradi- 
tional and contemporary 
folk songs. 

Concerts will be held at 
the Adams Shore Branch 
Library, 519 Sea Street, in 
case of inclement weather. 
They are free and accessi- 
ble. Concertgoers are wel- 
come to bring picnics, lawn 
chairs, and sun shades. 



Hospital Auxiliary Plans 
Towel, Linen Sale 



14 Residents On UMass Amherst Dean's List 



The Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary, in conjunction 
with Jordan Textiles 
Division of Wearguard, 
will hold a towel, sheets 
and linens sale Thursday, 
July 22 from 8 a.m. to 4 



p.m. in the hospital's 
Education Center. 

The public is invited. 

Proceeds from the sale 
will benefit patient care. 
For more information, call 
376-5509. 



Fourteen Quincy resi- 
dents were recently named 
to the Dean's List at The 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst. 

They are: 

Gina M. Bermingham; 
Stephen Chan; William J. 
Hyman; Mark E. Jolly; Tina 



Katsarikas; Johnny H. Lee; Lan Sze So; Li Wei Tang; 

Lisa M. Renzi; Amanda M. Eric L Wong; Eva Wong; 

Rork; Michelle F. Sergeant; Lai Ying Yu. 

Julie Freitas On Dean's List 

Julie E. Freitas of Quincy ^ege, Rhode Island, 
is on the spring semester She is a junior computer 

Dean's List at Bryant Col- infonnation systems major. 





CLiffoxd i 

• Elegant Designs 

• Gift Baskets 

• Roses Our Specialty 

1-800-441-8884 

Worldwide Delivery 

479-8884 

1229 HANCOCK ST., 

QUINCY, MA 02169 



Mention this ad 

and receive a 

15% discount 

on your 

wedding flowers 



FLORISTS 



FLOWERS by HELEN 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For A II Occasions Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



JEWELRY 



Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 786-7942 

Handicapped Accessible 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 
761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

773-7620 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



Photographiy 

^^ studio 

679 Hancock Street, Quincy 



(Wollaston) 
479-6888 



nSHERMbWS 
PIATTER 

A colossal helping d golden fried shrimp, scallops, scrod, 

dam strips, onion rings and one of our fresh-made crab cakes. 

Send with French Fries and cole slaw. 

No Pisb Tales here.,, 
just great Cape Cod CoolHng! 

N: 



RESTAURANTS 



CAPE COD , 



COOKING 



LIVERY 




KERRI LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

LIMOUSINES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
M Pauenger Stretch Limousines - Town Can • Vans • Spcciaky Vehicles 
Wcddk^ • Proas • Annivmaries • Night Out 
• Baby Armab • Conceits • Aiqiort * Specials Occasions 

6 1 7-472-1 118 Fax: 6 1 7-479-0288 




Serving Bnaltfast Lunch & Dinner 

lEYMOirrH • oH 16, Mrth e«t M He. 18 

PLYMOVIB • 25 SiMwr SL li the Joki Ctfvcr tai^ 

. Falnootfa • HyMiis • Tvaootii • Orleans^ 
Xr^ www.lieaitiiiiketik com 



Thunday.July 15,1999 TIm Qulnojr Sun Page? 



SceiAi- 




CIVIL WAR COUPLE •• Gregory Lynes of the 22nd 
Volunteer Massachusetts Infantry and Ranger Crystal 
Halloweil at the Adams Mansion during a recent Civil War 
re-enactment 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Tom Gorman) 

Altrusa International Club 
Presents Awards, Installs Officers 

Sandy Jarvinen, treasurer, 
Lil Greene, secretary. 
Those on the Board of 
Directors: Peg Karalexis, 
Peg Shine and Jean York. 
Sue Duggan was installed 
as immediate past 
president. 

Altrusa International is 
a volunteer service organ- 
ization of executive and 
professional people ded- 
icated to improving their 
communities through per- 
sonal service. 

For more information 
about the club, call 617- 
472-4755. 



The Altrusa Inter- 
national Club recently 
presented Community Ser- 
vice Awards and installed 
officers. 

Those receiving awards 
were, Sean Patrick 
Donovan, Quincy High 
School, received the $300 
stipend awards. Alexie 
Mendoza and Kelly Ho, 
both of Quincy High 
School, each received a 
gift certificate from Rogers 
Jewelry in Quincy Center. 

Officers installed were: 
Fran Meade, president, 
Pat Peers, vice president. 



Sharon MassadI Lesley Graduate 



Sharon Massaadi of Dar- 
row St., Houghs Neck was 
awarded a Bachelors in 
Human Development degree 
at Lesley College. 

She is the wife of Hassan 
Massaadi and mother of 



Anas Massaadi. 

She received a Who's 
Who Award of American 
Colleges at Fisher College 
in 1995 and is finishing a 
Master's Degree in educa- 
tion at Lesley. 



Sharon Lee On Colby Dean's List 



Sharon K. Lee of Quincy 
has been named to the 
Dean's List for the spring 
semester at Colby College. 

Lee, a member of the 
Class of 2002, is the 
daughter of Man Lee and 



Yuen Chan-Lee. A graduate 
of North Quincy High 
School, she is majoring in 
biology with a concentration 
in environmental science 
and minoring in administra- 
tive science. 





CAROL HERBAI, Quincy Hospital Auxiliary President, 
presents a checic for $25,000 to Jeflkvy Doran, CEO, at the 
recent Auxiliary Spring Luncheon. The money wiU he used 
to purchase new mattresses for patient beds throughout the 
hospital. The auxiliary is a group of volunteers who raise 
Ainds for programs and services at the hospital 

Kathleen Scarnici Graduates 
From Gordon College 



JENNIFER LARAIA and GLEN DOYLE 

(Mclntyre Studio) 

Jennifer LaRaia Engaged 
To Glen Doyle 



The engagement of 
Jennifer Lynn LaRaia and 
Glen Keith Doyle is 
announced by her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. William 
LaRaia of Quincy. Mr. 
Doyle is the son of Mrs. 
Catherine Doyle of Quincy 
and Phil Doyle of 



Weymouth. 

Miss LaRaia graduated 
from Quincy High School 
and a former member 
relations counselor of 
AAA. 

Mr. Doyle is a graduate 
of Quincy High School and 
is a sub-contractor. 



Kathleen Scarnici, 
daughter of Larry and Pat 
Scarnici of Sunnyside Rd., 
Quincy, recently received a 
bachelor's degree in busi- 
ness administration from 
Gordon College. 

A 1995 graduate of 
Archbishop Williams High 



School, Scarnici was a 
member of the varsity swim 
team and a part of a ministry 
to the deaf while at Gordon. 
She also worked as an iniera 
in the admissions office. 

Kathleen plans to be 
married in September. 



Nicole Green Receives Suffolk Degree 

Nicole M. Green of she is the daughter of Rich- 
Quincy was awarded the ard and Janet Green of 
degree of Bachelor of Fine Quincy. 

Arts at the recent com- 

mencement exercises of 
Suffolk University held at 
The FleetCenter in Boston. 



A 1994 graduate of 
North Quincy High School, 



NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line of Supplies 
Free Estimates 



LITTLE WILLOWS 
PftESCHOOLVdv 

77M173 yl^ 

; SU/MMER FUM ^ 

2 mm k P/T 9— lout, 

2 and 3 Dty Progranw 

UoMisad SMnng^SnwH Qroup* 

ALSO ACCEPTINQ FALL 
REGISTRATIONS 

WMkly ThwnM, FMd Trips, 
Cnfts, Painting, and FunI 

Our ctirricuium it i miigrmd wHh your 
Vary Importani Praachoolar in mind 

SO Willow St -WoNaston 



Noh) Open 




at the 



Wi'sicni 



Adams Inn 



29 Hancock St.. North Quincy. MA 02171 

617-32d-0269 

"Enjoy Poolsidc Service with a Smile and a Sunset" 

Steaks. 5&Q Chicken. Ka-bobs & Morel 

Open 7 day* for Lunch & Dinner 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Wed.. July 14 - Mark and Sheila 

Thurs., July 15 - Brook Street Band 

FrI.. July 16 - Chris McNeil 

Sat.. July 17 - Joe Lundbohm 

Sun., July 1& - Island Sounds 



G J. Coddington's 



FAMILY RESTAURANT (617) 472-9950 

Kitchen Under New Management... Exciting New Specials! 

Featuring . . . Pasta • Seafood • Chicken • Prime Rib 



20% OFF Your Entire Bill 

5-9pm Daily 

with this coupon. Excluding beverage, alcohol & tax. Gratuity based on full value. 
One coupon per customer, not valid with other promotions or discounts. Exp. 7/31/99 



Outdoor Patio Dining in Historic Quinq^ Center 
Private Function Room Available FREE Validated Parking 

1250 HANCOCK STREEt, QUINCY CENTER 







20% Off 

Au Remt Prooucts 

Pivs CHOOsi mm M tfssommn 
Of piioimmMftL pmKMn 

Women's Mair Cuts stuffing «/:^.... 

Monday Special starting tt. 

Eurafiean Color starting at. 

Polls starting at.,,. 

Highlights starting at. 

Perms (ineiuang cut) starting at,,,,,,.,,. 

Make-over (Ftoa mtka-cm with « tS0.00 mtka-up purehu^ 



!•••••■•••••••••••■••••••••••••••••••••«•••••••••••••••• I 



I — ••••••—••»••——»»••••♦• — »•• > •••••••••• » ••••••— •——• — •• 



>••••»■»» — ••—••—#♦»—»»♦♦•»#••>•••••■»•••• — •••—••' 



'—••»••••—»»•» — ♦•»»»•—•••••••••••• — ——••••*»•*• 



♦20°° 



Men's Haircuts»««»»«««.w«...iw »..«»»»,»»»»,»....».».«.«.. .^..«.«»««»«.^...««tiS 

Tues(lBy & Thursihy S|>eeials starting at,..,„„„„„„ ^..^12°° 

Brithi Packages Available • Also featuring a full sen/lee nail division 
We carry a full line of hair care products 

AVE DA 



KMS 



n£'^S 



CtttMrtftl«rp^(9MiAiiif^1Hi^^Q(^ 



Pages Tli« Qulnoy Sun Thunday, July 15, 1999 




Arts In The Parks 
Program Starts Today 



Geri's Tomato Quiche 



It was a shower to die for in Boston at 
one of the old BU apartments sometimes 
visited by presidents. The elegant 
surroundings and an actual parking space 
made it all the better. 

And so it was when all of this 
delicious food came out of the gourmet 
type kitchen. It was our son-in-law's 
sister Joanne's shower and their mother 
Geri's recipe that is featured today in 
what I thought was the most delicious 
quiche ever! 

Geri's Tomato Quiche 

1 single pie crust 

2 tablespoons margarine 
1 large onion (chopped) 

1 large tomato (chopped) 

salt to taste 

pinch of thyme 

1/2 teaspoon tarragon, 1 teaspoon basil 

3/4 grated Romano cheese 

1 1/2 cup grated swiss cheese 



1 cup milk 

3 eggs 

1 teaspoon soy sauce 

1 large tomato sliced 

Line a 9" pie plate with the crust. 

Saute the onion in the margarine for a 
couple of minutes. Add the chopped 
tomato, salt, herbs and simmer covered 
for five minutes. Cool as you do the 
following. 

In a bowl, beat the eggs, milk soy and 
add the cheeses and the cool tomato 
mixture. Place the sliced tomato on the 
bottom of the pie crust, then pour the rest 
of the ingredients over it. 

Bake in a 350 degree oven until firm 
(about 45 minutes). 

(Marie D'Olimpio's cookbook with 
recipes featured in The Quincy Sun is 
available at the Fruit Basket (near Star 
Market), Previte's Market on Sumner St., 
and Nanci's Barbershop, Elm St., 
Braintree.) 



The city's fifth annual 
Arts in the Parks program 
will begin its summer sea- 
son Thursday, July 15 at the 
Wendall Moses Playground, 
Squantum, announce Mayor 
James Sheets and the 
Quincy Park and Recreation 
Board. 

Arts in the Parks pro- 
gram will travel to a park 
location in each of the city's 
six wards. 

Tne rest of the schedule: 

• Tuesday, July 20, 
LaBrecque Field, Houghs 
Neck. 

• Thursday, July 22, 
Bradford St. playground. 
South Quincy. 

• Tuesday, July 27, 
Bishop Field, Montclair. 

• Thursday, July 29, 
O'Rourke Field, West 
Quincy. 

• Tuesday, Aug. 3, 
Beechwood Knoll School, 
Wollaston. 



All shows begin at 6:30 
p.m. 

"These programs bring 
traditional recreational op- 
portunities for the whole 
family directly to the neigh- 
borhoods. They are free, 
fun-filled special events to 
be enjoyed by all," said 
Recreation Director Barry 
Welch. 

This year's show will 
feature two separate acts: 
the Dan Foley Juggling 
Show and the Sticky Skillet 
Swing Orchestra. 

Dan Foley is a comic 
juggler who has traveled all 
over the world and has ap- 
peared in Fox's "The 
World's Funniest" televi- 
sion show. His juggling ob- 
jects include lawn chairs, 
fruit and torches. 

The Sticky Skillet Swing 
Orchestra is a seven-piece 
group featuring Boston's 
finest jazz musicians. They 



play a variety of music in- 
cluding Cab Calloway, 
Duke Ellington, Count 
Basie, and their own origi- 
nal tunes. 

"Through the support of 
Mayor Sheets and the 
Quincy City Council, we are 
able to provide an enter- 
taining show for the whole 
family. I encourage people 
to bring their families to our 
Arts in the Parks and enjoy 
the music, comedy, and an 
ice cream all in a beautiful 
setting. It's a great way to 
spend a summer night," said 
Park, Forestry and Cemetery 
Director Thomas Koch. 

The park and recreation 
departments will provide 
refreshments at each show. 
Attendees are encouraged to 
bring their own lawn chair 
or blanket. 

For more information, 
call the Park Department at 
376-1254 or Recreation De- 
partment at 376-1394. 




FLAVIN Mb^ 

Insurance Agency 

Complete Insurance Service 

Since 1925 

AUTO • HOME • CONDO 

BUSINESS • FLOOD 

UMBRELLA • LIFE 

Protecting Your Dream Home 

Offering Premium Discounts 

For Auto & Homeowners 
For Premium Quotations Call 

Flavin & Flavin /\rk/\ 

1085 Hancock St 479-1000 
Quincy Center 



Mariano Pediatric Care Amendment Passes 



State Rep. Ron Mariano 
announces that he was 
successful in passing an 
amendment to the House 
version of the managed 
care reform bill. 

As the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives 
debated H4509 (An Act 
Protecting Patients 
Rights), Mariano moved to 
amend the bill to include 
a provision he had filed as 
a freestanding bill earlier 
this season. 

Mariano's Amendment, 
known as the Pediatric 
Specialty Care Amend- 
ment ensures that children 
with medical conditions 
are treated appropriately. 



I 



j-^eace ojf Jl illind 



Face & Body Spa 

Massage Therapy • Facials 

• Manicures • Pedicures 

• Waxing • Electrolysis 

• Make-up Application 




peycxiiQ ' 

Bocuici " 



AVE DA Cellex-C 
587 HANCOCK STREET, NORTH QUINCY • 61 7-773-8882 =*' 



Why Trust Your Memories To Anyone Else! 



1/ Mforlr li^nt On Site • 19 Years ixperieme 

1 Hour Photo Finishing • Photo Restoration 

• Slides From PowerPoint 
& Harvard Graphics 

• Internet Ready Photos 

• Videos From Pictures 
Slides & Movies 

• Instant Passport Photos 



Same Day Slides (E-6) 
Enlargements 
Reprints 
Dupe Slides 
Slides From Prints 



PhotoQuick of Quincy 

©17-472-7131 

1363 Hancock St. Quincy Center 

Visit us at www.p^otoquickquincy com 
Hours: M-F 8:30-6pm • Sat 10-3pm 




"Relatively few children special diseases, con- 
require specialized care, ditions, and disabilities." 
but for those who do, it is Mariano asked his 

imperative they have the colleagues to consider 

their own families' 



ability to receive 
appropriate care from 
providers with training and 
experience in treating 
children, not adults," 
Mariano said. 

From the floor of the 
House Chamber, Mariano 
urged hik colleagues to 
adopt the amendment to 
"ensure that health plans 
provide children with 
access to pediatricians as 
primary care providers, 
and when needed - 
pediatric specialists who 
have training and expertise 
in treating children's 



own 

position. "If your child had 
a heart condition, you 
would want your child to 
have access to pediatric 
cardiologist and a 
pediatric cardiovascular 
surgeon - providers whose 
careers have been devoted 



partisan issue. This issue is 
about doing what is right 
by our children and 
families." 

On the federal level, 
both Congressional 
Democrats and Repub- 
licans have proposed 
managed care reform bills, 
which include guaranteed 
access to pediatric 
specialists for children. 



GRAKITE 
LOCK CO 



SERVICE 



MOBILE 



AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 

DEADBOLTSINSTAUED 
LOCKS REKEYED 
DOORaOSERS 
PANIC HARDWARE 

• AUTO KEYS nmo 

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM! 
755 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

472-2177 



t 



After being engrossed 
to treatmg such problems by the House, the bill now 
in children, not adults. The hgajs to a joint conference 
difference is significant. 

"When a cardiologist 
treats an adult, it is most 
often for an acquired heart 
condition. Whereas, when 
a child needs treatment, it 
is for a congenital heart 
defect - a condition the 
child was bom with." 

Mariano's colleagues 
agreed with the merits of 
his proposal and when the 
roll call was taken; the 



committee to iron out the 
differences between the 
House and Senate 
versions. Mariano said he 
is is optimistic that the 
amendment will ultimately 
be included in the final 
version. 

Also included in the 
managed care reform bill 
are: provisions to ensure 
that consumers of health 



amendment passed 159-0. services have continuity of 



When informed of the 
unanimous vote on his 
amendment, Mariano said. 
"This clearly is not a 




American Heart 
AssodadonJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



care if for some reason 
their physician is no longer 
enrolled with that health 
plan; a strong external 
appeals process to allow 
patients to seek an 
objective third-party re- 
view of their grievances; 
and adoption of a prudent 
lay person standard which 
gives patients unimpeded 
access to emergency care 
if they feel their condition 
warrants such services. 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 

[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $15.00 

[ 1 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $17.00 [ 1 CHECK ENCLOSED 

[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $20.00 [ ] PLEASE BILL ME 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
■ 
I 

B 
■ 



2^2^^^Bfi 



Thursday, July 15, 1999 Tli« Qulncy Su»Page9 



Majors Ed, Florence Forster Begin Duties 

For New Salvation Army Leaders Quincy Like Home 



For Salvation Army 
Majors Ed Forster and Flo 
Forster, their new assign- 
ment to Quincy is a return 
home. They are natives of 
Somerville. 

Major Ed Forster was the 
commanding officer of the 
Salvation Army in Coshoc- 
ton County, Ohio, about a 
two-hour drive south of 
Cleveland, before he was 
appointed to the Quincy 
post, headquartered at 6 
Baxter St., which is the base 
for a couple hundred mem- 
bers, including a 25 -piece 
brass band which partici- 
pates in worship services. 

And before that, he 
served as editor-in-chief and 
literary secretary for the 
Salvation Army in Canada 
and Bermuda and was editor 
of the Army's national 
magazine, "The War Cry," 
for eight years. His wife 
served as the circulation 
director. 




Salvation Army MiO<>n ^ Forster and Flo Forsiter are 
the new community leaders in Quincy. The couple was in 
Coshocton County, Ohio, previously, but they both grew 
up in Somerville. 

Prior to going to Canada, Army's national headquar- 



he was the dean of students 
at the Salvation Army's 
College for Officers' 
Training in Suffern, N.Y. 
He also has served at the 



ters outside Washington in 
Alexandria, Va., as assistant 
editor-in-chief. 

The major has served as 



Chris Peter Memorial 
Blood Drive July 27 



Charlie and Trudy Peter 
will host the 15th Annual 
Chris Peter Memorial 
Blood Drive July 27 from 2 
to 8 p.m. at St. Thomas 
Aquinas Hall. 

The purpose of the 
blood drive, an American 
Red Cross drive, is two 
fold: to remember Chris 
Peter and to help the blood 
banks as Chris Peter did 
before his death. 

Peter was killed in 1984 



when a drunk driver hit the 
driver's side of Chris' truck. 
His friend in the 
passenger's seat survived, 
but Chris did not. 

The drive will have 
homemade goodies and 
free child care while a 
parent donates. Also, St. 
Thomas Aquinas Hall on 
Darrow Street in 
Houghsneck is air- 
conditioned. 



For more information 
call Charlie or Trudy at 
(617) 471-9586. 



pastor and community 
leader in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Kearny, N.J., and Man- 
chester, N.H., during his 
career. 

Seven years ago, he 
spent 11 weeks in London, 
at the International College 
for Salvation Army Offi- 
cers, where he was elected 
president of that group. 

He has published close to 
1,000 magazine articles 
which have been published 
internationally during the 
past 30 years, and in 1996, 
he co-edited a book on ad- 
ditions, "Every Sober Day 
Is A Miracle." The book, he 
explained, includes 99 vi- 
gnettes of individuals who 

overcame various addic- 
tions. The last page is blank, 
to allow the book owner to 
write his own story. The 
book, which has sold more 
than 60,000 copies, was 
published by a Christian 
publishing house, Tyndale 
Publishing. 

"It was love at first 
sight," he said when he met 
his future wife. At the time, 
he was 10, and they were 
together in the Salvation 
Army Sunday school. "But 
it took a while before we 



began dating." They were 
married at age 22. 

Flo Forster also gradu- 
ated from Somerville High 
School and the Salvation 
Army's College for Offi- 
cers' Training. "She earned 
her rank in her own right," 
he said. 

In Quincy, she will be 
responsible for all the 
women's programs and will 
assist in preaching. She also 
will be involved in the 
League of Mercy, which 
offers visitation to those 
Salvationists in nursing 
honles and hospitals. She 
also will coordinate the 
Sunday school, Sunbeams 
and teen Bible class. 

"When I learned of my 
appointment to Quincy, I 
said, 'It's great to be [going] 
home,'" said Major Forster. 
"I had no say about it. When 
I was appointed to Canada, 
it was a Thursday, and the 
next day I was on my way." 

The average stay at a 
particular assignment is 
three years, but the Forsters 
are hoping they will stay 
five years or more. 

But he's not close to re- 
•tirement. Far from it. An 
athlete in his early 50s, he 



still plays ice hockey and in 
1992 ran the Washington 
Marathon in three hours, 50 
minutes. At the Boston 
Marathon this year, he met 
his daughter-in-law at 
Heartbreak Hill and unoffi- 
cially ran the remaining 
distance. 

The Forsters have four 
married children — a 
daughter, Joyce Hartshorn 

who is a Salvation Army 
officer in Niagara Falls; 
another daughter. Heather 
Huang, a social worker in 
New York City who is 
studying at Columbia Uni- 
versity for her master's de- 
gree in social work; and 
identical twin sons who 
graduated from Yale Uni- 
versity. Jeff Forster is 
studying for his master's 
degree at Carnegie-Mellon 
University in Pittsburgh, 
and Drew Forster taught 
Spanish at Lincoln-Sudbury 
High School and served as 
vice principal at Hopkinton 
High School before recently 
deciding to pursue full-time 
a campus ministry with the 
Salvation Army in Massa- 
chusetts. The Forsters are 
residing in Braintree at 27 
Windemere Circle. 



Marvel lleauty Shop 

) & up 



• ShiinipiH) iS^ Cul 

I xpcnciHCil Hail (Olorists 
ih. an I'tnphiiMs on ( Ornc liw coloring 
\(i/i(l(iic'l /'(iiiii!'^ • f >/)(■// 6 t/iivs in S:iHiiini 



5 ( on \(;i: am:., qunc ^ • 617-472-9681 




^ 



FoottNotes 



by Dr. Richard A Hacker 

Surgeon-Podknrist 



ALBERT'S DISEASE 

Albert's Disease is an inflam- oid to relieve symptoms, 
mation of the bursa (fluid-filled Early detection and conection of 
sac) that sits in front of the spot a foot problem like Albert's Disease 
where the Achilles tendon at- offer patients the best access to oom- 
taches to the heel bone. The plete health. Left untreated, bursitis 
Achilles tendon connects the calf and other foot problems can immo- 
muscle to the heel. Any condition bilize a person and discourage regu- 
that puts stress on this tendon lar activity. We want to return you 
te.g., rheumatoid arthritis or stiff to, and keep you in good health. Im- 
shoes) can cause Albert's Dis- prove your lifestyle by calling us at 
ease. A person with Albert's Dis- 617-472-3466. There is no good rea- 
ease will feel swelling and son to keep on suffering from foot 
warmth at the back of the heel, pain, not when experienced, com- 
To help reduce pain and inflam- passionate care is available at 110 
mation, apply warm or cool com- West Squantum St., No. Quincy. 
presses to the area. Taking aspi- P.S. The human body has more 
lin or ibuprofen and keeping pfe»- than 1 SO bursae to help cushion the 
sure off the area can also help the movement between the bones, ten- 
inflammation »ibside. If pain per- dons, and muscles near the joints, 
sists, a doctor may inject the in- The most common site of bursitis is 
flamed bursa with a cortiooster- the shoulder. 



And you get the gifts! 

OPEN A FtRST CHOICE CHECKING ACCOUNT 
AND GET YOUR CHOICE OF 

o 



Koozic Six- Pack 




OR 



ALONG WITH THESE BENEFITS 




Tote Bag 



liW^^H 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart fn 


Smoking. 



No minimum balance 

Free first order of 50 checks 

No monthly service charge 

No charge for check processing 

Free onsite ATM access 

Free ATM access at SUM® and 000?^*^ terminals 

Overdraft protection 

Direct Deposit 

JOIN US JULY 19 THROUGH 24 FOR 
FOOD & GIFTS 



62 Clay Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 
617.786.0251 

wunv. bridgewatercu. com 




BRIDGEWATER 
CREDIT UNION 



'Gifts available during the promotional period and only at the WoUaston Office. 

Membership required. 



Page 10 Tl&« QuiiAoy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1999 



Gillis, Agnitti Honored i 

Mayor's Annual Boy Scout Breakfast 




SCOUT HONORS -- John Gillis, Norfolk County Commissioner and former Quincy city 
clerk, and Quincy businessman Anthony Agnitti were honored for their dedication to the 
ideals of scouting at the Mayor's Annual Boy Scout Breakfast aboard the USS Salem. 
From the left are City Councillor Paul Harold, event co-chairman; Gillis, Mayor James 
Sheets, Agnitti and John Keenan, the mayor's executive secretary and event chairman. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 





JOHN GILLIS 



A REVERE BOWL was presented to Mayor James Sheets 
by event co-chairman James Barbieri for his long-time 
sponsorship of the annual Boy Scout Breakfast 

(Boston Minuteman Council photo) 




MARK ROBERTS, 12-year-old member of Troop 24, First Church of Squantum, was the 
scout speaker at the Mayor's Annual Boy Scout Breakfast. With him here are Harold 
Pinkham, District Director Boy Scouts of America; John Keenan, event chairman; Mayor 
James Sheets and James Barbieri of the Horizon Bank, event co-chairman. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 





ANTHONY AGNim 



SECOND CLASS SCOUT Mark Richards of Troop 24, 
First Church of Squantum, delivering the scout's message 
at the Mayor's Annual Boy Scout Breakfast, said: "When 
I was in Cub Scouts, we promised to help other people and 
to do our duty to God and our country. Sometimes it's 
hard to keep these promises but the Cub Scout motto is 
'Do your besL^ And every day that I'm a scout, my best 
gets better." 

(Boston Minuteman Council Photo) 



Maryann Ashworth On Dean's List 

Maryann Ashworth, Smith College, in North- A graduate of Quincy 

daughter of Bonnie and Jeff Hampton, for her academic High School, she is major- 

Ashworth of Quincy, was achievement for the 1998- ing in geology, 

named to the Dean's List at 99 school year. 



Joseph Innello Suffolk Cum Laude Graduate 

Joseph M. Innello of stration degree from Stone- the son of Anthony and 

hill College in 1991. He is Kathleen Innello of Quincy. 

Russell Patten Awarded 
Suffolk Law Degree 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



We're Having a 

LandCu'se 



with 




Senator Michael W. l^orrissey 



at 




\')fiiSj!}j 

^^^ . Bead, • Ba:>d& 




Braintree formerly of 
Quincy, was awarded the 
degree of Juris Doctor Cum 
Laude at the recent com- 
mencement exercises of 
Suffolk University held at 
The Fleet Center in Boston. 

A 1987 graduate of 
Quincy High School, In- 
nello received a bachelor of 
science in business admin i- 



Russell C. Patten of 
Quincy was awarded the 
degree of Juris Doctor at the 
recent commencement exer- 
cises of Suffolk University 
held at The FleetCenter in 



Boston. 

A 1996 graduate of Suf- 
folk University with a 
bachelor of science degree, 
he is the son of Russell and 
Donna Patten of Quincy. 



Thursday, July 22, 1999 

6-8pm 



Marina Bay, Quincy 

Traditional Summertime Cookout 

Donation $20 per person 

Paid and authorized by Tlie Conmiittec to Re-Elect Michael W. Momssey, P.O. Boi 215, North Quincy, MA 02171 



HEAD START PROGRAM 

Head Start is currently accepting applications for children 
ages 3-5 for the 1999-2000 school year. Enrollment is free 
to income eligible families from Quincy, Braintree, 
Weymouth, Hull and Milton. Parents of children with de- 
velopmental needs are encouraged to apply. 

Full day/full year programs are also available for eligible 
families. Fees are charged for some full-day programs. 
Transportation is offered to some programs. 

Breakfast and lunch are provided. 

For an application or further information 

Please call (617) 479-8181 ext. 150 

A Program of Quincy Community Action Programs, Inc. 



^^mm^ 



md^ 



Thursday, July 15, 1999 Tlw Qiiincy Wun Pagell 



He's Creating A 
Holocaust Memorial 



(Cont 'dfrom page I) 

I 

looking for someone to help 
set up the heavy pieces of 
wall and to dig holes for 
poles. 

He is also hoping to find 
someone to donate a piece 
of black granite into which 
he can have the names of 
the remaining survivors in- 
scribed. 

Part of the memorial is a 
compilation of children's 
writings, poems and Holo- 
caust drawings. Ezickson is 
in the process of triple lami- 
nating the pieces, and 
mounting them on slate. All 
pieces will be mounted on a 
gray wall. 

In his mind, he sees 
adding significant artifacts 
such as children's shoes 
piled high, symbolizing the 
children who were gassed at 
concentration camps. 

He also plans to have all 
writings appear in braille, as 
do many of the exhibits 
presently displayed on the 
strip of land. 

In addition, he'd like to 



create a timeline from 1933- 
1945 on a portion of the 
memorial, so that those not 
familiar with what happened 
during World War II will 
have a dateline to follow. 

Ezickson is aware he 
may run into opposition in 
erecting a reminder of the 
Holocaust. 

"Some people say, 
'David, you're looking for 
trouble putting this up,'" 
says Ezickson. He disa- 
grees. Unperturbed, he re- 
sponds, "If they tear it down 
it shows their ignorance, 
and we'll just fix it again." 

Plans for the memorial 
have gone through a series 
of changes. According to 
Ezickson, the Mayor of Je- 
rusalem was planning to 
help build a Peace Park 
here, and was going to try to 
import stone for the memo- 
rial. He wanted to create a 
catalyst for peace, but the 
plans fell through, and Ez- 
ickson continued with the 
memorial on his own. 

"My thanks have to go 
out to three teachers m par- 



ticular, and the students at 
Sterling Middle School," 
says Ezickson. "Paula 
Campbell, Sandra McNiece 
and Nicole Cobb are all 
teachers who teach about 
the Holocaust at the middle 
school." 

He says there were also 
some teachers who helped 
out with the project at At- 
lantic Middle School. 

In the future, Ezickson 
hopes to work toward 
building greater under- 
standing between the nu- 
merous religious communi- 
ties in Quincy by providing 
a forum whereby the differ- 
ent religious factions share 
information about each 
other. He for one would like 
to learn about the Christian 
season of Advent. 

Ezickson, who was re- 
cently appointed to the Hu- 
man Rights Commission, 
asks anyone interested in 
helping out on the Holo- 
caust memorial project, to 
contact him at 471-9539. 

And, he does need some 
help. 




Ij John Quinv\ Aiir 



^r community bStm 
board 



,.^^'T»*; 



«^.. 




"MAN'S HUMANITY" exhibit with a tribute to John Quincy Adams was established some 
time ago by David Ezickson just a few feet from his planned "Man's Inhumanity To Man" 
exhibit and Holocaust Memorial. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble) 



Morrisette Legion Post Awards 
$5,500 In Scholarships 



Siciliano, Staff Attend State 
Hurricane Preparedness Session 



Tony Siciliano, deputy 
director of the city's office 
of emergency management, 
and five staff members rep- 
resented Quincy at a hurri- 
cane preparedness exercise 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
the Framingham headquar- 
ters of the Massachusetts 
Emergency Management 
Agency. 

Others from Quincy in- 
cluded Scott Mercurio, Ste- 
phen Pasquale, Brian Wilk- 
osky, Christopher George 
and Dale Hayden. 

The two-day training 
program involved represen- 
tatives from federal, state, 
local governments as well as 
members of various volun- 
teer agencies that would be 
called upon during a storm 
emergency. 

For this program, held 
during Massachusetts Pre- 
paredness Week, the storm 
has been dubbed "Hurricane 
Janice." 

Today, MEMA and the 
New England Electric Sys- 



rAGNITTIi 

INSURANCE 

HOME 'AUTO 'BUSINESS 
LIFE •FINANCIAL 



tem is co-sponsoring a hur- 
ricane awareness conference 
for all the public utilities at 
the Marriott Hotel in West- 
borough. 

Last year, 10 hurricanes 
and four tropical storms 
occurred the Atlantic, and 
weather experts are pre- 
dicting another active hurri- 
cane season this year. The 

Atlantic hurricane season 
began June 1 and extends 
through Nov. 30. 

In his proclamation des- 
ignating this week as Mas- 
sachusetts Hurricane Pre- 
paredness Week, Gov. Paul 
Cellucci reminded all of the 
$1 billion in damage sus- 
tained during Hurricane Bob 
in 1991. Other storms 
threaten lives and property 
too. Flash floods, coastal 



erosion and power outages 
during and after hyrricanes 
lead to a further burden on 
residents. 

By learning emergency 
procedures and stocking 
necessary supplies useful in 
the event of a hurricane, 
citizens can mitigate dam- 
age, alleviate suffering and 
save lives, he said. 



The 1999 Morrisette Le- 
gion Post Scholarship Fund 
Committee awarded schol- 
arships totalling $5500, to 
1 1 graduates this year. 

They are: David R. 
Bonomi, Milton High 
School; Julia Bradford, of 
Hanover, Notre Dame' 
Academy; Jonathan Brillo, 
of Quincy, Boston College 
High School; Patrick J. 
Grossman, Quincy High 
School; Colleen A. Keenan, 
Hanover High School. 



Mark T. Mahoney, Nor- 

well High school; Courtney 
E. Paquette, of Quincy, No- 
tre Dame Academy; 
Amanda J. Petitti, Braintree 
High School; Jeffrey W. 
Russo, Quincy High School; 
Elizabeth M. Stone, Quincy 



High School; Maura Sulli- 
van, North Attleboro High 
School. 

All successful applicants 
are children or grandchil- 
dren of members of the 
Morrisette Post, West 
Quincy. 



David Vo Receives Degree 

David T. Vo of Quincy the recent commencement 

was awarded the degree of exercises of Suffolk Univer- 

Bachelor of Science in sity held at The FleetCenter 

Business Administration at in Boston. 






REPORT 

STREET UGHT 

OUTAGES 

24 hours, 
7days 

376-1490 






Established 
in 1960 

20 years under 
same ownership 




ALfreh 



reco $ 



DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

Starting at *4" 

1 1 :30anv3:00pm 
Monday - Saturday 

Famous for Home Cooking 
Generous Portions - Reasonable Prices 

Entertainment 

Wednesday through Sunday Nights 



*T^e5taurant b Lounge 
15 ^raMi'» dtreet. Quincy, MA 02169 • Tei. 412-W5 



Want to avoid checking fees! 




i» 



AitbMj L AgBhtl, CIC, UA 

Certified Insurance Counselor 
Licensed Insurance Advisor 

(mmAQDonoNnoniNsnMM] 
covnuGiATcoiffinnvindCD 

ASK ABOUT OUR AlHX) AND 

HOMEOWNER INSURANCE 

DISCOUNT PROGRAMS 

24-HMr EBHfncy Accw 

77©-0123 
FRANKLIN ST^QUINCY. 



en in 
uincy 

at Granite 
Crossing! 



Direct Cbeddi^ 
means direct savings. 



Avoiding checking fees is easy. Simply direct yourself to 
South Shore Savings Banlc and anange for direct deposit of your 
paychecl(, social security check, or other regular payment to a 
Direct Checking Account. It's convenient . . . and a terrific value: 

To open your Direct 
Checking Account, stop 
by any of our convenient 
locations or call us today 




NO monthly fee 



NO per check fees 



NO minimum balance 



J 



Member FCmyOIF 



South Shore 

SAVINGS BANK 

A great community bank! 
(800) 660-7800 

East Bridgewater • East Weymouth • HanoverANlorwell 

North Wieymouth • Quincy • South Weymouth 

Weymouth • Weyrnouth Landing 



J 



P»gtl2 



Thunday, July 15, 1999 




I^EAL Estate 




Conway Remains State's 
Largest Independent 



Thomas Williams Realtors' 
'Affiliate Of The Year' 



Jack Conway and 
Company continues to be 
the largest independently 
owned real estate broker- 
age company in Massa- 
chusetts, according to 
annual ratings published 
by Real Trends magazine 
of Colorado. 

Conway was 125th 
among all U.S. companies. 

The 600-person Conway 
Family Group, including 
Ouincy, is headquartered 



in Norwell, and h as 36 
offices from Boston 
throughout the South 
Shore, Southeastern 
Massachusetts and Cape 
Cod. 

Conway's recent 30- 
second television com- 
mercial won a national 
award from MediaOne and 
also topped the Van- 
couver, Wash.-based "Top 
Of Mind Awareness 
(TOMA)" charts for name 



mvm 





Buying, Selling of Investing? 

Call Tom McForlond 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUiNCY 328-3200 




\^tN MOSCAROeUJ 

fsnfifm-Tfm 

f/emeoMOOo 

PROfissmM 70 ami 

328'f3f2 



Report Street Light Outages 

24 hours, 7 days 

376-1490 



WOLLASTON OFFICE 

Lynne Houghton, Manager 
Carol Cahill 
Margie Duffy 



Dave Andrews 
Richard Colarusso 
Sandra Fennelly 
Dan Goichman 
Corinne Getchell 
Beverly Joyce 
Dona Nightingale 
Jaimie Paz 
Donna Williams 



Carolyn Flaherty 
Mike Goodrich 
Melissa Higgins 
Ernie Light 
Patrick Mulkern 
Gloria Skoinick 
Osman Yesilcimen 



f 



Give One of Us a Call! 

r Jack .» 

Conway 



JACK CONWAY 

COMPANY, INC.™ 

Call for a Free 

Market Analysis! 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

wwwjackconway.com 



recognition in much of 
Eastern Massachusetts. 

Several other Massa- 
chusetts companies 
finished higher in the 
ratings, but were not 
independents. The Hunne- 
man Company was sold to 
NRT Corp. of Parsippany, 
N.J., Carlson Real Estate 
was sold to GMAC and 
DeWolfe New England is 
a publicly held stock 
company. 

Jack Conway and 
Company was founded in 
1957 in Hingham Square 
by one-time Boston sports- 
writer Jack Conway, who 
is still chairman and owner 
of the firm. The company 
completed $725 million in 
sales in 1998. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



FLAVIN & FIAVIN 

Real Estate 



Established 1925 







MICHAEL FLAVIN 
Full time real estate 

professional 

dedicated to helping 

you buy or sell. 

Call 479-1000 

Committed to 

homeawnership 



Atty. Thomas Williams, 
of the Law Office of 
Thomas F. Williams in 
Quincy, was named 1999 
Affiliate of the Year of the 
South Shore Association f 
Realtors at award cere- 
monies at the Summer 
House, Marina Bay, 
Ouincy. 

Williams, a former 
realtor member for 20 
years, changed his mem- 
bership to Affiliate in 
1998. 

He received the honor 
in appreciation for his 
outstanding service to the 
South Shore Association of 
Realtors. He is serving on 
SSAR's Education and 
Programs Committee. He 
helped to get the Realtor 
After Hours Program 
started by his contribution 
of an Irish band in March 
and donated the prize for 
the evening, a guest 
appearance on his radio 
program. 

Williams, an instructor 
in the Board's Continuing 
Education Program, par- 
ticipated every month in at 
least one course per series 
of 12 hours, teaching a 



PMI - GONE 



Licensed 

Appraiser will 

remove your 

PML 

Call Art Foley 

at Century 21 

Annex 

472-4330 



-CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Across fh>m Blockbuster & Quincy T 




MONTCLAIR 
Lots of room for the kids inside and out Spadoos 2 hmfly 
with separate utilities, new windows, roof; and Itatlis. Wliy 
not call and sec it now. $279,900. 



^%l 



Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

When you're #1 you can do things others can't 

See all our Ustings at: www.c21annex.coiii 




THOMAS WILLL\MS 

variety of courses. 

Williams is also in- 
volved in the community. 
He is a former Quincy city 
solicitor, a member and 

director of the Massa- 
chusetts Mortgage Asso- 



ciation, member of the 
Lion Club, the Overseers 
of the South Shore 
Hospital, the Board of 

Trustees of Norwell's 
Company Theatre. He is a 
WJDA Quincy radio 
personality, a director of 
Quincy Community Ac- 
tion, trustee of the Quincy 
Hospital Charitable Foun- 
dation, the Quincy 
Historical Society and the 
South Shore Economic 
Development Corporation. 
Present at the awards 
reception were his wife, 
Pat, and daughter Tiffany. 
Over 140 members, friends 
and guests were in 
attendance to honor 
Williams. 



Exterior Accents Add 
Value To A Home 



(NAPS) — ^Many homeown- 
ers only consider landscap- 
ing and painting projects to 
add curb appeal and value to 
their homes, but increasing 
a home's value does not have 
to be expensive or mainte- 
nance intensive. 

Landscaping projects pro- 
vide dramatic results to a 
home's exterior, but require 
lots of time to maintain and 
new expenses every year. 
However, simple exterior 
accents like shutters and door 
surrounds are effective archi- 
tectural and decorating tools 
without maintenance or 
future expense. Shutters, 
window headers, columns, 
and door surroimds add to a 
home's charm and character 
while adding to its value. 

Consider these ideas: 

• Windows play a major 
factor in the overall appear- 
ance of a home. Adding shut- 
ters makes windows look 
more prominent, while win- 
dow headers provide a more 
finished look. 

• The front door or entry- 
way makes a crucial first 



OpM 



impressicHi. Liven up this dull 
facade and create a more 
inviting look by framing 
entryways with a door sur- 
round. Colonial columns can 
be easily installed to provide 
depth and dimension with 
subtle el^ance. Columns can 
wrap around existing posts 
making it simple to give a 
quick and easy faceUfl. 

In the past, adding exterior 
accents was a miyor renova- 
tion project, but not anymore. 
Ibda/s exterior decor prod- 
ucts can be installed in 
minutes to almost any siding, 
including brick, aluminum, 
vinyl, stucco, and wood. Ex- 
terior decor products look 
great and are virtually main- 
tenance free. For a free prod- 
uct catalog, call Builders Edge 
at (800) 350-1706. 




Whin iiiiyini^ orSillimi, ihink. 



Ontug^ 




GUSCONFALONE 
RealEstaUConsubaia 



Annex Realty, Inc. 

49 Beak St, Quiocy, MA 02170 
617-47243386x1.310 
Call Gus for a FREE 
Market Evaluation jm 
of your property |j^ 




CKdNets 

m:^ ^ 

STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squantum, MA 02171 

[fllBl (617) 328-9400 gf 

A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WfTH 



T1iunday,Jiily IS, 1999 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Page 13 



Don't Drop the Ball... 

iG aMi^^e9&-&€ als-While They Last! 




ret 




Estat-e 





QUINCY CENTER 

Quincy Center Storefronts! 
1300 SF& 2200 SF next to 
Quincy municipal parking 
lot. On-site parking also 
available! Close to restau- 
rants, service suppliers & 
retailers. 
OflieRd at $349,000 




QUINCY 

Great visibility for your 
business! 1600 SF reUil 

storefront along Route 3A. 

Business B Zoned. Located 

along MBTA bus route. 

Oflered at $219,900 

or leaac at $2,200/month 




QUINCY 

Former restaurant just off of 

Hancock St. in N. Quincy. 2 

levels, 8,800 SF 10.995 SF 

lot includes lot directly 

across street. Business B 

zoned. 

Offered at $695,000 




NORTH QUINCY 

Hancock Street retail 
opportunity in great car and 
foot traffic area. 3,630 SF in 
first floor and basement. On- 
site parking. Business B 
zoned 
Offered at $349,000 





1 


j 




1 



QUINCY CENTER 

Hancock Street Qass A 
office space for lease. 2,600 
SFi, beautiful conference 
room, spacious bullpen area, 
convenient access by car or 
train, adjacent to municipal 
parking garage. 

For Lease at $14.5«/SF 




QUINCY 

Retail store with open floor 

plan, 3000 SF first floor 
space with additional 3000 

SF basement. Bustling 

Quincy Ave. location close 

to major several retailers, 

' 134 feet of frontage. 

Offered at $475,000 





QUINCY 

One-story brick office/ 

warehouse building. 

Business A zoned. 

6,641 SF gross building 

ana. 9,826 SF site. Ample 

^ parking. 

Reduced to $235,000 




QUINCY CENTER 

Great downtown storefronts. 

3 commercial/retail condos. 
Ranging in size from 865- 
891 SF. Just a short walk 
from parking facilities. 
Offered at $79,000 each 
or Combine for a Great 

Development Opportunity 




R e si dent i at Real Estate 

Thinking about selling? n6w's the time! Take advantage of this great 

offer. List your home with Flynn & Co. and get $500 back at the closing. 

It's like getting your own commission! Call 61 7-328-0600 today ! 



j List your home with 
I Flynh & Co. 
I and get $500 
I cash back! 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




Offer expires 8/31/99 




Call 617-328-0600 



$500 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Present this coupon 

at your closing '} 

and get a $500 rebate! | 



i*^ 




Daniel J« 
Flynn & Co., Ine. 



COMMERCIAL 


RESIDENTIAL 


SALES 


REAL ESTATE 


AND LEASING 


37 Billings Road 


32 Chestnut Street 


Quincy, MA 02171 


Quincy, MA 02169 


td 617.328.0600 


td 617.479.9000 


bx 6173283871 


hx 617.770.0443 





Fuse 14 Thm Quim»y Sm> TTwiiiday, Jwly 15, IfW 



Cahill Pre-THal 
Conference Aug. 19 



(Cont'd from page 3) 

tered in Cambridge. 

Thomas MacKay, presi- 
dent of the Building and 
Construction Trades Coun- 
cil, had brought the com- 
plaint May 19, and a special 
clerk-magistrate found there 



was sufficient evidence to 
issue a complaint. The 

charge is a misdemeanor 
which carries a penalty of 
two years in jail or a $3,000 
fine or both. 

The union also filed a 
similar complaint with the 



state Ethics Commission 
last October, but no ruling 
has yet been made. Because 
Ethics Commission matters 
are confidential, a spokes- 
man would neither confirm 
nor deny it was conducting 
an investigation. 



No Sign Of A Body 
In Granite Rail Quarry 



ixi>: rtm-t'fmMfs^a'KWM't^-mi^vmM 



Free NO 



Free checking 
With interest! 



• Tiered interest — the 

more you have on 
deposit, the higher your 

rate* 

• NO maintenance fees 
whatsoever 

• NO charges for writing 
checks or making 
deposits 



TH 



eBANKof 



• FREE first order of checks 
for new accounts 

• Monthly statement 
shows all your 
transactions 

• Overdraft protection, 
direct deposit service, 24- 
hour worldwide ATM 
access, and MasterMoney 
debit card all available 

•Amual Percertage rieW (APY) ior balances from 

Jl.OOOthrough $1,999 is 2.02%. Fof balances oJ 

$2,000 Of more, the APY is 3.04%. Compounded 

monthly APYisKCiitatcasol kne 1. 1999 

Serving t/i$ South Shore CommunitY Since 1855 1 



ifi?^ V\/ct^lMiioicii a., caivon 



Cirrus) \^[:/[ 



POUTICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



ELECT 

WILLIAM F. WEED 

CANDIDATE FOR CITY COUNCIL 
WARD 1 -- DEMOCRAT 




THE REAL 
CANDIDATE 
FOR WARD 1 

ISSUES AFFEC TTNG WARD 1: 

TRAFRC SAFETY ON SEA STREET. 
1999/2000 CITY BUDGET WILL 
BE CUT IF I AM ELECTED. 
HOW MUCH WILL THE HOSPITAL 
REALLY COST QUINCY TAXPAYERS? 

Committee to Elect William F. Weed Jasoo Kane, Chairman 



(Cont'd from page J) 

mination as we would with 
any case that we have done 
everything we could have 
done," he said. 

The second step, Keating 
said, is for him to meet with 
officials from the Metro- 
politan District Commis- 
sion, which owns the 
quarry, the MDC engineers 
and the contractor, J.F. 
White and Co., as well as 
with local and state offi- 
cials, to decide what to do 
with the quarry after he 
makes a determination that 
it is no longer part of a 



cnme scene. 

"We will still be explor- 
ing the area today and to- 
morrow," Keating said 
Tuesday. 

The area where the state 
troopers have been search- 
ing has been difficult to ac- 
cess, he said. "Ifs deeply 
recessed, like a cave, about 
30 feet 1^ 50.fect, extremely 
hard to get at," said Keating. 

"It couldn't be examined 
by TV cameras or divers, 
but that's the primary loca- 
tion, where our information 
[led us]," he said. 

The troopers spent sev- 



eral hours Tuesday search- 
ing the area. "It's physically 
difficult and dangerous," 
said Keating. The nxHrntains 
of debris could dislodge and 
topple on them, he said. "It 
hasn't been easy." 

Earlier, the troopers em- 
ployed a second German 
shepherd to search for the 

body. Keating said the dog 
sustained lacerations fro the 
debris on the floor of the 
quarry as well as bums from 
the unidentified solvents. 
Hie dog is all right now, he 
added 



Beechwood Seeks Binoculars 
For Bird Watching Program 



Beechwood on the Bay is 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



WED&THURS JULY 14 & 15 

Sean Conrwry - CatfMrJw Z Jonw 

'ENTRAPMENT (PQ-13) 

MunJhrmr 

EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 16 

Ctar • Mwto SMVi - Jbif Oineft 
TEA WITH MUSSOUNriPG) 

Comedy Drama 
FRI & SAT 7:00 49:15 

SUN - THURS 7:00 ONLY 



AU SifiTS 350 



seeking help from the com- 
munity for Project WOW, 
Watching On Wings. 

"Project WOW is a spe- 
cial part of the children's 
summer studies" for the 
youngsters attending Sum- 
mer Kamps at Beechwood 
on the Bay, said Diana Sta- 
cey, director of children's 
services. 

"The children are fasci- 



SaveGosand Money 
Shop Locally 



nated by the osprey and 
other birds native to our 
area," said Stacey. "They're 
eager to learn more — thus 
the need for binoculars and 
magnifying glasses.** 

With the binoculars and 
magnifying glasses, the 
children can observe birds 
that fly over the marsh, bay 
and ^ore, she said. 

Donations can be 
dropped off at Beechwood 
on the Bay, 440 East 
Squantum St., North 
Quincy. For other dn^ sites 
or for a pickup, call 471- 
5712. 



POLmCAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



JIM STAMOS 

CANDIDATE FOR 

WARD 6 COUNCILLOR 




FUNDRAISER 

"A Cookout On The River" 

The Adams Inn 
29 Hancock Street, North Quincy 

l\iesday, July 27, 1999 

6:00p.m. - 9:00p.m. 

Donation $20.00 per person 
Cash Bar Casual Attire Music 

Paid for by the Committee to Elect ;im Stamos Ward 6 Councillor ' 617-472-4350 



Tbunday, Jdy 15, 1999 Tikm Qulnojr 



Par 15 



P 



* 

Three Days Of Good Buys, Music And Entertainment 

Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival Underway 



It's fiin time again in 
downtown Quincy. • 

The 29tb annual Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival, a 
summer tradition with the 
accent on good buys, music 
and entertainment, opens 
today (Thursday) for a 
three-day nm through Sat- 
urday. 

The event, sponsored by 
the Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Associa- 
tion, will be held on Han- 
cock St. which will be 
closed off to vehicular traf- 
fic between Granite and 
School Sts. 

Shoppers will be able to 
^oll down the middle of 
Hancock St. dotted with 85 
canopied booths and turned 
into a pedestrian mall, lei- 
surely looking over mer- 
chandise in front of stores 
and at vendor and crafters' 
booths. 

"It will be our best Side- 
walk Festival ever," says 
QCBFA Executive Director 
Maralin Manning. "It will 
be Jie most diversified from 
both an entertainment and 
shopping standpoint. It's 
going to be a lot of fiin." 

Entertainment and odier 
activities are scheduled for 
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. today and 
Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. Saturday. 

A stage has been set up 
on Hancock St. across from 
Cottage Ave. 

If you like music, 

downtown is the place to be 
these three days with a vari- 
ety ranging form classic 
rock, to country western. 
Blues and Dixieland jazz. 

Featured are: 

Hats Off in a luncheon 




SIMON RTTT and Kdly Kaapp of *The Darttnss** country 
western group wiU perform at the Sidewalk Fcstital 
Thund^ at 6 pjn. 



Blues concert Thursday and 
Friday, nocm to 2 p.m. 

The Darlings, a national 
award winning country 
western group who will per- 
form Thursday from 6 to 8 
p.m. 

Made In The Shade 
Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. with 
a Dixieland jazz concert 
New Orleans style. This 
group has been featured at 
Quincy 's First Night cele- 
brations. 

American Beaaty in 
'60's Classic Rock concert 
from noon to 2 p.m. 
Also featured are: 
Storyteller Debbie Gizzi, 
Thursday and Friday, from 
11 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. and 
Jeanette Conroy, Saturday 
firom 11 a.m. to 12 noon. 



Tae Kwon Do demon- 
stration team Saturday, 2 to 
2:30 p.m. 

The School of American 
Dance Ensemble of Quincy 
with a medley of dance spe- 
cialties Saturday from 2:30 
to 4:30 p.m. llie group is 
directed by Gale Tilley. 

A special attraction for 
racing car enthusiasts will 
be the Hurst Motor remote 
control racing track and car 
exhibition. 

There will also be a dog 
drug sniffing deriionstration 
sponsored by the Norfolk 
County sheriff's office, 
Quincy Police Crime Pre- 
vention booth, children's 
rides, pony rides and 
clowns. 




*pbfsiini6> 



ITALIAN EATERY 



^ -COUPON >, ^ COUPON >, 



1/2 Off 

Buy Any Dinner Entree, 



J 
I 

Get Second Dinner Entree 1/2 Of f 

I Dine in only. Higher pfke dinner entree prevails. 
I WHh coupon. Not to be combined with 



I I 
I i 



$900 Q£f 



. otfier coupons or qxdals. Expires 9/30/99 . 



I Any Food Purchase over $10 1 

I I 

' Dine in or take-ontcmly. Not valid cm delivery. ' 
I Wd) coupon. Not to be condnned with | 

t ottier coupons or q)eciak. Expires 9/30/99 , 



1506 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY CENTER • 617-786-9179 
For your convenience - plenty of parking in rear 






jpii 



L«5te»s^;ia.- 






SUMMERDAZE 

at , ,/jr 



lUgistratieii is opml 

I PRESCHOOt '99-2000 

Ages 2.9 - 5 

9:00 ajit- 12:00 

M/W/F A Tin>i "*" 

CHSCKUSOUT Si 
oppointmHtt neetsaory 



Ages 3-6 

Jvkf 6 through Augitft 26 

9.00 a.m. to 12.00 

Any coini>ination of 

TUupArs o« TtmnPAyi 



SUMMER DANCE 
iCyMNXSTICS 

Once a week for 6 MC«ks at 

our Spteial Summer fiatt/ 

Jirfy 12 thru Aug 16 

Oonoc: ogos 3 A up 

fiynHMStks: oges 2 A t^ 



FAMILY IUTE5I 



221 PARKINGWAY QUINCY 

(617) 471-3808 Men - teti 9:p0 - 4t00 







SHOPPERS STROLL DOWN Hancock Street during last year's Quincy Center Side- 
walk Festival sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and Professional Association. 




%OFF 






50% OFF Selected Items 

During Quincy's Sidewalk Festival 

Thursday, Jidy 15 - Saturday, July 17 

ir^U^ ABIGAIL'S CROSSING 

%y^fy^^^ ^^ft^ ^ Collectibles 

^ 1350 Hancock St, Quincy MA • 617-472-5667 

Visit our Wd/site often at: wwwAbigailsCrossingGifts.com 




%iliWitFin.rxri?»v4Wi.«4?, 



Closeouton 
Burlington House 

Valances *5.00 

Vdues to $29.99 

Only one of many Sidewalk Sale Speciak 

RYDER-'S 
CURTAINS 

1489 Hancock St., Quincy • 773-1888 
9-5:30 daily, Thurs til 8pin • Free Two Hour Parking 

"The home fashions you want, at prices you 'II love. " 




-P^ 



puktimt/ . . . 



\gllifi OUR 5TH AHMUAI, 

^ ' CHRISTMAS 






Q 

/AVIMGI* 

ON I VCRyTHINGf 



lAy-A-WAr 
FOR X-MAI* 

g^ f 1402HA 



FIMI LAy-A-1«4y 



JEWELRY 



BANKBOSTON BLDG. 
1402 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 021G9 

617-773-3636 

www.rog«^|awe>ry.oofn 



nan 



mmmm 



lllll^ggilg^__~^^lllllll 



Ufa 



IBHl 



J 



Page U Tli« Qniitoy Sun Thiinday, July 15, 1999 



Hancock St. Closed 
For Sidewalk Festival 



Hancock St. from Gran- 
ite to School Sts. will be 
closed to vehicular traffic 
for the three-day Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival. 

That section of Hancock 
St. was scheduled to be 
closed from midnight 
Wednesday (last night) 
through 8 p.m. Saturday. 

The area will be desig- 



nated a "no parking tow 
zone" during the three days. 

However, during the 
three-day period, time will 
be allowed for vendors and 
crafters to enter the blocked 
off area to set up booths and 
other equipment and to dis- 
mantle them. 

The sidewalk Festival, 
the 29th sponsored by the 



Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association 
opens today (Thursday) and 
will continue Friday and 
Saturday. 

Entertainment and other 
activities will be from 10 
a.m. to 9 p.m. today and 
Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. Saturday. 




Selei5ted Hems 
Throughout the Store 



Phase II Jewelry & Gifts 

1361 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

617-472-6618 



.^*^ 



RUDOLPH AllWtO SAl.OSS 

Si(lc>\.ilk Sale Specials 



Thursday, July 15th 

Complimentary Makeup Application 

from 1 Gam til 7pm 

Complimentary Lip or Eyebrow Wax 

with any cut & blow diy. 

Sign up to win a FREE FACIAL in our raffle 

Ridolph Adano 

151S HANCOCK ST. |Vll4 7 STAGECwlcH WAY 

QUINa, MA 02169 .# iW COHASSET, MA 02025 

(617)984-1500 I I ■ I* (781)383-1550 



-C;-' 






OUNKIN' 
DONUTS* 

1462 Hancock Street Quincy Center 

SIDEWALK SPECIAL! 

July 15, 16, 17 




II 



with the purchase of 
any size beverage! 

Offer valid with coupon. 1 coupon per customer, cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. 




DIXIELAND JAZZ BAND *'Madc in the Shade** is one of the musical headliners appearing 
at tliis year's Quincy Center Sidewalli FcstivaL The group, sponsored by the South Shore 
Savings Banic, win perform FrMay, from 6 to 8 p.m. on state at Hancocic St. and Cottage Ave. 

The Festival Committee 



A committee of Quincy 
Center Business and Profes- 
sional Association and sta^ 
planned this 29th annual 
Sidewalk Festival. 

QCBPA President 
Deanna Gazarian of Phase II 



Jewelry chaired the com- 
mittee which included: 

Stephen Blumberg of 
Stephen Leigh Jewelries, 
Henry Bosworth, The 
Quincy Sun; Joanne Falco, 
Professional Cuts, Etc.; 



QCBP A executive Director 
Maralin Manning, Bill Mor- 
rill, Creative Fairs; Caryn 

Smith, Caryn 's Comer and 
Marie Watts, QCBPA office 
secretary. 



QuincyHospital 



fj 



Quincy Visiting Nurse Association will provide 

^ree blood pressure screenings 

at the 
1999 Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 






v*-> 




VISIT OUR TENT 

for information about Quincy Hospital, 

Quincy Visiting Nurse Association services, 

WIC nutrition program services and 

free blood pressure checks! 





INDOOR SIDEWALK SALE! 

20% - 70% OFF Selected Styles 

Thursday. July 15 thru Saturday. July 17 



H.A.rsl LCD iSI ■ S 



FAMflYSHOh STORF ■ MFN - WOM^N ■ CJHH DRI N 
. 2/B COTTAGE AVE , QUINCY • 4 72 4V26 



Smt/f/ALf< SAU 



QCBPA 

Try your luck for the real thing 



IM THK /TOM 

OH ifAU? 



INSTANT CJkSHm 

Po» TOW IMMMMads^GoM, 
ftolev WafaJMs « Chelsea Clocks 



1415 HANCOCK STRKI:T, Ql IN( A • 6I7-471-4S24 



• 








Tkanday, July 15, 1999 Tli*QullMiy 


■ 


^^R^^^^S^^Kb^^^^^^^F^^^f^^^F^^K^ 


«>*»*:«<• 


i- '■ ■^;? !i 


S^ 4 ^4^ » » * # 1$ W & ». >« «* 


^t^iS'****®^^*®®^^*^**! 



99th Annual 
auincy Center 






Sidewalk M\n\ 



FUN! 



• • I 



ENTERTAINMENT! 
UVE MUSIC! 



SHOPPING! 
GAMES! 



^ * > < < 



JN w^^v*^ wAs»»^-.ow«V»t«*W« •» <»C<mX WOWy<A XOfr a)v }>AX04.\^« 






^4^ 



.\ » > < . « 



••v\'.\ < • 



THURSDAY, JULY 15 



^^\'^ ** 






fc«-* 






- ^y * ^'^ ^JO'**-'^ V S^^ 



C \ X J* >^^ ^^'^ i^-i ¥ <*■ «s 






j. J ^ ^w *<? *™ 






X-^.-i'-- 



*5t*-( 



, -^ <-•* N -X-^tv.^ 






3».\1 



:.*f 



\ •} 






is'^^^^T;! 



\.«/t\ 



^■fiiM & •> 



8^.^ 



"^-■ii^yA >^- 






I?**'? 






rf^s<5e-^^*vv^-^ 






f^jj^-i 



■iit '^ 









:.*>■*■*.: 






e 



. J> 



»*^i>?s;[j 



f N ^ AAA '^ ^^ -dSW^^SW* ♦ < '• 






•«■(<■ '^^■ 



k\S(J * ^ * 



^ X » * -J^ ^ -t ^ 



P'^$' > 






I Vl'>A*'-%«OiX««*.»^^» A*'*5'i 



> t >N 



FRIDAY, JULY 16 












4 ! 



i^^ 






<•?*.<« 



i,^->A 






.*<*•+.« 






mmmwimm 






(^V *\ ■*■ 



i > **'*'i*'*?.5tS-'^« 



>>* «^-<r«■^' 



t* 4 *-*x*- *»>x*sx«i s >^ " sf > r ' ' 



'^ ;<^A'^ 






,S :a\- 






_Jt^•■■<l 






>•.>* »■*. ■ 



o;iD»i*t**5>' 



'^i'. ■«.«■. ».i^-} 



^'^,'1 









k-.<: 



.. - >> 



t\^^^^-Cs x< 1^ 



o-- >•• Is " <x.~ * i 



■.it 



'^«.<ft* 



'3.-^ 3 tr^ 



!•%>** 












^^ ^*^Sii-li(-^- 



•J- ,Xs' 



♦ y j'S »■'* 






js #■ ^ ^ s ^ ^ -X 



* 4- 



mSK53 



s. <■.#<■ V ■frfr^.V' 



^ A-^s ^Xk X' if 






^:|'0«^ i»^jl 



SATURDAY, JULY 17 






Sua Page 17 



■--* ■-^- ^^ xfii-ii-^i 

'a * 



"^V' 



H^ ^> 111 ^HWOB 

, . < . . . ' > * < ' 



r,$iOitrTiiuiii 



«t^&c^-* '^:^'^--xx-: 









,*^<%'?S'X.- 



X^* 



i. t 



2:00 PM - 2:30 Hi 



JlMEfliCSMr tfilimr . 60's Classic iMk 

Sponsored by Sherman Realty 
Spon$Qf6?djb^jbl6m Institute, Tae Kwon Do, Quincy 

School of AmoriciPiR Bonco iMsmble, QoiiMy, MA 

Continuing Events Of Special Interest And Fun 

Crofter And Vendor Booths,,Gfciikiran's Rides, Pony Rides, Remote Control Track & Racing 
Car Exposition, Norfolk County Dog^pgi^nstration/Crime Prevention Booth 



^^flftr4s3tWI 



* # # # ^ t 



Page 18 TlM Qulaoar Sua Thunday, July 15, 1999 



All Type$ ojLetUhpi^epair 

I •ff^ & Heel expires 8/3 1/99 ^f^ « Heel 

V MEN'S & WOMEN'S 

I lai llam«oi*li Stre^U (|uln«-.> • «I7-7»4MNKI2 



Y 



Urban Anna 



( .()\isi(AMi M ( loihii k' 



DESlqiNER & VlNTAQE CloilHiNq & ACCESSORIES 



Sidewalk .Sale 
I p To 50% OffR 




C^Eck Us Out! 
7 CoTTAQE Ave., QuiNcy Center • 6]7-471-2?80 



PLAYMOBIL 



GEOSAFARI 



MADAME ALEXANDER DOLLS 



O • 0« 



Ut i^our irn«£frMfion come out to )>lay! 

1153 HANCOCK rTMCT, QUINCy • 617-47^9500 

(in front of Quincy Center T station) 

aO% OFF 

pkiiimeWI MX mohth 

CUARAMCl MUl 

» 

/mcT iTiMi* 50% OFF! 



GAMES 



COROLLE 



LEGO 



DOLLS 



ROKENBOK 



Joe Palumbo's 




hta 



hancock tire & appliance 

115 Franklin Street, South Quincy 

472-1710 



Sales • Service • Parts 

^ 35 UM 

FREE DELIVERY 



(Next to Adams Birthplaces) 



GECAP 



Open 'Dies. & Thurs. 

Nights *tll 9piii 

FREE PARKING 



Appliances far (n^erSOy ears 



3 DAYS ONLY - THURS., FBI. & SAT. 

100'§ of Furniture Pieces on Display 

qOFF 

AND MORE! 

Don't Miss This 
Sidewalk Display! 

• SOFAS • CHAIRS 

• DINING SETS 
• LEATHER • RUGS 

• MATTRESSES 




RECLINERS 
FROM 



$ 



299 



00 



FiRMTi RE Market 



169 Parkingway * Quiney 

(Fenaerl}' Paperama) 
(Rte. 3, Exit 19) 

617-773-1953 

ALw k>catc<l at Craibcrry Cnwsiir? ii Kiigsti 



SHOPPERS AGAIN will find good buys at the three day Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. 



PIZZA • SUBS • CALZONES - ITALIAN SPECIALTIES & MORE! 



o^g{apoCi Cafe 

ofQuincif Center 

#i on tfie SoutH Sfume 

FdrFostServico,CailllsAt 471-9090 
Fax 471 -9097 1570 Nancodi Sffraet, Quinqr 




PIZZA • SUBS • CALZONES • ITALIAN SPECIALTIES & MORE! 




35 Cottage Avenue, Quincy, MA 02169 

617-745-0202 Fax: 617-745-0201 

Open 7 days a week from Ham 



SnOOF/rx ^ 

SIDEWALK SALE EVEWTI 

Three Days - Thurs., July 15 thru Sat., July 17 

2 Tents - Huge Savings on Chlfdrens Shoes & Morel 

' Stoj) by our 2 Big Tents In Quincy Center at 1420 Hancock St. ' 

or visit our store on 695 Adams Street, Quincy • 617-773-2929 



CURRY AKX. 
HARDWARE 




370 C o p tii d Sifott 

WmI Qvincy 

472-1250 



190(MMyA 
•43-1414 



UMTT ONE KEY PER PERSON OR CXHJPON "NEIGHBORS' SERVD^ NEIGHBORS" 



I 
I 
i 
i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



■^^ 



Thursday, July 15, 1999 TImi Quiatoy Sun Page 19 



Citizens Bank Branch 

At North Quincy Shaw's 

Will Close Saturday 



The Citizens Bank 
branch inside Shaw's Su- 
permarket in North Quincy 
will close Saturday when 
Shaw's closes in preparation 
for the takeover by Victory 
Super Market. 

"We're closing for safety 
reasons," said Kris Danna, a 
Citizens public information 
officer. 

She said there are four 
Citizens Bank branches af- 
fected by the acquisition of 
the Star Market chain bv 



Shaw's. In addition to its 
North Quincy branch, its 
branch inside the Star Mar- 
ket in Norwell also is af- 
fected. 

"Because of our presence 
in Quincy," Danna contin- 
ued, "it's so heavy, we have 
a lot of options." 

In addition to the stand- 
alone branch at 371 Han- 
cock St., there are other 
branches in Quincy Point on 
Washington Street, in South 
Quincy on Franklin Street 



94- Year-Old Volunteer, 
49 Others Honored 
At Allerton House 



Allerton House at Han- 
cock Park in Quincy re- 
cently hosted a buffet 
luncheon for their 50 vol- 
unteers ranging in age from 
15 to 94 years. 

Ester Gizzarelli, 94, of 
WoUaston, was honored as 
the eldest volunteer. For the 
last three years, she has con- 
sistently volunteered her 
time throughout the year by 
engaging the residents of 
Allerton House in crafting 
holiday favors. She also 
volunteers her time to the 
Quincy Visiting Nurse As- 
sociation. 

"Ester is an asset to our 
group of volunteers," said 



Sarah Anne Frazier, Direc- 
tor of Resident Services. 
"The fact that her age has no 
barrier on her active life- 
style is motivating to the 
other volunteers, but most 
importantly to the residents 
who really enjoy her and 
look forward to her visits." 

Allerton House at Han- 
cock Park is an 42-assisted 
living residence owned and 
managed by Norwell-based 
Welch Healthcare and Re- 
tirement Group, who this 
year celebrates 50 years of 
being the most trusted name 
in senior and rehabilitative 
healthcare services on the 
South Shore. 



Meredith Langille 
Commended Student 



Adin 



Meredith Langille, a of Mr. ani Mrs. 

sophomore at Tabor Acad- Langille of Quincy. 

emy, Marion, has been ^i^— — ^^— — , 
named to the Commended 

Student List for the second Save Gos and Money 

XI yL"' "" '""■'' Shop Locally 

Meredith is the daughter 




hy Laura Andrus and Joan F. Wright 

DvtelortfMaiittutg DvtelOrofCtmmiuulfKikH$ia 

FOOD GUIDE FOR THE ELDERLY 

Many of the aihnents that mid stand spare amounts of 
afflict the elderly are fats, oils and sweets. 
(in)directly caused by poor While it is very difficult 
food choices. Thus, the De- to do, it's important to dis- 
partment of Agriculture's cuss what your wishes are 
Human Nutrition Research with your adult children. 
Center on Aging at Tufts Unless you have made your 
University has devised a requests known, those deci- 
food guide pyramid for sions may be made for you 
Americans over 70. At its if and when such a need 
foundation are eight 8-ounce arises. At Mariiui Place, a 
daily servings of water, with- senior living resklence, we 
out which blood pressure offereverything firom social 
may fall dangerously low, and cultural programs to the 
kidney function may be com- personal care assistance you 
promised, and constipation require. For grack>us living 
may become chronic. The in a acenic seaskie setting, 
next level contains six or visit us at Four Seaport 
more daily servings of (ffl>er- Drive. Phone: 617-770- 
rich) grain-based foods. 3264. 
"Then come (fiber-rich) P.S. The scientists who 
fruits and vegetables, fol- developed die food pyramid 
lowed by three servings of for diose over age 70 alw 
low-fat dairy products and recommend that die elderly 
two or more servings of take calcium,iitamiHD, and 
meat, poultry, fish, b^ans or B-12 in siqtpianait form to 
nirts. At the tc^ of the pyra- fidfUldieirmtOidonal needs. 



and an in-store branch at the 
Star Market 130 Granite St, 
plus the regional headquar- 
ters at 1200 Hancock St. 

If someone is used to do 
Sunday banking, he/she 
could go to the branch at 
Star Market on Sunday, said 
Danna. 

Danna said Citizens 
wants to maintain its pres- 
ence at the new Victory Su- 
per Market when it reopens. 
However, she said she did 
not know when that woiild 
occur. 

Victory Supermarket 
president Arthur "Jay" 



DiGeronimo Jr. said previ- 
ously Shaw's would close 
July 17, and Victory would 
take possession of the store 
July 24. 

On July 26, Victory per- 
sonnel will accept applica- 
tions for employment and 
schedule interviews for pro- 
spective staff. 

■ DiGeronimo said the 
store would be closed for an 
undetermined amount of 
time while the store under- 
goes $1.5 million worth of 
renovations, placing "a per- 
sonal touch" to the three- 
year-old store. 




COMMUNITY LEADER Tom Galvin (left) receives a 
House of Representatives commendatioii from Rep. Bruce 
Ayers for -his long service with Boston Gear and the Quincy 
business community. Galvin retired after 43 years with 
Boston Gear, 20 as vke president. The company honored 
him at a farewell reception at Kevin's at the Heritage. 

(Quincy Sun PhotolRobert Noble) 



Quincy High School Senior Night Out 99 

Wishes To Thank All Those Who 
Contributed To Making This Night Special 




To the Class of 1999 



♦ ♦♦. 




''Harvard Pilgrim Health Care" "Roche Bros'' 
''D-A.RE." ''Quincy PAL'' "Quincy Police" 

"Stop n Shop" 



Newcomb Farms 
St Joseph's 
Global Destinations 
Meineke Disc. Muffler 
So. Shore Buick 
Granite City Self Storage 
Stephen Leigh Jeweler's 
Belle Visage Beauty Spa 
O'Lindy's 
Coffee Break Caf^ 
Michael Morrissey 
Abigail's Crossing 
Rhyme n Reason 
Monadnock Water 
Copeland Package Store 
The Quincy Sun 
Kathleen Butler 
QMS Basketball Alumni 
Bob's Speed & Auto 
Hairplace One 
Lincoln-Hancock PTO 
Allan Yacubian DMD PC 
QHS Alumni / Friends 
Quincy Emergency Mgmt 
Dependable Cleaners 
Rich Galooze/ Revolutions 
Four Star Paper 



Owen O'Leary's 

Granite Rail 

Domino's Pizza 

Montilio's Bakery 

Barry' Deli 

So. Shore YMCA 

QHS Store 

Frantic Framers 

Peace of Mind 

Dan Raymondi 

Citizen's Bank 

Linda Stice 

QHS Hockey 

Sterling PTO 

George Burke 

QHS PAC 

Catherine Smith 

JCM Computers 

Papa Gino's 

Imperial Terrace 

Broad Meadows PTO 

Mayor James Sheets 

Stephen Tobin 

St. Mary' Rectory 

Pat Del Val 

Marilyn Waywood 

East Coast Marital Arts 

Consumer Home Mortgage 



The FourN 
Phase n Jewelry 
Fairy Nails 
Petar's Auto 
Shaw's 
Egg&l 
OSCO 
Star Market 
Michael D'Amico 
Tim Cahill 
Roseann Flavin 
Paul Harold 
A. & M. Foley , 
Coca Cola 
Regina Russell's 
Harry's Pizza 
Rainbow Roofing 
Steve Durkin 
Peter O'Connell 
Ron Mariano 
ERA Central 
Central PTO 
Chief Frane 
St. John's 
Joann Bragg 
QHS Soccer 



THANKS TO THE SENIOR NIGHT OUT 99 COMMITTEE, 
TEACHERS, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS WHO CHAPERONED. 

Spedal thanks to the Class of 1999 for making their Senior Night Out a 
night to rememl>er. 



tttmmmm 



PagcM TlitfQuinoy 



ThwMlay.jHiylS, 1999 




jpiw^£to^4ii.6J^ 



Fitness For The Frazzled 

Calcium Key For Strong Bones, Workout Program 



New England plays host 
to several premium sporting 
events this summer. Profes- 
sional baseball, golf, soccer, 
and tennis will draw thou- 
sands to competitions be- 
tween the best of the best. 

Whether watching all- 
stars fielding on the dia- 
mond, golfers teeing off on 
the green, soccer players 
duking it out on the field, or 
tennis players volleying on 
the court, one is sure to be 
inspired to exercise. 

To make sure your body 
can keep up with your 
workout program, eat a 
healthy diet like the pros. 
Put calcium at the top of the 
meal plan to keep your 
bones in competitive shape. 
In fact, not getting enough 
calcium can pose more of a 
health threat than Ameri- 
cans realize. According to 
the National Osteoporosis 
Foundation, osteoporosis, a 
bone-thinning disease, is a 
major health threat for 28 
million Americans, 80 per- 
cent of w^m are women. 

Professional athletes and 



weekend warriors alike 
benefit from a combination 
of exercise and good eating 
habits. But taste is also im- 
portant. New England Diary 
Promotion Board recom- 
mends athletes keep cheese 
on the training table to boost 
both calcium and flavor. 

To boost the benefits of 
physical activity, it's im- 
portant to exercise for at 
least 30 minutes on most or 
all days of the week. (You 
don't have to work out as 
much as the pros do.). Fit- 
ness experts at the American 
Heart Association, the 
American College of Sports 
Medicine and the Centers 
for Disease Control and 
Prevention say that the 30 
minutes of daily activity can 
be divided into as many as 
three, 10-minute segments. 

According to the most 
recent Surgeon General's 
Report on Physical Activity 
and Health, more than 60 
percent of adults do not 
achieve the recommended 
amount of regular physical 
activity and 25 percent of 



adults are not active at all. 

"Since we live in such a 
fast-paced society, it's 
harder to find the time to 
devote to physical activi- 
ties," says Ruth Carey, reg- 
istered dietitian and fltness 
expert. "People think of 
exercise as being too con- 
suming, but the benefits 
from 30 minutes of daily 
physical activity can make 
anyone feel better and 
healthier. It is never too late 
to begin a daily exercise 
regimen." 
The Physical Advantage 

People at any age benefit 
from physical activity. Ex- 
ercise helps you maintain a 
healthy weight, makes you 
feel better and boosts your 
immune system. According 
to a recent study conducted 
by researchers at the Cooper 
Institute of Aerobics Re- 
search, everyday activities 
such as raking leaves and 
climbing stairs can be as 
effective as a structured 
workout to improve fitness 
or heart and lungs. 

It's important to remem- 



ber that physical activity 
does not need to be strenu- 
ous in order to achieve 
health benefits. Actually, 
according to the Surgeon 
General's Report on Physi- 
cal Activity and Health, 
men and women of all ages 
benefit from a moderate 
amount of daily physical 
activity because a little is 
better than nothing at all. 
Exercise And Caldiun: 
A Strong Combination 
Eating a calcium-rich, 
all-star diet - with a spot- 
light on cheese - is the 
foundation for strong, 
healthy bones, while 
weight-bearing exercises 
helps maintain strong bones. 
"Incorporated into your 
daily meals, a single serving 
of cheese can infuse your 
diet with 20 percent of the 
recommended daily allow- 
ance for calcium," says 
Carey. "By simply adding a 
handful of shredded cheese 
to your favorite salad or 
pasta dish, you can enhance 
the flavor of the meal, boost 
calcium and help strengthen 



POWER CLUB 

Makes 1 sandwidi: 2 servings 
Prep time: 6 minotes 



3 

1 

1 

4 

1/2 

1 

1 

1/4 

1/4 



sICM of whole wheal bread, toasted 

taWespoon of lit tree roayonnatee. 

ounce (about 18 leaves) pacitaged spmacb 

tomfltoslces 

cup packaQed shredded cvrols 

taa^Kxm mtietan} > 

sice (one ounce) Cheddar cheeee 

cup sicad, frseh mushrooms 

cup altaKa ^)rouis or any siriad sprouts 




Cat off crust from toasted breail. Spread equal 
amoimts of mayonnaise on ooe side of each piece of 
biead. Cov^ 1 bread slice with about 9 spinach leaves, 
2 slices tmiu^D«i and carrots. P|ace seccmd slke oCbread 
on top (rfcsrrois and tovg wiA remsinjng s(Mmh leaves. 
Cbeddar cheese^ tomato slice^ mushrooms nod i^irouts. 
Plaoe third slice of bf^ on top c^ sprout^witlf spread 
side down. Cut sandwich diagooaUy ^ hall S^ With 
ficsh fruit III season and i gliss of sidm inilk or spar' 
klingmniend water. ,. 

JWitiwfogttPCTXrrmg:280cakM^ 
j|t ami 159l» of the DaOy \Uue for caldnm.^ 




Dana Smith, D.P.M. and 
Surgeons- 

HIGH 

Did you ever wonder what the 
effects of beei height on your shoes 
are on the rest of your body? The fol- 
lowing brief review may give you 
some answers. 

When a person stands barefoot, a 
line going from the head to the foot 
creates a 90 degree angle with the 
floor. As you increase the height ol 
the heel, the body tilts forward reduc- 
ing that angle to as low as 55 degrees 
if the height of the heel is diree inches. 
A person cannot walk this way lurch- 
ing forward. Therefore compensation 
has to occur. This means, subcon- 
sciously, adjustments will occur that 
involve the ankle, knee, hip, s{rine and 
bead. You can imagine that if these 
adjustments continue foi a long pe- 



GeorgeJ. Ducach, D.PM 
Podiatrists 

HEELS 

riod of time, strains and stresses will 
occur. Injuries will not be far behind. 

The height of the heel also 
changes where body weight falls on 
die foot itself, ball vs. heel. This al- 
teratieo afifeds the gait cyde itself and 
leads to unusual shoe wear, and, for 
example, shortening of the Achilles 
tendon and Ok calf muscles. In sum- 
mary, a zero heel height would be 
ideal and probably would reduce 
many problems. 

If you are having any foot ptdb- 
lems, call and schedule an appmnt- 
ment at 773-4300. We are located at 
1261 Furnace Brook Parkway, Suite 
#18, Quincy, and are affiliated with 
Carney, Quincy and South Shore Hos- 
pitals. 



Do You Suffer From 



Asthma . . .Allergies . . . Secondhand Smoke ...Pet 

Odors & Dander . . . DustMUes . . . Chronic Colds . . . 

Chemical Fumes . . . or other indoor air pollution? 

punnr THE air in your home or offke 

and get immediate relief from these irritations with 

LIVING AIR XL-15 

NEW FlieiESS TECHNOLOGY • NO MAINTENANCE • 3 YEAR WARRANTY 
IN-HOME DEMO & 3 DAY TRIAL WITH NO COST OR OBUGATION 

CaU Today To Bring /""'N^'^^Vv 
FreshAirBack ' "^^ 



50011 

Living Air XL-15 



Into Your Home \4 ISCLEAN 

781-335-6197 / \ AIR 



your bones all at the same 
time." 

New England Dairy 
Promotion Board recom- 
mends "teeing off lunch 
with a "Power Club" sand- 
wich (see recipe with story) 
to boost calcium intake and 
give you energy for a 
lunchtime workout. The 
double-decker sandwich has 
spinach, shredded carrots, 
mushrooms, sprouts, and 
Cheddar cheese on whole 
wheat bread. A cold fat free 
milk will benefit bones even 
more. 

To further improve bone 
health, try weight-bearing or 
strength training exercises 
like running, walking aero- 
bics and weight-lifting. 
Bones are forced to support 
weight and this makes them 
stronger. 

Weight-bearing exercises 



Children Adults 

iiT%w. A" 
Teens 1-^1 • r\ Families 

Robert Azrak, Ed.D., FA.C0.P. 

Licensed Psychologist 

Mass Bay Counseling, 1 Billings Rd., North Quincy 

(617) 786-6137 
www.inergy.coin/RAzrakPsychology 



appear to stimulate bone 
formation and strengthen 
muscles that help support 
bones. Recent published 
reports state regular weight- 
bearing exercise can boost 
bone density 3 to 5 percent a 
year. Also, daily physical 
activity improves balance, 
strength and coordination, 
which helps reduce the risk 
of falls and bone injuries. 

Furthermore, there are 
other options if you are 
looking for something com- 
pletely different. "If you are 
tired of running outside or 
on the treadmill at your lo- 
cal gym, energize your 
workout by taking an in- 
vigorating exercise class 
like kickboxing or spin- 
ning," Carey suggests. 
"They are part of the latest 
exercise 'craze,' and the 
classes will definitely add a 
new twist to a monotonous 
exercise regimen." 



Quit Smoking. 



American Heait 
AssodationJ 



« 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UFE 




NEW WEIGHT LOSS MEDICATION 

XENICAL' 



® 



Call for information or 
to schedule an appointment 



covered by some insurances 




Located in the Granite Plaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Gnuilte Street. Bnlatiee, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVm 8. EOn^MAN. MP. MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



4e£ yi?i/ Ar Rissc 
fOR iMMe OfseAse? 

LYMErix™ 

Lyme Disease Vaccine 

Now Available at 



Covered by most insurances 




Located In the Granite Plaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Onnite 8tfeet. Bnlstiee, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVm S. EGILMAN. MD, MPH. MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



.M- ^. 



Thiinda]r,Ja|ylS,lfM TIm Qiaiauigr Sua Par 21 



Spci^ts 




BRIAN PITT moves ahead in hustler race daring the Upton 
^"^ '^' (Quincy Sun Photos/Tom Gorman) 



STEVE STREIT guides his laser to finish Ifaic hi the Upton ^^^j^y TAKACS of Quhicy and his crew worii to control 
Cup '99- theh- catamaran hi Upton Cup *99. 



More Than 1,000 Sailors Compete 

Local Skippers Fare 
Well In Lipton Cup 



More than 1,000 sailors 
raced in the 13th Annual 
Lipton Cup Regatta at 
Squantum Yacht Club last 
weekend, and there were 
some Quincy natives who 
were able to etch their 
names on the trophy. 

Joe Valante and Robert 
Bergstedt, sailing their Ho- 
bie 21, won the mulithull 
race, which served as the 
qualifier for the USSA Area 
A National Champioships 
later this summer. 

Dave Fortier and 
Gretchen Hardy of Maine, 
who sailed Prindle 18, came 
in second with Connecti- 



cut's Marc and Jody Marz- 
ialo following in the third 
spot. 

Bonnie Marcel of Wol- 
laston was neck-to-neck in 
the Hustler Division before 
taking home the crown. 

In the PHRF class, 
Quincy 's Ralph DiMattia 
won the A Fleet Division. 
Hingham's Bill Collins fin- 
ished first in the D Fleet and 
Hull's Bill McLeam won 
the E Fleet. 

Quincy 's Peter Dolbec 
won the Optimist White 
race while Robbie Dolbec 
finished second in the Op- 
timist Blue Class, won by 



Ben Proctor of Scituate. 

Wollaston's Meaghan 
and Patrick Morrissey came 
in third in Optimist Blue 
and third in Optimist Whit«, 
respectively. 

Hingham's Finely Mer- 
rill cruised to a win in the 
Optimist Green Fleet, fol- 
lowed by Teddy Mellors 
and Stephen Morris, also of 
Hingham. 

Thirty-five Optimists 
competed in four age 
classes, ranging from the 
age of 10 to 80. And it was 
veteran yacht racer Lee Van 
Gemert, 80, who restored an 
Indian to win that class. 




DAN CLARK maneuvers his bser craft during the Upton Cup *99. 



Chrisom Named 
North Football Coach 



Peter Chrisom, Jr. has 
been named the new head 
football coach for the North 
Quincy High School Red 
Raiders. 

Chrisom is the son of 
Peter Chrisom, who retired 
last year as North Quincy 's 
principal. 

Chrisom replaces Ken- 
neth McPhee, who stepped 
down earlier this year after 
18 years at the helm to be- 
come the Social Health Co- 
ordinator for Quincy Public 
Schools. 

"It's quite a feeling," 
said Chrisom, who served as 
an assistant under McPhee 
since 1986. **l have some 
big shoes to follow, but I'm 
excited and looking forward 
to it 

"I was there a long time. 
I felt I needed a change and 
when this cqp^rtunity came 
abcNit I went after it." 



Chrisom, 44, began his 
coaching career at North 
Quincy in 1984 as the as- 
sistant coach of girls indoor 
and outdoor track. Before 
North Quincy, Chrisom was 
the assistant football coach 
at Quincy ('85), Westwood 
('84) and Sharon ('83). 

Chrisom plans on keep- 
ing North Quincy 's rich 
tradition alive. 

Tfn going to keep it in 
line the best I can," said 
Chrisom. "I've been here a 
while so I have an idea of 
what is expected." 

Chrisom will also leave 
his physical education 
teaching job to take 
McPhee 's former position 



$av« Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



as Dean of Students. And he 
is still undecided about re- 
turning as the head coach of 
the boys indoor and outdoor 
track team. 

As for this season, 
Chrisom expects to field a 
competitive team. 

"We're a very young 
team," said Chrisom. "I'm 
looking forward to this year. 
We have some veteran start- 
ers coming back." 




QUINCY'S JOE VALENTI adjusts spfamalwr hi Thunderirfrd nKc. 

(Quincy Sun PhotoslTom Gorman) 



ALL STAR BASEBALL CAMP 

INSTRUaiON & HITTING CAMPS 

Ag«f 6, 7, 8 Form Lnogua 
Ages 9-12 UtHnLMigua 

Ag«13 Bob* Ruth 

W««k 1: July 12-16 

WMk2: July 19-23 

LocatkMi: Eoslini NoniMM Coll«9« 

losaboH ComplM - Quhicy 

S BoWiii Cogtf • 2 ImbaR BaMs 

FOR INFORMATION, 001 PAUL BESTON 471 -1>44 



(\wHn 



ROUND BALL BASKETBALL CAMP 

FOR BOYS & GIRLS 

August 2-6 Ages 8-11 

August 9-13 Ages 12-16 

Location: Norfti GMncy High 

Guest lecturer^ Doiy I n sif u cHon ond Gcwnes 

Col For BrodHjrel 
Ted Stevenson 328-3409 or 471-1846 



PBfe22 ThmQuba/ay 



TlMnidqr,J«lyl5,1999 



Proceeds Benefit Quincy Elder Services Transportation 

18th Annual Broom Classic 'The Best Ever' 



The 18th Annual Broom 
Classic was recently held at 
Presidents Golf Course with 
the team of Walter Hannon, 
III, Ken Furfari, A! Freeman 
and Ged Dahlquist taking 
home the crown. 

All proceeds from the 
tournament went to the 
Quincy Elder Services 
Transportation program 
which provides rides to 
senior citizens for medical 
appointments. 

"It was very successful," 
said Brian Buckley, director 
of the Quincy Elder Serv- 
ices. "It was the best we've 
had so far." 

The proceeds raised are 
dedicated in the name of 
someone within the Broom 
Circle, and this year David 
C. Comis, who past away 
within the last year, re- 
ceived the honor. 

Eighty players partici- 
pated in this year's event, 
which began with the cos- 
tume parade festivities. 

In the parade the golfers 
arrived at the first tee 
dressed with a theme of 
College Logo's and Leg- 
ends. Al Bortolotti won the 
costume contest dressed as a 
Notre Dame cheerleader. 

The Hannon team fin- 
ished with a 12 under score 
of 58 to capture the champi- 
onship. Furfari's wedge to 
six inches of the cup on the 
ninth hole sparked his crew, 
and they never looked back. 

Ed Miller, John Capo- 
rale, Bob Swirlbalus and 
Don Conboy finished three 






BRIAN BUCiaEY (left), dressed as legendary Notre Dame 
football coach Knut Rockoe, greets Norfolk County Sheriff 
Michael BeUotti at the 18th annual Broom Oassk. 



PAUL RADZIK (left) and Walter Hannon, III, were 
costumed as Cadets of Norwich University in Vermont. 
Hannon's team won the recent Broom Classic held at 
Presidents Golf Course. Joining the '^cadets" is Hannon's 
son, Walter IV. 



strokes behind with a score 
of 61. 

Bortolotti, Ged Phelan, 
Bill McBirney and Erik 
DeBoer came in third with a 



PRESIDENTS' LADIES 
GOLF ASSOCIATION 



MEMBER GUEST -JULY 10 
GROSS 

1 . 63 - Melanie Curtin/Beta Bassett 

2. 68 - Barbara Quinn/Robin Hayes 

3. 69 - Sue Coleman/Carol Rennie 
NET 

54 - Liz Harrington/Camilla Fraser 
54 - Patty Buck/Nancy Murphy 
56 - Marion Tholander/Mary Means 
56 - Lynn Guerra/Marilyn Stone 
58 - Nancy Sorgi/Eileen Sorgi 
58 • Judy Abbruzzese/Laurie DeVitt 

60 - Karen Ryan/Barbara Lawrence 

61 - Gigi Szekeley/Christi Hollidge 
61 - Sue Martinelli/Chris Lynch 
61 - Rita Minton/Kathy Wakefield 
61 - Pat Walsh/Patti Sykes 

61 - Judy Schneider/Linda Hartz 

62 - Rot>erta McCann/Carol Rappoli 
62 • Moya Baldwin/Pat King 
62 - Lynn McGoff/Katie Vina! 
62 - Gigi Wallace/Joan Coyne 



score of 62, as did the teams 
of Ed Boylan, Bruce Buck- 
ley, Paul Radzik, Jim Kel- 
ley, and Ken McPhee, Jay 
Sarson, Jamie Walsh, Roger 

Conboy. 

The next four teams (6-9) 



totaled a 63. The teams were 
Joe Trocki, Jack Raymer, 
Gus DeBoer, and Fred Mur- 
ray; Phil Carlino, Bill 
Rendle, Jim Rougvie, and 
Don Comis; Jake Doyle, 
Bob Doyle, Tim Flynn, and 
Ken Mann; Mitch McBride, 
Dave Robinson, Doug 
MacFarlane, and Mike 
Draicchio. 

George McCall, Dave 
Haight, Jamie Doyle, Paul 
Preziosi and Barry Sullivan, 
Paul Cadigan, Chip Ennis, 
Bob Sullivan finished 10th 
and 11th, respectively, with 
a score of 64. 



The team of Paul 
Donoghue, Charlie Ber- 
geron, Bill Bilton and Bob 
Wall followed with a 65 to 
take the 12th spot. 

The 13th through 17th 
place squads all stroked a 
66. Bob Kilday, Lou Pici- 
utto, John Kearney, and 
Paul Messina; Buckley, 
Fred Gennelly, Paul Bren- 
nan, and Alex Coutts; Tom 
Henderson, Jim Rendle, 
George Peachey, and Bob 
Olsen; Bill Gould, Tom 
Downey, Bill O'Connell, 
and Dave Comis; Mike 
Donoghue, Mike Bellotti, 



AL BORTOLOTTI, dressed 
as a Notre Dame 
cheerleader, was the winner 
of the Broom Classic 
CcMtume Contest 
Paul Carey, and Pudge Gill 
made up the teams that took 
the five spots. 

The groups of Don 
Smith, John Franceschini, 
John MacFarlane, Paul 
Pomes, and Paul Nestor, 
Mike Conlon, John McKay, 
Greg Pomes shot a 67. 

Dave DiCarlo, Peter 
McGillicuddy, Rick Radzik 
and C.J. Bell rounded out 
the tournament with a 69. 

In the closest to the pin 
contests, Bellotti, Caporale, 
Dahlquist, Doug 

MacFarlane, Walsh and 
Nestor were the individual 
winners. Jack Doyle won 
the longest putt made com- 
petition and Jamie Doyle 
won the longest drive event. 



St. John's Golf Outing Set For July 26 



St. John's seventh 
annual golf outing will be 
held Monday, July 26 at 
the President's Golf Course 
in North Quincy. 

Entries are still being 
accepted. 

There will be a shotgun 
start at 8 a.m. with Florida- 



style mixed teams. 

The entry fee of $75 per 
person includes green fees, 
a golf cart, tee package, 
"Freddie's Famous Dinner" 
at St. John's parish hall 
and prizes for all 
participants. 



Applications and 
checks made payable to 
St. John's Golf Outing 
should be sent to Bill and 
Jean Donnelly, 33 
Charlesmount Ave., 
Quincy, 02169 or Bob and 
Jan Kelley, 15 Bower Rd., 
Unit F-3, Quincy, 02169. 



Players can sign up as a 
foursome or be assigned to 
a team by the committee. 

No spiked shoes are 
allowed. Soft spikes and 
sneakers are required. 

For more information, 
call479-9045 or 479-1440. 



South Shore YMCA Golf Classic At Thorny Lea 



NORFOLK COUNTY 
WOMEN'S CLASSIC 



PRESIDENTS QOLF COURSE - JULY 9 

GROSS 

1 . 67 - Jane Heggie/Jane Welch 

2. 69 - Ram Mansbach/Pam Kiley 

3. 70 - Karen Richardson/Laura Torrisi 
4. 72 - Melanie Curtin/Carol Rapoli 
NET 
1 . 64 - Marcie Arndd/Mary Love 

NET 

1 . 58 • Sandra Jordan/Carol Cahlll 
2. 60 • Janice Morin/R(k}efta McCann 
3. 60 - Kathy Deady/Mary Von Frey 

4. 62 - Betsy Witt/Sue Nurse 
GROSS 
1 . 74 • Rusty Murphy/Sue Martineili 

NET 

1. 54 - Barb RobertsorVDvis Cronin 

2. 63 - Mai Nestor/Barbara Doneiin 
3. 65 - Lainey HankxVDtame O'DonneH 
4. 65 - Patty Buck/Kim McDovvell 
GROSS 
1.84 -Carol Davenport 



The South Shore YMCA 
will host its third annual 
golf classic on Monday, 
July 26 at Thorny Lea Golf 
Club in Brockton. 

The fun-filled day will 
include a golf tournament, 
awards dinner, and auction. 
Event proceeds go directly 
to the YMCA's annual sup- 
port campaign, which pro- 
vides fmancial assistance to 
individuals, children, and 
families who otherwise 
could not afford YMCA 



programs and services. 

Many South Shore busi- 
nesses are showing their 
support for this worthy 
cause by sponsoring the 
event and donating auction 
items. The YMCA thanks 
Network Plus of Quincy for 
being the gold sponsor. 

The golf tournament is 
full, but tickets are still 
available for the awards 
dinner and auction, which 
begin at 6 p.m. Tickets are 
$40. 



Auction items include: 
two tickets to a practice 
round of the Ryder Golf 
Cup, golf for three with 
Dick Carey at the Charles 
River Country Club, four 
Red Sox tickets on the first 
base line, and other items. 

The South Shore YMCA 
is an association of indi- 
viduals dedicated to im- 
proving the quality of life 
for all through programs 
that promote a healthy body, 
mind, and spirit. Rooted in 
Christian traditions and val- 



ues, the YMCA seeks to 
serve all people, regardless 
of age, sex, race, religion, or 
economic circumstances. 

The YMCA programs 
and services strive to 
strengthen the family, guide 
the youth of today, and meet 
the ever-changing needs of 
our community. 

For more information, 
contact Jill McDonough, 
director of development at 
the South Shore YMCA, at 
(617) 479-8500 cxt. 109. 



Twighlight Hoop Entry Deadline Friday 



Team applications for 
the "Twilight Hoop- 
League to be sponsored by 
the Recreation Depart- 
ment. 

Recreation Director 
Barry Welch said that all 
participants will have the 
opportunity to form their 
own teams. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



The junior and senior 
basketball league will 
have three divisions for 
boys and girls. The senior 
division will consist of 
girls entering grades 10 
through 12. The two junior 
divisions will be for boys 
and girls who are entering 
grades 7, 8, and 9. 

Participants will form 
their own rosters of teams - 
not less that eight players 



and not more than 12 . 
Individual players can 
submit their name to the 
recreation department t to 
be assigned to a team. All 
games will be played on 
outdoor basketball courts. 

Welch said the league 
is part of the Evening 
Recreation Program, 
which has been supervised 
by the Recreation De- 
partmeot sioce October of 



1994. 

Applications are 
available at the Recrea- 
tion Department and all 
supervised recreation pro- 
grams. Entry deadline for 
the free program is Friday, 
July 16. 

Those seeking more 
information or those 
interested in being a 
volunteer coach, are ask^ 
to caU 376-1386. 



1^ 



nuncta;, Jaly 15, l*M Tli* QujMoy 



PifeZI 



Surge Puts Team In Playoff Picture 

Morrisette Reels Off 
Five Straight Victories 



the July 2 game against 
West Roxbury, remaining in 
the regular season, and 
needs to win at least one to 
have a legitimate shot at the 
postseason, which is sched- 
uled to start Friday. Mor- 
risette played games while 
the paper was in print (West 



By CHRIS POISSON 

The fireworks may have 
ended July fourth weekend, 
but the Morrisette American 
Legion baseball team has 
just started to catch fire. 

Morrisette (9-8) beat 
Canton, 5-3, Monday night 
at Canton High School and 
now has reeled off five 
straight wins to climb over ton Wednesday), 
the .500 mark and put itself "It was a good time to 
in the playoff picture. put it together," said Cat- 

"We've done well," said taneo. "It's good to win 
manager Ray Catteneo. games at the end of the sea- 
"We're playing as a team son, but you wonder how 
now and attitudes have many you can lose before 
changed. That's what win- you start to win." 
ning does for you." The recent surge began 

Matt McCann (2-4-1) July 7 when Morrisette 
picked up his second swept a double-header, 
straight win, as he went the beating Milton 15-3 and 
distance, allowing seven hits Quincy 8-3 in the nightcap 
and two runs. McCann had 
pitched well before the win- 
ning streak but wasn't get- 



Against rival Quincy, 
McCann notched his first 
victory of the year as he 
struck out 10 in seven in- 
nings. Flynn went 2 for 2 
with an RBI and Gavin re- 
corded two RBIs on walks 
with the bases loaded! 

Frank Alibrandi had two 



Roxbury Tuesday and Mil- hits and an RBI for Quincy. 

The following night, 
Morrisette topped Quincy 
again, 7-4, in a rematch. 
Bregoli, a shortstop who has 
earned a few starts, tossed a 
complete game, allowing six 
hits and two runs with Hve 
strikeouts. 

Walker went 2 for 4, 
Manning 2 for 3, Gavin 2 
for 4 with a triple and Keith 
Doherty had two RBIs. 

Kevin Walsh picked up 




ting the support from his 
teammates. But that has 
changed. 

Rob Celata went 3 for 3 
with two RBIs and two runs 
scored, while Chris Bregoli 
and John Gavin each 
stroked triples. 

Morrisette has two 
games, and the remainder of 



Celata picked up the win the loss for Quincy. He al- 
against Milton. He pitched lowed only four hits but he 
six innings, yielding four walked seven and allowed 



hits and two runs while 
punching out 12. Celata 
contributed at the plate, go- 
ing 2 for 4 with three RBIs. 

Brian Walker and Shawn 
Manning had three hits 
apiece, and Joe Flynn (three 



six runs in five innings. 



wm 



And in the 6-4 
against Randolph last Fri-> 
day, it was Doherty who 
shined on the hill for Mor- 
risette. He went the dis- 



QUINCY AND BOSTON-based accounting firm Ziner, Kennedy & Lehan sponsored a walk 
to raise money for the Walk for Hunger. The team had 45 participants who raised 
approximately $4,000. Pledges benefit shelters and food programs in 127 communities 
throughout Massachusetts. Team members included, back row, Arom left, Tom Buonopane, 
Nonnan BcHivcau, Mark Hathaway, Jonatiian Tambiah, Kristen White and Christine Power. 
Front, Lisa Norman, Caroline Wilson, Amanda McCauicy and Katie Dalton. 



WoUaston Beach Volleyball 
Challenge Accepting Entries 

The Ward 5 Community ™al* and female players on beach," said Doug Gutro, 
Association, MDC Wollas- each team. Six players per president of the Ward 5 



ton Beach Operations, 
Tony's Clam Shop, and 
Matilda's Boardwalk Cafe 



RBIs) and Joe Thorley (two tance, giving up seven hits 

RBIs) provided some spark and four runs while striking will sponsor the second an- 



with their bats. 



out eight. 



240 Youngsters Compete 
In Hersey Track, Field 

Two hundred forty "volunteers are the heart of 4xl00M Relay, Standing 

youngsters competed in the the program" and thanked Long Jump; Kelly O'Brien, 

22nd Annual Hershey's Na- the work of Quincy Track 4xl00M Relay, 

tional Track and Field local Club Director Geoffrey Boys 9/10 



team will be allowed on the 
court during the day. Teams 
must wear similar colored 
shirts on the day of the tour- 
nament. 

Last year's tournament 
saw team sponsors range 
from community organiza- 
tions, elected officials, po- 
litical candidates, and 



meet at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium sponsored by the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment. 

The boys and girls, ages 
9-14, competed in the long 
jump, Softball throw, 50 
meter dash, 100 meter dash, 
400 meter dash, 4x100 re- 
lay, 800 meter run, and 
1600 meter run in three 
separate age groups. 



Hennessy for his commit- 
ment to this program, as 
well as the members of the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment Staff who officiated at 
the meet. 

The Quincy champions 
and their events follow. 
Girls 9/10 

Mathilde Mouthon, 50M; 
Devin Cahill, lOOM, 200M; 



Jimmall Carruthers, 
50M, Softball Throw; Mark 
Jordan, lOOM, 4xl00M 
Relay; Kevon Mason, 
200M, 4xl00M Relay, 
Standing Long Jump; John 
Kelliher, 400M, 4xlOOM 
Relay; Charkeem Hyatt, 
4xl00M Relay. 
Boys 11/12 

Benson Luc, lOOM, 



nual WoUaston Beach 
Challenge Saturday, Aug. 
21 at 10 a.m. on WoUaston 
Beach. 

To enter a team in this 
year's tournament, contact 
Doug Gutro at 328-7982 or ^^V^ of friends 
Glen McAuliffe of WoUas- 
ton Beach Operations at 
773-7954. 

Teams must consist of a 
minimum of six players and 
a maximum of eight. There 
must be an even number of 



McNamara 
OCL Athlete 
Of The Year 

Frank McNamara, a 1999 
Kerry Regan, 400M; Alysha 4xl00M Relay, Standing North Quincy High School 
The Hershey's Program Williams, 4xl0OM Relay; Long Jump; Nick Malames, graduate, was recently hon 



Tournament winners will 
win prizes including Wol- 
laston Beach baseball caps 
and other summer-related 
gear. 

"Hiis tournament is for 
all of those average athletes 
who enjoy getting together 
with friends for a little exer- 
cise, some friendly compe- 
tition, and a fun day at the 



Community Association. 
"This isn't Pro- Am volley- 
ball. Why not put together 
some friends and give it a 
shot." 

The tournament will be a 

double elimination format 

which will allow each team 

a minimum of two games. 

Entry fee is $75 per team. 

Proceeds from the Woi- 
laston Beach Volleyball 
Challenge will be put to- 
ward educational efforts and 
activities to promote Wol- 
iaston Beach. 

"We want to create ac- 
tivities that will bring 
friends and families back to 
WoUaston Beach and make 
it a pleasurable experience," 
added Gutro. 



is the largest youth sports Emily Milone, 4xl00M 
program of its kind in the Relay; Sarah Dodd, 4xl00M 
United States. It was devel- Relay; Nicole Affannato, 



oped to offer a quality rec- 
reational activity, where 
children have fun and are 
introduced to physical fit- 
ness through basic track and 
field events. 

The winners of the 
Quincy meet will have their 
times or distances compared 



4xl00M Relay, Standing 
Long Jump; Brighid Kyle, 
Softball Throw. 
GIris 11/12 

Erin Malger lOOM, 
4x1 OOM Relay, Standing 
Long Jump; Nicole Cahill 
200M; Lisa McKeon, 
400M, 4xl00M Relay; 



to boys and girls who com- Kayla Martin 800M; Emily 
pete in some 70 other meets 
state wide. The top 16 in 
each event will be invited to 



200M, 4xl00M Relay, 
Softball Throw; Matt Curtis, 
400M, 800M; Keith 
Losordo, 4xl00M Relay; 
Sean Joyce, 4xl00M Relay. 

Boys 13/14 

James Coughlin, lOOM, 
4x1 OOM Relay; Jimmorie 
Carrathers, 200M; Mike 
O'Malley, 800M; Robert 
Richards, 1600M; Kevin 



ored as the Old Colony 
League Athlete of the Year 
by WATD (95.9), a South 
Shore radio station. 

Bill Wilhelm presented 
the award to McNamara a 
few weeks ago. 

McNamara, 18, was the 
captain of NQ's football and 
basketball teams and was 
also the class president 
during his senior year. 

He scored two TD's in 
NQ's 21-6 victory against 




compete in the state cham- 
pionship to be held Friday, 
July 16, at Braintree High 
School. 

The wiimers of the state 
meet will have their time 



Holleran, 4xl00M Relay; 
Keohan, 4xlOOM Relay; Jinmiy Burke, 4xl00M Re- 
Kristin O'Toole 4xl00M lay; Sean O'Keefe, 4xl00M rival Quincy in the 66th 
Relay; Kristin Pinnix, Soft- Relay, Softball Throw, annual Thanksgiving Day 



ball Throw. 
Girls 13/14 

Natasha Waibel, lOOM; 
Nicole Zielinski, 200M, 
Softball Throw; Brenna 



Standing Long Jump. football game, ending a 

This is the 22nd year that four-year drought. 

Quincy Recreation has McNamara will attend 

competed in this event. The Plymouth State College this 

Quincy meet has sent par- fall to play Division III 

ticipants to the State Finals football. 



for 22 of 22 years and to the 
National finals for 17 of 22 



He is currently playing 
baseball for the WoUaston 
Babe Ruth team. 



O'Brien 800M, 4xlOOM 
and distances compared Relay; Amy Lee, 1600M; 
with other New England Siobhan Green, 4xl00M 
State Champions and the tip Relay; Makini Thompson, years, Welch said, 
qualifiers will go to the Na- 

North Quincy High Freshmen 
Soccer Tryouts Information 

Freshman boys entering shcMild cootact head coach achod is in wtsaaa. 

North Quincy Hi^ School , Robert Dano immediately to 

in SqHonbn who are inter- get informaticm on tryouts, 

ested Id playiag soccer whidi start tiie week before 



tional Championship m 
Hershey Park, PA. All ex- 
penses for national qualifi- 
ers are paid by Hershey 
Park, and no fee are charged 
at any level. 

Recreation Director 
Barry Welch notes that 



For more 
773-9087. 



details call 



by Tony Centorino, Kevin McGroarty and Bill Starkie 

DAY UGHTS 

It may seem contradictory to their products with this feature, 
see automobiles driving along dur- Our ASE Certified service tech- 
ing daylight hours with their head- nidtvis at UEO& WALTS SUNOCO 
lights on. Daytime njnning NgNs, wi do ttieir part in maidng sure your 
however, do make sense in terms car is propwiy maintained for maxi- 
of safety t>y making vehkHes more mum perfbrrnance and effkaency, 
conspk:uous. The lights have t)een whether it is something as simple 
mandatory on new cars in Canada as repiackig a headfight, to more 
since the Iwginning of the decade, complex engme work. Here at 258 
and most Scandanavian nations QuiricyAve.?E.)Braintree(781-843- 
have been using them for up to two 1550) we kMkfooward to meeting 
decades. These northern-latitude you and to giving your car the same 
cou^ries were the first to adopt level of personal attentkxi we ^ 
(taytimemnning lights because ttiey our own. Count on us for propane 
work be^ in the dim light associ- forgrls, mobile homes and oon- 
ated with kxig twighlight. In any verted vehides. We are 'A Ptace 
case, several studies from Europe, Where Your Car Can Uve Longer.' 
Canada and this country have HINT: The Insurance Institute 
shown that daytime omning ights for Nghway Safely esKmales that 
probablyhelpreduoedaylimemulli- ctaytime mrming Ights codd help 
car crashes. Thus, increasing num- averthundradsoftwusandsofcol- 
bers of car makers are outlKtfng fisfons each year. 

>/aMf Of THi ABtCPROfiMi 

(Dh/i8k)n of Leo & Waifs Sukxx)) 

BOTTUES RLLED BY THE POUND 

Mo flat nt0, you g&t what you pay fort 



^^5 MS-li 



IhR't Smocb 



B 



Page 24 Tlf Qitiney Siu* TiMirwtoy, Jwly 15, 1999 ^^^ 

Elks Capture Second 
Straight Championship 



Jaehnig Clinches Third 
Consecutive League Title 



The Elks captured their 
second consecutive Babe 
Ruth League championship, 
and fourth of the '90s, with 
a 12-4 triumph against 
Granite City Electronic in 
the final game. 

Trailing 3-0, the Elks 
bounced back with eight 
runs in the bottom of third 
inning and never looked 
back. Pat Bregoli ripped a 
two-run single with the 
bases loaded to cut the lead 
to one. Consecutive walks 
to Steve Reardon, Ryan To- 
bin and Erik McGinnis 
pushed across the winning 
runs. 

Joey Priscella pounded 



BABE RUTH 



-t 



out three singles and Bregoli 
added two for the Elks' of- 
fense. Dan Duggan had an 
outstanding playoff series as 
he reached base eight 
straight times in the final 
two games. 

Justin Hall played flaw- 
less ball at second base. 

The Elks reached the 
finals after Chris Ham 
tossed his second shutout, 
allowing three hits in a 6-0 
win against Barry's Deli. 

Bregoli knocked in two 
runs and Reardon had one 



RBI. 

Brian O'Hanley pitched 
the semi-final win, pitching 
a one-hitter against Granite 
City. Mike Boyle stroked a 
double in the second inning 
for Granite City's only hit. 

Duggan led the way on 
offense with four hits while 
Bregoli, Hall and McGinnis 
chipped in with one apiece. 

Granite City's Tom 
Hughes was tough from the 
hill, allowing only four hits 
while farming six. 



P.A.L. Rallies In Thrillers 



The postseason produces 
some of the most exciting 
games of the season, and 
Quincy P.A.L. was involved 
in two thrillers in recent 
Triple A action. 

Quincy P.A.L. rallied for 
four runs in the bottom of 
the sixth inning to edge out 
Spillane & Epstein, 7-6. 

Domenic Poli (5-0-1 
regular season, 2-0 playoffs) 
picked up the win with a 13- 
strikeout performance. 

John Grillo led off the 
sixth with a single to left 
field. Poli (t>vo hits) dou- 
bled him h6me with a shot 
to right-center. Jason Purves 
tied the game when he 
legged out an inside-the- 
park home run. 

Danny Poggi smacked a 
triple and scored the win- 
ning run on an overthrow at 
third base. 

Alex Hardey played a 




strong game and John 
Benoit picked up his first hit 
of the playoffs. 

For Spillane & Epstein, 
Ryan Donovan had a two- 
run double and made nu- 
merous defensive plays at 
shortstop. Brendan Masters 
had an RBI and scored two 
runs, and Matt Young had 
seven strikeouts in the loss. 
Quincy PA.L. - 10 
Local 2222 - 9 

Jason Purves kept PAL 
in the game for six innings 
then decided enough was 
enough as he scored the 
winning run in the seventh. 

In the extra inning, Pur- 
ves (three hits, three runs) 
singled, stole second and 
third base and then crossed 



the plate on a wild pitch to 
end the game. He also 
pitched six innings and 
struck out 14. 

John Murray pitched a 1- 
2-3 seventh (two strikeouts) 
to earn the win. 

John Grillo had a two- 
run single to tie the game in 
the fourth inning and Steve 
Yovino reached base five 
times with three hits and 
two walks. 

For Local 2222, Corey 
Lumaghini smashed two 
long balls, one in the first to 
give his team the lead and 
then a three-run blast to 
send the game into extra 
innings in the sixth. 

Matt Palmer struck out 
eight in the loss. 



Jaehnig Chiropractic won 
three games in recent 
Quincy Junior League 
Baseball action to clinch the 
regular season league 
championship with a 19-1 
record. 

It marks the third year in 
a row, and five of the last 
six, that Jaehnig has been 
crowned American League 
champs. 

Jaehnig Chiropractic - 8 
Burgin-Platner-Huriey - 3 

Dave Jaehnig went 3 for 
3 with triple and two RBIs 
to pace Jaehnig over sec- 
ond-place Burgin-Platner. 
Jaehnig also did it from the 
mound, striking out 13 and 
walking just one. 

Mo Al Khatib went 3 for 
3, while Jon O'Conner 
added two hits and Matt 
Jaehnig chipped in with a 
double. 

Jim Garrigan beat out an 
infield hit and scored an 
insurance run when Jon Al- 
len laid down a perfect 
squeeze bunt. 

Hard throwing Justin 
Thorley suffered his first 
loss of the year despite fan- 
ning 11. Jon Fitzpatrick and 
Mike Powers had two hits 
apiece for Burgin-Platner's 
offense. 

Jaelinig Chiropractic • 14 
Burlie Club - 5 

Jaehnig used its long 
distance calling card in this 
match up, smashing four 
home runs in the win. 

Chris Marinelli belted 
two dingers, Dave Jaehnig 
launched one into the park- 
ing lots and also had two 
doubles and Mo Al Khatib 
cracked a homer and added 



JUNIOR LEAGUE 



-t 



a single. 

John Fitzgerald, Matt 
Tobin, Kevin Donovan, 
Matt Jaehnig, Nick Al 
Khatib, Jon O'Conner and 
Jim Garrigan each hit safely 
for Jaehnig. 

Tobin whiffed five in 
two innings of work to pick 
up his fourth win of the sea- 
son. 

Steve Straz was 3 for 3, 
while Wendell Cosgrove 
and Zack Eaton added two 
hits each for Burke. 

Lourmi Papalambros 
made an Omar Vizquel-like 
barehanded catch and throw 
from his shortstop position. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic - 16 
Kiwanis - 1 

Dave Jaehnig (6-0) 
tossed his second one-hitter 
of the season (to go along 
with a no-hitter) to anchor 
his team to a win. He struck 
out 11 and also had four hits 
and three runs scored. 

Robbie Dolbec went 3 
for 3 with three RBIs to earn 
the game ball. John Fitzger- 
ald, Kevin Donovan and 
Matt Jaehnig had two hits 
each. 

Andrew Donovan had 
Kiwanis' lone hit and run 
scored. Matt Breslin pitched 
four strong innings before 
being lifted in the fifth. 
Kiwanis - 5 
Rotary • 1 

Billy Dwyer pitched a 
one-hitter and punched out 
10 to give Kiwanis its 10th 
win of the season. 

Mike Garland had two 



hits, inciudmg a first-inning 
home run, and Dewey 
Donovan had two RBIs. 
Dennis Layden legged out a 
triple in the first inning and 
also played great in center- 
field. 

Dan O'Connell picked 
up the only hit in the second 
inning for Rotary. 
Beacon Sporting Goods - 8 
Colonial Federal • 5 

Dean Sandonato taught 
Colonial a lesson in power 
pitching as he struck out 17. 
Paul Lenon and Evan 
Harrington had three hits 
each, and Paul Noonan 
added two hits to provide 
the offense. 

For Colonial, John San- 
ton had a three-bagger and 
Raymond Marchaud and 
Kevin Dudguen each had 
doubles. 

Beacon Sporting Goods - 9 
S. S. Buick -3 

Beacon scored six runs in 
the seventh to knock off 
S.S. Buick in extra innings. 

It was a pitchers game 
for six innings, as Beacon's 
Dean Sandonato (14 strike- 
outs) and S. S. Buick's John 
Folino (8) kept hitters off- 
balance. Rob Baker pitched 
the seventh to earn the vic- 
tory. 

Steve Maggio had the 
game-winning hit and made 
an outstanding catch in left 
field. Paul Lenon, Sando- 
nato, Matt Rhode and Evan 
Hanington had extra base 
hits. 

Mike Griffin had two hits 
for S.S. Buick. 



Burgin-Platner Hurley Posts Two Playoff Victories 



In recent Quincy Junior 
League baseball action, 
Burgin-Platner Hurley won 
its first two playoff games 
after closing out the season 
with an 18-4 record and a 
four-game winning streak. 
Burgin-Platner Hurley - 2 
Beacon Sporting Goods - 1 

In its latest playoff game, 
BPH had to squeak a win 
out. Tony Pepdjonovic (11 



strikeouts) picked up the 
win in a pitcher's duel 
against Dean Sandonato. 

Justin Thorley walked 
and stole first, second and 
home to score the winning 
run. Mike Powers had a 
single and a double. 
Burgin-Platner Hurley - 7 
Elks-0 



formance and had a double 
and two singles to pace his 
team to its first playoff win. 
Tony Pepdjonovic had 
two hits and four RBIs, 
while Mike Powers 
(double), Pat Malone 
(double). Matt Boyle and 
Tom Ross chipped in at the 
plate 



Lions - 3 

Ten-year-old Anthony 
Gilbody dominated from the 
mound in the final regular 
season game. 

Tony Pepdjonovic 
homered, tripled, singled 
and had five RBIs, while 
Mike Powers (three hits). 



Burgin-Platner Hurley - 5 
Rotary - 4 

Justin Thorley 's two-run 
double in the final inning 
pulled out a one-run win for 
BPH. 



scored five runs in the Ave 
inning to pull out the win. 

Justin Thorley, Tom 
Ross, Bob Newcomb and 
Pat Malone all tripled. 
Kevin Adams and Matt 



Ryan Collyer pitched Boyle doubled. Tony 
well and Bob Newcomb had Pepdjonovic pitched well. 



two hits. 



Justin Thorley pitched a Burgin-Platner Hurley 
one-hit, 16-strikeout per- 15 



Justin Thorley (two hits) Burgin-Platner Hurley • 9 

and Bob Newcomb (two Elks -4 

hits) added to the offense. in a 4-4 game, BPH 



Stick with W JDA and ^iln! 



WJDA's 1999 Bumper Sticker Giveaway 



Winning is easy! 



STOP 



...at a participating sponsor location! Including: 

Avwon Battery. 142 Old Colony Avenue, Qamcy, Hancock Tire & Appliance. 115 Franklin Street, South Quincy; E^dfi 
Vision. 470 Southern Artery, Quincy; Stephen Leigh Jewelers. 1414 Hancock Street, (Quincy Center, Bank of Canton. 
275 Qaincy Avenue, (Quincy; Dick's Gas Grille Store. 1581 Main Street, South Weymouth 



LfiOK! ...for the 1999 WJDA Bumper Sticker! 

Take one and put it on your car! 



MCTpMI ...to 1300*WJDA weekdays at 7:20ain and 12:05pm! 

■ If you hear your plate called, call 617479-1300 within 13 
minutes to claim $50 WJDA Dollars you can use at any 
participating sponsor location! 



Thanks for listening. 




1 300 » WJDA 

South Shore Broadcarting Company 



Burgin-Platner Hurley - 3 
Colonial Federal - 

Justin Thorley tossed a 
three-hitter and punched out 
12, bringing his regular sea- 
son total to 122 in 60 in- 
nings. He also had a single 
and a double. 

Jimmy Fitzpatrick had 
two hits (double, triple) as 
did Tony Pepdjonovic. 
Beacon Sporting Goods - 3 
Keohanes - 1 

Rob Baker struck out 
seven and Dean Sandonato 
smashed a home ran to lead 
the team. Matt Rhode and 
Paul Noonan were a defen- 
sive tandem. 

For Keohanes, Mark 
Kisiel had two hits, while 
Joe Renkin had one. 
Beacon Sporting Goods - 3 
Kiwanis - 2 

Paul Lennon picked up 
the win and Dean Sandonato 
pitched well in relief as 
Beacon locked up third 
place with a 15-5-1 record. 

Joe Cafano tied the game 
with a double and Adam 
Tragellis hit the game- 
wiimer. 

Evan Harrington, Matt 
Rhode, Rob Baker and Paul 
Noonan all played well de- 
fensively. 



i ' 



TTwiKtoy. July IS, 1999 TTb* Qulney BuMk Pigt 25 



RELieieN 



United Methodist 



Union Congregational 



Quincy Point Congregational 



The Rev. Carol Stine will 
preach at the 10 a.m. wor- 
ship service Sunday at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 Beale 
St., WoUaston. 

Assisting in the liturgy 
will be Don^y Nogueira. 
Ann Pierce will be the 



greeter and Gary and Joanne 
Smith will be the ushers. 
Hosting the coffee hour will 
be Annia Giger and Shirley 
Poore. 

During July and August, 
Music Director Pen 
McDonald will present short 
monologues on the musical 
history of church hymns. 



Bethany Congregational 



Rev. George Hodgkins 
will conduct the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center. 

His sermon will be "My 
Strength and My Song." 

The Lemonade in the 
Shade Church School will 
meet at the same hour. 
Scripture Reader will be 
Corinne Mikami. 

Music for the service will 
be provided by Thomas 
Boyer, organist, and Shirley 
Pyne, soprano. Childcare is 



provided for infants and 
toddlers. 

Greeters will be Helen 
Krasinski and Gloria Mor- 
gan. Fellowship Hour will 
beheld in Allen Parlor fol- 
lowing the worship service. 

The Mid- Week Concert 
on Wednesday, July 21 at 
12:15 p.m. will feature Pris- 
cilla Hallberg, violinist, and 
Elizabeth Hodges, pianist. 

A luncheon will be avail- 
able following the concert. 
Cost is $3. 



The Lord's Planting 



Guest preacher Rev. Phil 
Wilson will give the sermon 
"Living Life with Joy" at 
the 11 a.m. service Sunday 
at the Lord's Planting, 
Quincy Foursquare Church, 
65 Newbury Ave., North 
Quincy. 

For transportation to the 
service, call 847-4444. The 



church is handicap accessi- 
ble. 

Following the service, a 
neighborhood picnic will be 
held at Welcome Park, end 
of Sagamore St., North 
Quincy. The picnic will 
feature food and games and 
a fire department "hose 
down" if the weather is hot. 



United First Parish 



Members will hold a 
summer worship service 
Sunday at 11:30 a.m. at 
United First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist), 
1306 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

The focus of the service 
will be "Why Arc We Here 
This Morning?" Jane Pen- 
theny will light the chalice. 
Su McCarthy, Ruth Levit- 
sky and Ed Smith will offer 
personal reflections. 

Norman Corey, music 
director, will play organ 
selections during the serv- 
ice. April Bargout and Ian 
Mackenzie will usher. 

Visitors and newcomers 
are welcome and invited to 
social hour following the 



service in the Parish Hall 
hosted by i^ril Bargout. 

Another mid-summer 
worship service is planned 
Sunday, Aug. 5 at 9:30 a.m. 
Regular weekly worship 
services and church school 
will resume Sunday, Sept. 
12 at 10:30 a.m. 

The Visitor Tour pro- 
gram, which provides tours 
of the sanctuary and crypt 
where Presidents John 
Adams and John Quincy 
Adams and their wives are 
entombed, is open seven 
days a week. For more in- 
formation on the tour pro- 
gram, call 773-0062. 

For more information 
about United First Parish 
Church, call 773-1290. . 



Lien Chenh City Year Graduate 



Lien Chenh recently 
completed a year of service 
with City Year Boston. 

Chenh was one ot nearly 
200 City Year graduates 
who recently completed 
1,700 hours of service in 
Boston schools, community 
centers, City Year camps 
and after-school programs. 
They have taught an 
HIV/AIDS and domestic 
violence curriculum, reno- 
vated numerous play- 



grounds and impro^'ed sen- 
ior citizens' homes through- 
out the past year. 

City Year Boston, an 
AmeriCorps program, is a 
national service organiza- 
tion which unites young 
adult ages 17-24 from di- 
verse cultural , racial and 
socio-economic back- 
grounds for a demanding 
year of full-time community 
service, leadership devel- 
opment and civic engage- 
ment. 



Joseph Lavin On Dean's List 

Joseph P. Lavin, of College, Rhode Island 
Quincy is on the spring se- He is a sophomore ac- 
mester Dean 's List at Bryant counting major. 



We need 
you. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UFE 



American Heait 
AssodatioDJ 







Freebird skippered by 
Rev. John Swanson of Un- 
ion Congregational Church, 
Wollaston, placed third in 
the Lipton Cup PHRA Class 
E Ocean Race Saturday. 

Robert Boussy, former 
church deacon, was sailing 
master. Church moderator 



Mark Doolittle was helms- 
man. 

Frefcbird, a 26-foot Pear- 
son sloop, completed the 
6.S-mile course off Boston 
Light in under three hours. 

Sunday's sermon is "All 
things Work Together for 
Good." 



Houglis Neck CongregationaJ 



Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
conduct the 9:30 a.m. wor- 
ship service Sunday at 
Houghs Neck Congrega- 
tional Church. 

The message will be 
given by Rev. M. AHcia 



Corea on the topic, "No 
Time Like The Present." 

A coffee hour follows the 
service. Everyone is wel- 
come. 

The sanctuary is air con- 
ditioned. 



The theme for Rev. 
Cherie Daniel of Quincy 
Point Congregational 
Church, 444 Washington 
St. at Sunday's 9 a.m. 
worship will be "God Is 
Always With Us". 

Caryl Dreghorn will 
serve as lay reader. Jack 
Bissett will serve as 
Deacon of the Day. Music 
is directed by interim 
music director Paul 
Thistle, with Lutfullah 
Bulent Guneralp. tenor. 

Taylo( Ashleigh Kaupp, 
daughter of Steven and 
Susan Kau(>p of Wollaston 



will be baptized. 

Child care is provided. 
Summer Sunday sessions 
are held for children of 
preschool age through 
Grade 8. Bible stories, 
games, crafts and music 
will also be held. 

Following the worship, 
fellowship will be held in 
Social Hall. 

For those who cannot 
attend the service, they 
may watch it on Channel 3 
Wednesday at 6 p.m. and 
Thursday at noon. 

Summer worship ser- 
vice is at 9 a.m. through 
Sept. 5. 



(I^uiucii iVciit\imi ilircctaru 



SI R\ n IS cv: \( riMTirs 



^.y*. ->rt"r*^ ir^^'ps^ 



JMhyfs 

phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Cregory E. WhtHon, Rutor 

Summer Worship 
Schedule Sunday, 10am 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Contefnporiry Worship 
■ •Marriage & FanWiy Group 
■I •Intemationai Fellowship 
^^. •DivorceCaie 






Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

Masses: 
Saturday 4:30PM 
Sunday 9AM & 11AM .' 
Daily Mass 9AM 



Church Of St John 
The Baptist 

44 School St, Quiney 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Dally 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p. m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

IUuhWi tfifnnl Acctutlbis 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Str99t 

Quincy, MA 02159 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 11 :30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessible A 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air ccxxXtiorwd 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A fkmm CaVtoUc Convnunity waUdng togettter 

in Faith, Wor^, Etkics^on and Sen/ioe' 

386 Hancock SL, North Quincy, MA 02171 

(t17)32»Ma8 

Sunday ItaMM 

4pm (Sal.) 7:45am, Sam (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (witti Cho^ 12 noon and 5pm 

\Ateei(day Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 



'p^-mr7ywnm^-- 



STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, HA 3284)866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptism. 2nd Sunday.' 1 1: 15AM 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock StraK WoNaiton • 47»4400 

Pastor: Rev. Thomas Keane 

Weeicend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7.-00, 8:45, 11 KXMM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

HandJcaooed ChairlHt AveilMe 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St.. Quincy • 773-0120 
Masses 

Satimiay. 4pm, Sunday 7. 9:30 
a 1 1:30am, Weekda^ Sam 

Htntctpptd AcotuUt 

New Members Welcome! 



Conyegsttonal ^ 



HOUGHS NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Mdnet Avenue, Quincy 

Wmre The Star Of Love Shines' 

Services of Worship 

9:30am 

Wheelchair accessibte 
Air conditioned 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

9AM Sunday Worship 

Church School with Child Care Provided 

'GodisAtmysVm^Us' 

Pantry Shelf Sunday 

Rev. Cherie Daniel Assoc. Pastor 



SaL 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



UNION CONfiREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach Street & Rawson Rd.. Wollaston 

479-6661 

Rev. John Carl Swanson. pastor 

Sunday Worship 10AM 

'All Things Work Together For Good' 

~ Episcopal 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Comer of Haiicock & Lioden Sts. 
Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 

Rev. Claude Smith 

Sunday Worship 

9:30am 

Morning Prayer with 

Sermon and Eucharist 

CliHd care provided 

■ Evtryltody Welcome 
Thrift Shop Closed for the Summer 




TOADVEl^SE IN THIS DIRECTORY, 
FLEASE CALL 471-319$ 



Congregational 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Comer of Spear i Coddington Sta. , 

Quincy Center '479-7300 

10am Worship Sen/ice 

Rev. George Hodgkins preaching 

'My Strength and My Song' 

Lemonade In The Shade Church School 

Foursquare Gospel 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Corner of Newbury Ave. A 

Sagamorm St.. N. Quincy • 847-4444 

Guest preacher Rev. Phil Wilson 

'Living Life With Joy' 

Philippians 3:1-11 




QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St.. Wollaston 

773-3319 

Sunday WorsNp 10AM 

Rev. Carol A. Stine, pastor 

Nazarene-; 



fr 



Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston, 472-5669 

Rt¥. Smnm^ Omng: Ptslor 
QulHcy Oilntte Church ol Vit Mutnee 

Sunday Servicas. 8:45Mn Holy Conmunon 

9:30am Cantonese Worship (AngeR ChapflO 

9:45am Christian Education (^ ^)0s) 

11am Moming Worship Celebration 

* M«My Care and Children's Church through grade 4 

6pni Evening Service (contemporary) 

The WoMaslon Church oHheNearene is 

arcondUontd and mtheekhair accessible. 

AilAREWELCXm 



estant 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St, Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PMTUES WOMEN*^ FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spiritualist 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St., Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Swvice Wednesdays ^xn 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. Berkowitz. C.H..C.M. 




TOADVERTISE 
IN THIS 
DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE 
CALL 
471-3100 



Piiigc26 Tlf Quinoyemi Thnraday, July 15, 1999 



CCITUAPIES 



Adeline H. George, 103 

Member Of St Chrysostom's Church 



Paul J. Doherty, 59 

Assistant City Auditor 



Robert F. MacRae, 42 

National Guard Veteran 



A funeral service for 
Adeline Heath (Coburn) 
George, 103, of Quincy, a 
member of St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church for more 
than 60 years, was held 
Monday at St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. George died July 7 
in Duxbury. 

Born in Melrose, she 
lived most of her life in 
Quincy. She moved to Bay 
Path Nursing home in Dux- 
bury in 1986. 

She was a member of the 



She was a member of the 
Protestant Guild at St. 
Chrysostom's Church. 

Wife of the late Selden 
W. George, she is survived 
by a son, Charles E. George 
of Acton; two daughters, 
Alicia Seavey of Cohasset 
and D. Marjorie Hull of 
California; nine grandchil- 
dren and four great-great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Wollaston 



WoUaston Chapter of the Chapel of the Deware Fu- 

Order of Eastern Star and neral Home, 576 Hancock 

served on the advisory St. 

board for the Wollaston Donations may be made 

Assembly of Rainbow for to St. Chrysostom's Episco- 

Girls for many years. pal Church. 

John F. Marella, 46 



A funeral Mass for John 
F. Marella, 46, of Quincy, a 
cook, was celebrated Mon- 
day at St. Ann's Church. 

Mr. Marella died July 9 
at his home. 

He was a cook at various 
food establishments. 

Born in Boston, Mr. 
Marella was a lifelong 
Quincy resident. He gradu- 
ated from Quincy High 
School i^' 1970. 



He is survived by a son, 
Stephen P. Marella of 
Quincy; his father, Patrick 
"Patsy" Marella of Wey- 
mouth and two sisters, 
Patrcia A. Marella of 
Quincy and Denise Ber- 
gonzi of Braintree. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Concetta ^Tina' Christian 



A funeral Mass for Con- 
cetta "Tina" (Carella) 
Christian of Quincy was 
celebrated July 9 at St. John 
the Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Christian died July 
6. 

Wife of the late John R. 
Christian, she is survived by 
four children, Richard, John, 
Joanne and Teresa, three 
grandsons and a great- 



grandson. 

Burial was in St. Francis 
Xavier Cemetery, Wey- 
mouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Hamel, Wickens 
and Troup)e Funeral Home. 

Donations may be made 
to the Old Colony Hospice, 
14 Page Terrace, Stoughton 
02072. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



past slower motorists . 



A Thought 
For The Week 

Courtesy indicates good manners. It in- 
vcrives equal consideration for all people 
alike, regardless of status or importance . . 
. or area or location. And tills certainly 
holds true on streets and highways. Quite 
often, good mancers are shelved and ig- 
nored in the driving habits of people who 
otherwise are fairiy well-mannered . . . 
You see this in drivers squealing cars 
You see it in the blasting of horns the second 
the light turns green . . . You see it in gestures and words of retaliation 
when bad manners of one induces bad manners in another. Bad 
manners probably cause as many accidents in driving as any other 
cause. 

On holiday week-ends, especially when traffic is heavy, good 
driving manners are really needed . . .Giving the other feUow a break 
by means of common courtesy can definitely reduce traffic accidents 
« hkh cause so much human misery • and property damage. Cour- 
tesy on the road has NEVER • nor will it ever degrade a driver .. . . 
How courteous a driver are you? 

Deware Family Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 

Wollaston Chapel Hannel Chapel 

576 Hancock Street 86 Copeland Street 

Quincy, MA 02170 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

A (617) 472-1137 
AffordabUity Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Give. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UPE 



American Hc^ 
AssodatKNiJ 



r 




A funeral Mass for Paul 
J. Doherty, 59, of Quincy, 
assistant city auditor in 
Quincy, was celebrated July 
10 at St. Joseph Church. 

Mr. Doherty died July 7 
at home. 

He was assistant auditor 
for 15 years. 

Bom and raised in Cam- 
bridge, Mr. Doherty was a 
1957 graduate of Matignon 
High School and a 1962 
graduate of Boston College 
where he received a bache- 
lor's degree in accounting. 

He also earned a master's 
degree in history from Bos- 
ton College and a master's 
in institutional advancement 
from Creighton University. 

Following college, Mr. 
Doherty entered the Society 
of Jesus. While a Jesuit, Mr. 



Doherty taught history and 
coached the debate team at 
both Boston College High 
School in Dorchester and 
Bishop Cheverus High 
School in Portland, Maine. 

After leaving the order, 
he taught at Quincy College. 

He was a member of St. 
Joseph Parish. 

Mr. Doherty enjoyed 
gardening and reading. 

He is survived by a sis- 
ter, Eileen R. McLynch of 
Manchester, N.H.; a brother, 
Richard J. Mangan of West 
Roxbury; three nephews and 
a niece. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



A funeral Mass for Rob- 
ert F. MacRae, 42, of 
Quincy, a National Guard 
veteran and employee of 
Eastern Processing in Hing- 
ham for two years, was 
celebrated July 10 at the 

Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mr. MacRae died July 7 
at Quincy Hospital. 

He enjoyed boating, 
fishing and watching old 
movies. 

Born and educated in 
Quincy, he lived in Quincy 
most of his life. 

He is survived by his 
mother, Doris M. (Keefe) 
MacRae of Quincy; a 
brother, William T. MacRae 



Jr. of Boston; a sister, 
Doreen E. Killion of Hing- 
ham; two nephews; and 
many aunts, uncles and 
cousins. He was also the son 
of the late William T. Mac- 
Rae. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St 

Donations may be made 
to the American Lung Asso- 
ciation, 1505 Common- 
wealth Ave., Brighton 
02135 or to the American 
Cancer Society South Re- 
gional Center, 1115 West 
Chestnut St., Brockton 
02401. 



Timothy L. Dunlea, 90 

Retired MBTA Maintenance Worker 



Thomas J. Kelly, 52 

Susse Chalet Employee 



A funeral service for 
Thomas J. Kelly, 52, of 
Quincy, formerly of Whit- 
man, an employee at the 
Susse Chalet in Dorchester 
and a Vietnam War Air 
Force veteran, was con- 
ducted Tuesday at the 
Banchard Funeral Chapel. 

Mr. Kelly died July 8 at 
Quincy Hospital. 

He shuttled cancer pa- 
tients to local hospitals 
while working at the Susse 
Chalet. He had also worked 
as a U.S. marshal and a po- 
lice officer in Chatham. 

Mr. Kelly also worked at 
Supreme Industrial Products 
in Randolph. 

He was a member of the 
Eagles, Moose and Knights 
of Columbus and served as 
a Big Brother. He collected 



model trains for more than 
40 years. 

Bom in Boston, he lived 
13 years in Whitman before 
moving to Quincy 25 years 
ago. 

He is survived by a son, 
Edmund Kelly of Whitman; 
a daughter, Lea Kelly of 
Bridgewater; his former 
wife, Elaine (Normandin) 
Kelly of Carver; and many 
other family members and 
friends. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Blanchard Funeral 
Chapel. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart As- 
sociation, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham 01701. 



A funeral Mass for 
Timothy L. Dunlea, 90, of 
Quincy, a retired mainte- 
nance worker for the 
MBTA, was celebrated July 
8 at St. John the Baptist 
Church. 

Mr. Dunlea died July 5 at 
South Shore Hospital after a 
Drief illness. 

Mr. Dunlea worked 35 
years for the MBTA, retir- 
ing in 1974. 

He was a longtime mem- 
ber of the Carmen's Union 
Local 589. 

Born and educated in 
Boston, he lived in Dor- 
chester for many years and 
in Quincy for the last four 



years. 

Husband of the late Mar- 
garet M. (Fitzpatrick) Dun- 
lea, he is survived by two 
daughters, Ellen Marie Cor- 
bett of Rockland and Patri- 
cia A. Sharpe of Braintree; a 
sister, Helen A. Mullin of 
Quincy; nine grandchildren; 
seven great-grandchildren; 
and many nephews and 
nieces. He was the father of 
the late Dennis J. Dunlea. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 



Frederick H. Cook, 76 

Retired Burner, Navy Veteran 



A funeral service for 
Frederick H. "Cookie" 
Cook, 76, of Quincy, a re- 
tired burner for General 
Dynamics at the Fore River 
Shipyard, was held July 8 at 




DENNIS SWEENEY 
FUNERAL HOMES 

Quincy 's First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney Joseph M. Reardon 

Funeral Directors 

74 Elm Street • 326 Copeland Street • 617-773-2728 



the D-^nnis Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St. 

Mr. Cook died July 4 at 
the St. John of God Hospital 
in Brighton. 

He was a 20-year veteran 
of the Navy having served 
during World War II, the 
Korean War and into the 
Vietnam era. 

Born, raised and edu- 
cated in Bangor, Maine, he 
had lived in Quincy since 
1966. 

He is survived by his 
wife. Carmen (Gomez Gar- 
cia) Cook; a son, Paul Cook 
of Virginia; three daughters, 
Maryjane D'Orazio, Rosa 
Pierce and Mary Arruda, all 
of Quincy; a brother, Paul 
Cook of Lowell; five grand- 
children and four great 
grand children. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 




Professional 
Dignified ■ Affordable 



Crematicr Scciety cf Massactusetts 

Considering cremation? 

The increase in cremation is a dramatic worldwide trend, 
mirrored in Massachusetts, where cremation has become an 
economical and dignified alternative. 

We have a Free Brochure which will answer 1 5 of the most 
commonly asked questions regarding cremation. 

If cremation is your choice, consider acting now to ensure 
that your wishes are fulfilled. For a copy of our no-obligatlon 
brochure, call 1-800-696-5887 (or 61 7-472-0098) today. 
Visit our website at www.cremation.org 



lL4 



i,^. 



TlOTday^JiilylS^lfW Th^Qulnoygun Vrngtll 



John W. Powers, Jr., 63 

LoDgtime Postal Employee 



Allen J. Wahlberg, Sn, 62 

Ekctriciaii, Air Force Veteran 



*•> 



Edmund J. Gulnto, Sn, 59 

Retired Forkllfl Operator 



A funeral Mass for John ing in the Marine Corps for 

W. Powers Jr., 63, a long- a fiew yeaia. 
time postal employee, was He is survived by his 

celebrated Wednesday at St. wife of 43 years, Qiarlotte 

Ann's Church in WoUaston. (Wright) Powers of Wol- 

Mr. Powers died July 10 Jaston; four sons, John 

at Quincy Hospital. "Michael" Powers III of 

He worked for the postal Westwood, Gregory Powers Quincy. 

service for 37 years. He of Wollaston, Thomas Pow- Mr. Wahlberg died July 

began as a letter carrier and ers and Jeff^ery Powers, both 2 at Boston Medical Center, 

rose to several positions, of Quincy; three daughters, Boston. 



A funeral Mass for Allen 
Joseph Wahlberg, Sr., 62, of 
Quincy, an electrician and 
U.S. Air Force veteran of 
the Korean War, was cele- 
brated July 7 in Sacred 
Heart Church, North 



including manager of logis- 
tics and transportation, di- 
rector of mail processing 
operations, tour superinten- 
dent at the South Postal An- 
nex, manager of the Dor- 
chester Center and Grove 
Hall post offices, and super- 
visor of mails and delivery. 

He was also employed as 
an X-ray technician and as a *-*metery. 
traction therapist in the Funeral arrangements 
emergency unit of the for- were by Hamel, Wickens 
mer Boston City Hospital, and Troupe Funeral Home, 
He worked at the hospital, 26 Adams St. 
in addition to the postal 
service, for nearly 20 years. 

Bom and raised in Dor- 
chester, Mr. Powers earned 



Cindy Mignosa of Quincy, 
Karen Hennessy of Wol- 
laston and Linda Nickerson 
of Plymouth; two sisters, 
Joan Keams of Hull and 
Dorothy Buchanan of 
Fairhope, Ala.; and 19 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Dorchester before 



William J. Wahlberg and 
Madeline Wahlberg of 
Whitman, Thomas C. 
Wahlberg and Arlene 
Wahlberg of Dedham and 
John K. Wahlberg and 
Laura. Wahlberg of Frank- 
lin; a daughter and son-in- 
law, Sharon M. Broadbent 
and Robert Broadbent of 
Quincy; four brothers, Rob- 
ert Wahlberg of California, 
Arthur Wahlberg of Quincy, 



Char- 



moving to Quincy 29 years Donald Wahlberg of Dor- 

chester and Alfred 
Wahlberg of North Caro- 
lina; two sisters, Thelma 
Moser of Holbrook and 
Donna Black of Dorchester; 



Donation's may be made 
to the Joslin Diabetes Cen- 
ter, 1 Joslin Place, Boston, 
02215, or to the American 
a degree in accounting from Heart Association, 20 Speen 
Bentley College after serv- St., Framingham, 01701. 



ago. He attended 
lestown High School. 

He worked as an electri- 
cian for 25 years at Bethle- 
hem Steel, General Dy-, 

namics, Boston Navy Yard and 10 grandchildren, Jason, 
and the Railroad. 

Mr. Wahlberg served in 
the U.S. Air Force from 
1955 to 1963. 

He was a member of 
IBEW 791 (Intemational 
Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers) and a member of 
the North Shore Art Asso- 
ciation and Milton Art As- 
sociation. 

Husband of Catherine E. 



Tracy, Kristi, Michelle, 
Meredith, Heather, Julie, 
Brian, Alyson and Daniel. 

He was also the son of 
the late Axel S. Wahlberg 
and Madeluie M. (Bradley) 
Wahlberg and brother of the 
late Paul Wahlberg. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cei^etery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 



A funeral Mass for Ed- 
mund J. Guinto, Sr., 59, of 
Quincy, was celebrated July 
6 in St. John the Baptist 
Church, Quincy Center. 

Mr. Guinto died July 1 
at home after a long 
illness. 

He was a forklift 
operator for many years 
and was recently retired. 

He lived in South 
Boston for 28 years and in 
Quincy for one year. 

Mr. Guinto was bom in 
Roxbury and attended 
schools there. 

Husband of the late Ann 
M. (Fraser) Guinto, he is 
survived by five sons, 
Edmund J. Guinto Jr., of 



Quincy, John Guinto of 
Winchendon, Joseph 
Guinto of Quincy, Paul 
Guinto of Hull and Peter 
Guinto of Easton; a 
daughter, Theresa Guinto 
of Boston; a brother, 
Robert C. Guinto of 
Somerville; nine 

grandchildren and many 
nephews and nieces. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 
Independence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to Old Colony Hospice, 14 
Paige Terrace, Stoughton 
02072 



Rita T. Cronin, 84 

Homemaker 



Ferdinand Polimeno, 85 

Retired Self-Employed Painter 



A funeral service for 
Ferdinand "Fred" Polimeno, 
85, of Quincy, formerly of 
South Boston, a retired self- 
employed painter and a di- 
rector of Boston Aid to the 
Blind in West Roxbury, was 
held July 10 at Keohane 
Funeral Home. 785 Han- 
cock St. 

Mr. Polimeno died July 8 
at Quincy Rehabilitation 
and Nursing Center. 

Mr. Polimeno retired in 
1976. He was a member of 
the Painters and Decorators 
Association of America. 

He was a member of the 
Images Program and 



frve sons and daughters-in- 
laws, Allen J. Wahlberg, Jr., 
and Kathy Wahlberg of 
past member of Quincy Plymouth; Michael C. 



(Baggs), he is survived by were made by the Keohane 

Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 



Summerfest Program. 

Bom in Boston, he lived 
in South Boston before 
moving to Quincy 23 years 
ago. 

Mr. Polimeno is survived 
by his wife, Grace M. 



Wahlberg and Donna 



to the American Heart As- 
sociation, 20 Speen St., 



Wahlberg of Hubbardston, Framingham, MA 01701. 

Dorothy McCallum-Duffy, 70 

Clerk For Boston Shoe Company 



A funeral Mass for Do- 



(DiMaggio) Polimeno; a son rothy (Peach) McCallum- 
and daughter-in-law, Ste- Duffy, 70, of Quincy, a 



phen P. and Gerry Polimeno 
of Quincy; and many neph- 
ews and nieces. 

Burial was in Holy Cross 
Cemetery, Maiden. 



clerk for the Morton Shoe 
Co. in Boston, was cele- 
brated July 6 in St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

Mrs. McCallum-Duffy 



Quincy and Joseph W. 
McCallum of Easton; three 
daughters, Ann Mellor of 
Quincy, Mary Moores of 
Milford and Diane McNealy 
of Deny, N.H.; three broth- 
ers, Stanley Peach of All- 
ston, James Peach of 



A funeral Mass for Rita 
T. (Callahan) Cronin, 84, of 
West Quincy, a homemaker, 
was celebrated July 9 at St. 
Mary's Church in West 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Cronin died July 5 
at Elihu White Nursing and 
Rehabilitation Center in 
Braintree. 

She was a past president 
and member of the St. 

Mary's Guild and St. 
Mary's Ladies Sodality. 

She was born and edu- 
cated in East Boston. Mrs. 
Cronin lived in Winthrop 
before moving to West 
Quincy in 1946. 



Wife of the late Paul 
Cronin, she is survived by 
two sons, Paul Cronin of 
Easton and Justin Cronin of 
Avon; a daughter, Linda 
Cronin of Quincy; two sis- 
ters, Loretta Shields and 
Eleanor Magee, both of 
Winthrop; and four grand- 
children. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 362 
Copeland St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Jennifer Creed Fun, 
c/o Justin Cronin, 33 N. 
Main St., Avon, MA 02111. 



Patricia A. Kinsella 

Retired Respiratory Therapist 



Donations may be made pital. 
to Boston Aid to the Blind, She was a clerk for the 



died July 1 at Quincy Hos- Quincy and Richard Peach 

of Aubumdale; a sister, Jane 
Ryan of Stoughton; 18 



1980 Centre St., West Rox- 



Beechwood in Quincy and a bury 02132. 

Carol A. Collins, 59 

Retired Villa Rosa Waitress 



A funeral Mass for Carol 
A. (Hogan) Collins, 59, of 
Quincy, a retired waitress at 
the Villa Rosa restaurant. 



lived in Quincy for 33 years. 

She is survived by her 

husband, Gerard A. Collins; 

two sons, Glenn Collins of 



was celebrated Wednesday Quincy and Jay Collins of 
at St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Collins died at 



Morton Shoe Co. in Boston 
for 15 years. 

Bom in Watertown, she 
had lived in Dorchester be- 
fore moving to Quincy nine 
years ago. 

She was active in the 
Martenson St. Association 
with making crafts. 

Wife of the late Wilbert 
J. McCallum and John J. 



grandchildren and 6 great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Jo- 
seph's Cemetery, West 
Roxbufy. 

■ 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 Han- 
cock St., North Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to Martenson St. Associa- 
tion, c/o Helen McDonald, 



South Boston; a daughter, Duffy, she is survived by 

mi5. ^uuius «...u ai Sandra Verhault of Quincy; three sons, James F. „ .^„^„ «,, ., .r^ 

home July 10 after a brief two sisters, Joan Hogan and McCallum of Weymouth, "^^ .^^!?m\'ko 

Marie Constantino, both of William J. McCallum of Qumcy, MA 02169. 



South Boston; and three 
grandchildren. She was also 
the mother of the late Dyan 
Collins. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



illness. 

She worked as a waitress 
at the Villa Rosa for 15 
years before retiring in 
1986. 

She enjoyed crafts and 
music, especially playing Cemetery, 
the organ. Funeral arrangements 

Bom in Boston and edu- were by Lydon Funeral 
cated in South Boston, she Home, 644 Hancock St. 

William O. Burrows, 66 

Retired Elevator Mechanic 



Louise E. Sullivan, 97 

Bargain Center Clerk 

A funeral Mass for Wife of the late William 

Louise E. (Trainor) Sulli- H. Sullivan, she is survived 

van, 97, of Quincy, a former by four sons, William H. 

clerk at the Bargain Center Sullivan of Pawtucket, R.L; 



A funeral Mass for Patri- 
cia A. (Grafton) Kinsella, of 
Quincy, a retired respiratory 
therapist at the former Bos- 
ton City Hospital, was cele- 
brated July 8 at Gate of 
Heaven Church, South 
Boston. 

Mrs. Kinsella died July 
4. 

She volunteered in the 
emergency room at Quincy 
Hospital. 

Mrs. Kinsella was a for- 
mer South Boston resident. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Joseph T. Kin- 
sella; a daughter, Kathleen 
Kinsella of Texas; two 
brothers, Richard Kinsella 
of Florida and Walter Kin- 



sella of Maine; five sisters, 
Catherine Kinsherf of 
Braintree, Mildred Rosa of 

Florida, Florence Lyons of 
South Boston, Loretta 
Spring of Taunton and 
Marie Mayo of South Bos- 
ton; and several nieces and 
nephews. 

She was a mother of the 
late William T. Kinsella and 
Joseph T. Kinsella Jr. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by O'Brien Funeral 
Home. 

Donations may be made 
to American Diabetes Asso- 
ciation, 40 Speen St., 
Framingham 01701. 



and employee at Papa 
Gino's Restaurant in Wol- 
laston, was celebrated July 6 
in St. Ann's Church. 



Paul P. Sullivan of Tbr- 
rence, CA; John J. Sullivan 
of Hull; and Richard P. Sul- 
livan of Quincy; a daughter. 



Funeral services for Wil- 
liam O. Burrows, 66, of 
Quincy, a retired elevator 
mechanic, were held July 7 
at the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 333 Hancock St., 
North Quincy. 

Mr. Burrows died July 2 
at his home. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Quincy all of his 
life. He was employed by 
Delta Elevator in Brighton 
until his retirement in 
1995. 

He was a Navy veteran. 

He was a member of 



the lUEC Local 4. 

Husband of the late 
Doris (Cushing), he is 
survived by his wife, 
Margaret (Cordani) a son, 
Richard W. Burrows; a 
daughter, Dianne Watts, 
both of Duxbury; a brother, 
Thomas Burrows; a sister, 
Claire Sherman, both of 
Marstons Mills; and three 
grandchildren. 

Cremation will follow 
the service. 

Donations may be made 
to the Veterans Homeless 
Shelter, 17 Court St., 
Boston, MA 02108 



Mrs. Sullivan died July 1 Margaret E. DeLuca of 
at Life Care Center, Rayn- Taunton; 22 grandchildren, 



ham 

Bom in Boston, she had 
lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 42 years 
ago. 

She was a clerk at the 
Bargain Center where she Cemetery, Quincy 
was employed for 17 years. 
She also worked as a clerk 
at Filene's in Boston and 
Daggett's Chocolates in 
Cambridge. 

At the age of 85, she ap- 
plied for a part-time job at 
Papa Gino's restaurant in 
Wollaston where she 
worked until she was 90. 



37 great-grandchildren and 
four great-great- 
grandchildren. 

She was also the mother 
of the late Barbara L. Gu^st. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to Hospice of the South 
Shore, 100 Baystate Dr., 
P.O. Box 9060, Braintree, 
MA 02184. 




WET^ FIGHTING FGR 
NOURLIFE 

American Heart 
Association 







Page28 Tli« Quinoy Sun Thanday, July 15« 1999 






1354 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
7709271 Fax:770-9272 
breakfast Served 6am-Tlam 
Homemade Soups, Salads & Deseerte 
Gourmet Coffees 
Pellcious Ice Cream & Frozen Yogurts 
CATERING AVAILABLE 
HOURS: Moru%-Frklac/ 6am-4pm 





oA 



LUNCH DINNER 

Tuesday • Friday Tucaday • Sunday 

Entrcct $6.95 - $9.95 Eariy Dinner SpccUb $9.9S • $ 1 2.95 

Sunday Brunch 11:00^ 2:00 
FuacUoo FacUitin Aecommodating 20-2Q0 

WcJJinyi • Rehearsal * Dinners • Social Gathering: 
* UriJitl Shoivcrs * l-.mjaijcmcnl Parties 



1/0 



.'W* 


SHIRETOWN FORD 

147 Samoset St/Rt 44 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Qualitirj^ 

1-800-649-9246 
(508)746-3400 


"0-*%' . 


■■«► 


VINNT SUAHNIUI 

Parts, Service, 


^^:^:^^'^^M 


Body Shop Director 


- 



KING CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 


39 Poseidon's 


1 Dickensian 


place 
40 Pump up 


nomde 


plume 


thevdume 


4 Naviga- 


41 A Brady 


tor's stack 


sister 


8 Pawn 


45 98-pound 


12 Where 


weakling 


aniniois 


48 Despise, 


worn 


with "on" 


13 Bum 


50 On 


soother 


51 Sultry 


14 CXitaiio 


summer 


neighbor 


52 A welcome 


IS Recorded 


sight? 


17 Word 


53 Last 


screamed 


several 


byJeny 


notes 


Lewis 


54 Antelope's 


mimics 


playmate 


18 Redheads' 


55 Donkey 


secrets? 


DOWN 


19 The whole 


IThisand 


enchilada 


that 


21 Early hrs. 


2Reed 


22 Began 


insmiment 


studying 


3 National 


26ra!tf 

29 TV network 


paikin 
Utah 


30 Hockey's 


41Yans- 


Tikkanen 


Pyrenean 


31Ufemme 


senora 


32 Roofer's 


5 At -for 


need 


words 


33 Pay 


6 •*Bam!" 


attention 


7 Strom 


34 IVpe units 


Thur- 


33 Pantheon 


mond, e.g. 


figure 


8 Conversa- 


36 Covenants 


tion piece? 


37 Consult 


9 "...good 


Webster's 


witch- 



bad witch?' 

10 Spanish 
literary hero 

11 Indispens- 
able 

16 Jack 

20 Rocket fiiel 

23 Sharp 

24 Previously 
owned 

25TU>lets 

26 Scoundrel 

27 "Sesame 
Street" 
denizen 

28 Addition- 
aUy 

29 Rubik's 
Cube. e.g. 

32Fen 
33 Stock up 

35 Sticky stuff 

36 Lab vessel 
38FhiBeta- 
39 1995 

William 

Hurt movie 
42-Be- 

itnioes 
43'Whcn- 

17..." 

44 Picnic 
hamperers 

45 Service- 
woman of 
yat 

46 "Who am 
-judacr 

47S^lish.in 

the '60s 
49Hamenco 

cheer 



TRIVIA TErT 

by Aaron E. Tucker 



Your Horoscope 
Natasha 




45 


«6 


47 




U 








5i 









AN/ Wn/ TO CROirWORD 



nna nnnn orFMH 
naa Mnnn n^na 
□■^'Kr-Trar-iHEi nuiL: 

oiiHnai] niTia 

□na noia?:!^ 
nFTin:-:D fihh uziu 
[•][]uii] nciu nukin 
nun n:.iu nMoaai 

loarj [jk-jncrnm 

Miirin PiKiia nn:^ 
nnKci unun nwii 



1. Cao you name wiut 
city md tttis tegendary 
itage and loeeo acteu 
Lauren Bacli was bora in? 

2. What ia the Mate capi- 
tal of Texas? 

3. Who wu the original 
host of *t:Uuidid Camera" on 
television in 19487 

4. Whose first nationwide 
hit was "Material GirT? 

5. Can you name Bay 
City, Michigan's most 
famous native to date? 

6. Can you name the first 
Ameikan newspaper that 
printed "Little Orphan 
Annie" in 19247 

7. Who wu Walter 



CroaUte's fbst live guest 
during the CBS news show 
on Sepmnber 2, 1963? 

8. Can you name all four 
original "Mookees" in 
1966? 




ipiiDssN lanqsfN P"* 'nvof 
piA«a 'VOX ^3*3^ '«»ioa 
/anipm -g tXpanuax J ui|Of 
inapftajj 7, Ismsn ^IPKI 
VOA *»N 5 tMniopuw > 
tioad oaiiv tupsRV 'Z :AD 
^A i*»ti '"»i8 «ll *I 



HOCUS FCK US 



BY 
NENRY BOLTINOFF 




Find alitaM aix dNlMMoas m 




'uozpO(( uo •! ivog '0 adMit ou sAtt^ muni} ui(«8 'S 
-pappa MMQ tVM fwoq jaifM > 'mpatanui ism utN *€ 
jao t o j Jtu ai iai|uti8 'Z 'too^aiaq ■! foe '\ :M3u«M||ia 



CRlTICr CORNER 



AUSTIN POWERS: 
THE SPY WHO 
SHAGGED ME -He's b«- 

ft-a-Kk! Mike Mytrs. die 
concdic genius bdiind diit 
sequel, reprises his role as 
the James Bood-like char- 
acter of Austin Powen. 

This time, Poweis has 
traveled back in tine 10 the 
psychedelic '60», con^lete 
with outiaadish ckMhes, 
hair, etc. If s a time of "fut 
love," and Powen is cer- 
tainly enjoying thati 

Dr. Evil (Myers) has 
stolen Aastia's Iftido ia an 
effort to thwart the super- 
ipy from isierfering with 
Evil's piaaa for woild dom- 
inance. Joinins Fowen ia 
hte journey back 10 Slop dm 
is dw winsmne Felicity 
ShagweO (Haatihar 

Grafeam), a CIA agent Dr. 
Evil's able partner-fai-crime 
ia Fnu Faibissiaa (Mmtj 
StarUng), a dnew if evar 
dierewasone. 

Added 10 Myen'diveisi- 
Qr of rolm is the 500-poand 
Fat Bastard. He's a nrie. 



crude Scotsman m ruU uu 
pegaUa. Believe me, dw ftt 
jokes abound. At limes, diis 
borders on overkill, but 
you'll find younelf laugh- 
ing akmg anyway. 

Besides being a parody 
of die '60s-«ra Bond fibm, 
die flick also takes some 
nice comedic swipes at our 
own popular cuUure, widi 
eveiydiing from Starbucks, 
•The Jerry Springv Show." 
and "Star Wan" taking big 
hitt. The Springer ep^ode 
ia puticular is hilarious. 
Scon Evil (Seth Green) is 
reunited witfi his dad. Dr. 
Evil. Picdictably. die two 
wind up lossiBg chain and 
bleeping with die best (7) of 
Springer's guests, real and 
imagmed. 

All hi all, you really have 
10 pupead your iMelkct 10 
enjoy diis one. It's notfaiag 
more dian a sophomoric 
romp. However, thanks to 
the huge talents of MHrr 
Mycn himself, it works. 
Rated FG- 13. h's not for dM 
younger kkhhes. 



ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) Check your 
reflexes heifstt you venture 
out to face die world. The 
obstacles in your path can 
(»ly be maneuvered by a 
shrewd and experienced 
navigator. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Make sure your 
foundations are sturdy 
before you move oo to more 
k>fty goals. Be prepared to 
answer intelligent ques- 
tions. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) If you put your 
evidence and your research 
on the table, your product 
may sell itself. If it doesn't, 
know when and where 10 
apply pressure. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) Changes made 
slowly and steadily tend to 
last longer than changes 
made in haste. Keep diis 
fact in mind as you try to 
change your life. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) Everyvme vies for a few 
minutes of your time. It is a 
valuable commodiQr, but 
it's only as golden as the 
actions of the owner. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Sometimes 
an excess of information 
makes it impossible to 
reach conclusions or deci- 
sions. Seek a second or 
third opinion if it will make 
your burden easier. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October Z2) Everything and 
everyone is yours for the 
taking at this time. Because 
of this fact, you must decide 
carefully what - and whom 
- you need 10 pursue. 

SCORPIO (October 23 
to November 21) Dollar 
signs and question marks 
pop up everywhere, dis- 
tracting you amd obscuring 
your vision. Although your 
net worth is important, do 
not let it become your sole 
focus. 




lUS 

(November 22 10 December 
21) If you have been wait- 
ing 10 cooiiont someone, set 
up a meeting with them 
now. You are ready to 
defend yourself without 
starting a fight 

CAPRICORN 
(December 22 10 January 
19) C3iange your pace or 
your style in order to match 
every(Mie else. Originality is 
usually an asset, but at diis 
time, it couU hinder your 
progress. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 18) You are 
more than ever an object of 
beauty and enjoyment You 
make your surronndings 
more ccMnfortable and luxu- 
rious simply by being pn- 
sent 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Does your body 
seem to be flawed, weak 
and pained? Recognize that 
a serious bout of hypochon- 
dria may be die most major 
thing you're suffering from. 

YOU BORN THIS 
WEEK: The progression 
and improvement of 
humanity is a task to which 
you are quite willing to ded- 
icate much of your life. 
Change, you believe, is 
absolutely necessary and 
should not be feared. 
Although your explorer's 
attitude makes some people 
nervous, they can't deny 
that you have their best 
interests in mind. 

O 1999 Kii« Feamres Synd.. tac. 




For home subscription, 

please call 

(617) 471-3100 



Tfcf»ifaiy.J«lyl5,lf»» Tb^Qoincy 



29 



Sheets To Host Mayors, 
Business Conference 



By MARILYN JACKSON 

Several Canadian busi- 
nesses have expressed inter- 
est in attending the 1999 
annual conference of the 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
Atlantic Canada Associa- 
tion, to be h(»ted by Mayor 
James Sheets. 

Tm really surprised at 
the numbers," said Helen 
Murphy of the mayor's 
staff, who is working with 
Rhonda Merrill, director of 
tourism and special events, 
coordinating the three-day 
program, which begins Aug. 
4. 

Murphy said businesses 
from Newfoundland, Nova 
Scotia, New Brunswick, 
Prince Edward Island and 
Labrador, as well as several 
mayors from southeastern 
Massachusetts are expected 
to attend. 

In the past, mayors' con- 
ferences have been held in 
Quincy, but the program 
consisted of meetings in the 
morning, followed by a 
luncheon, she said. 

Registration at the 
Adams Inn begins Wednes- 
day, Aug. 4, ami the Quincy 
Partnership will hold a wel- 
coming reception and, by 
invitation, a clambake and 
an evening of entertainment. 
The next day's program 
begins with a mayor's wel- 
come and a continental 
breakfast at the Landing at 



the Adams Inn. 

Businessman Edward 
Keohane, who is a member 
of the Quincy Partnership 
and Quincy 2000, will host 
a trolley tour for attendees, 
pointing out the growth and 
history of Quincy. Stops 
will include a visit to the 
Quarry Hills golf course 
which is under develop- 
ment, Marina Bay and a 

couple of other businesses 
in the city. 

There's so much to show 
off, said Murphy, noting 
that many nationally and 
internationally known busi- 
nesses, like Howard John- 
son Company and Dunkin' 
Donuts, started in Quincy. 

And, Quincy's historical 
heritage as the City of 
Presidents is an attraction as 
well. 

Quincy developer Peter 
O'Connell will be the key- 
note speaker at the luncheon 
Aug. 5, to be held at the 
Neighborhood Gub. He will 
discuss "Government and 
Business Working To- 
gether." 

That evening an interna- 
tional business session will 
be held, featuring Canadian 
Consul General Mary 
Clancy, at Hot Water- 
Marina Bay. This event is 
by invitation also, due to 
limited space. Murphy said. 
Richard Terrazas, president 
of the New England-Canada 



'Business Council, will de- 
liver opening remarics. 

On Aug. 6, Dr. Anthony 
Cicerone, director of Cana- 
dian studies at Bridgewater 
State College, will summa- 
rize the discussions of the 
previous meetings. Before 
adjourning, planning for the 
Year 2000 conference will 
begin. 

Afterwards, a business- 
to-business table top ex- 
change of information will 
be held at the Tent at Adams 
Inn, hosted by the Quincy 
2000 Corporation and the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Registration fees are $65 
for delegates and $35 for 
guests; checks should be 
made payable to the City of 
Quincy — SEMACA Con- 
ference and mailed to the 
Mayor's Office, City of 

Quincy, 1305 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

Accommodations at the 
Adams Inn, which is a Best 
Western facility, are avail- 
able at a discount. Call 1- 
800-368-4012 or 1-617-328- 
1500 for further informa- 
tion. 

For further information 
about the conference, call 
Dr. Anthony Cicerone, ex- 
ecutive director, SEMACA, 
at 1-508-697-1716, ext. 
2288, or e-mail him at 
cicerone@bridgew.edu. 



Keating, Police Bring 
Quincy Point Together 



Dozens of leaders and 
members of the Quincy 
Point neighborhood recently 
turned out to support the 
Islamic Center of New 
England after the religious 
center recently experienced 
problems with a small hand- 
ful of youngsters in the 
neighborhood. 

District Attorney Bill 
Keating, with the co- 
sponsorship of Quincy Po- 
lice Chief Thomas Frane 
and city government, 
brought together about three 
dozen members of the 
Quincy Point Community, 
police and city officials and 
members of the Islamic 
Center to talk through the 
recent incidents. 

The meeting brought 
members of the Islamic 
Center together with neigh- 
bors, local high school stu- 
dents. It also included a 



number of Quincy Point 
senior citizens - neighbors 
who recognize that the 
neighborhood's present 
growing pains are no differ- 
ent than the ones they or 
their Irish, Jewish, or Italian 
parents felt fifty years ago. 
"Growing pains are natu- 



Protestant and Catholic 
churches. 

City Councilors Paul 
Harold and Dan Raymondi 
attended, as did the Islamic 
Center's Imam Talal Eid 
and several members of his 
congregation. 

"This is not a substitution 



ral for any neighborhood for prosecuting those who 

that is changing," Keating commit crimes, but it may 

said following the meeting, well accomplish more," said 

"Bringing together people Keating, who organized the 

of all ages to make inter- event after joining the 

generational connections in Quincy Police investigation 

a constructive atmosphere of the problems at the Is- 

like this, where they can talk lamic Center. 




PROTECTING THE PUBLIC, the Quincy Police Department Aas added to its marine 
patrol a Kawasaki 1100 Jet SM, donated by South Shore ^«l>tor Sports of Frankiio Street 
Showing off the new equipment are, in the foreground Officers James Silcox and Robert 
Gillan, and in the back, Capt Donald Riley, conunandcr of the unit, and Gray Shunatc, a 
sales representative ofSiHith Shore Motor SpMls. 

(Quincy Sun PhotolR(^rt Noble) 

Jet Ski Donated 
To Police Marine Unit 



Following in the wake of 
the State Police's marine 
unit, the Quincy police de- 
partment has added a fully 
equipped Jet Ski to its ma- 
rine unit which also includes 
two patrol boats. 

The patrol boats are ca- 
pable of responding to deep 
water incidents, but the Jet 
Ski can respond rapidly to 
incidents in shallow water 
as well as patrol environ- 
mentally sensitive marshy 
areas. 



The Jet Ski includes first 
responder emergency medi- 
cal equipment. 

Mark Brewster of South 
Shoce Motor Sports at 94 
Franklin St., offered to as- 
sist the police department's 
marine unit and arranged for 
Kawasaki Motors of Amer- 
ica to loan a Kawasaki 1100 
Jet Ski on an aimual basis. 

Considering the mobility 
of a Jet Ski, the police de- 
partment plans to have the 
Jet Ski on station for all 



marine events such as the 
Quincy Bay Race Week in 
August. 

Capt. Donald J. Riley is 
the commanding officer of 
the marine unit. Others as- 
signed to the marine patrol 
include Lt. James McNeil 
and Sgt. Dan Kennedy. 

The police said the new 
piece of equipment would 
be invaluable, since Quincy 
has 27 miles of coastline, 
ranging from deep-draft 
shipping lanes to tidal mud 
flats. 



12 QHS, NQHS Juniors 
Attend Legion Boys State 



Twelve Quincy and 
North Quincy High School 
juniors recently attended the 
American Legion Boys 
State program at Stonehill 
College in North Easton. 

Past State Commander 
Robeft Leo Eng of Quincy 
Legion Post, Norfolk 
County Boys State chairman 
said the 12 were among 420 



selected from high schools 
throughout the state. 

Selected from Quincy 
High School were: 

Patrick A. Collins, Mi- 
chael M. Tran and Thank 
Au, sponsored by Quincy 
Legion Post; Engie Zeng 
and Robert Fensterman, 
sponsored by Houghs Neck 
Legion Post. 



Selected from North 
Quincy High School: 

Joseph T. O'Connell, 
Eric A. Foley, Daniel M. 
Dewey, Stephen Minukas 
and Christian W. Oster, 
sponsored by Quincy Le- 
gion Post; Daniel 
McDonagh and Philip Cai, 
sponsored by Wollaston 
Legion Post. 



and listen to each other, will 
hopefully drown out the 
voices of those few who 
don't understand, or who 
feel threatened by it." 
In addition to the Islamic 



The June 22 meeting will 
be the first of many meet- 
ings of this group. Neigh- 
borhood members showed 
overwhelming support to 
make this a working group 



Center, Quincy Point draws to promote understanding 

cultural diversity from a and community in Quincy 

Buddhist temple, a Jewish Point, 
synagogue and numerous 



Foster Grandparents Needed 

which can help build up a week. Also, foster grand- 
good relationship between parents enjoy the children 
seniors and children at day and can receive a non- 
care centers or Head Start taxable stipend as w^ as a 
programs and, when school fee to cover transportation 
resumes, in the classroom, costs, 
according to Blackman. 

Volunteers must be 55 
years of age or over and be 
able to commit to 20 hours a 



Volunteers are needed 
for the ABCD Foster Grand- 
parent Program which is 
expanding into Quincy, ac- 
cording to Ruth Blackman. 

The foster grandparent 
project is a program of Ac- 
tion for Boston Community 
Development Inc. 

This is a great program 



For more information or 
to apply, call Linda Yip at 
617-357-6000, ext. 341 or 
Ruth Blackman at ext. 340. 



Michelle Young Awarded Child Care Credential 



Michelle Young of 
Quincy has been awarded a 
Child Development Associ- 
ate (CDA) Credential in 



recognition of outstanding 
work with young children. 

The credential was 
awarded by the Council for 
Early Childhood Profes- 



sional Recognition in 
Washington, D.C., which 
represents the eariy child- 
hood profession. 



ATTENTION [ 

I Quincy Sun Mail Subscribers ! 





BREAKFAST 

7 days a week 

all day 



Early American Restaurant 

Since 1988 
1054 Hancock Street, Quincy • 328-8225 

Open Daily at 7am 
HOUSE SPECIALTY • Our Famous Homemade Corned Beef Hash 



I If you are moving, please inform us of your new address at least 
I two weeks before. The Post Office will not forward your copy of The 
I Sun. 

I To prevent delivery of your copy from being interrupted, please^fill 
out the for m below or notify us by telephone (6 1 7) 47 1 -3 1 00. 



Name 



I 
I 
I 

I Street 

I City or Town 
I State 

I 
I 
I 



PRESENT ADDRESS 



NEW ADDRESS («ffKtiv« 

Name 

Street 



) 



ZIP Code 



City or Town 
State 



ZIP Code 



Send to The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 . 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



^s- 



Page 30 Tttm QuixMy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1999 



I UEQALNOTiCCS | | LEOAL MOncaT 



] 



, 



CX)MMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1532EP 
Estate of JOHN J. 

BURKE, III 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DOROTHY 
M. GREENE of MILTON In 
the County of NORFOLK be 
ap»»ointed executor, named 
in the wm without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to ob)«ct to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file e written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
RulelGA. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedhafn this day 6/29/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1585EP 

Estate of SIDNEY SHAMAI 

KURTZMAN 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that MIRIAM 
KURTZMAN of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court' at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to ttie 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day 7/1/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1589EP 

Estate of ESTHER N. 

JOHNSON 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DORIS E. 
O'KEEFE of HINGHAM In 
the County of PLYMOUTH 
be appointed executrix, 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day 7/1/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1625EP 

Estate of INEZ M. SMITH 

AKA INEZ J. SMITH 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that KEVIN B. 

SMITH of HINGHAM In the 

County of PLYMOUTH be 

appointed executor, named 

in the will without surety on 

the bond. 

If you desire to object to 

the allowance of said 

petition, ycu or your attorney 

must file a written 

appearance in said Court at 

Dedham on or before ten 

o'clock in the forenoon on 

August 18, 1999. 

In addition you should file 

a written statement of 

objections to the petition, 

giving the specific grounds 

therefore, within thirty (30) 

days after the return day (or 

such other time as the Court, 

on motion with notice to the 

petitioner, may allow) in 

accordance with Probate 

Rule16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 

Kopelman, Esquire, First 

Justice of said Court at 

Dedham this day 7/6/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 




We need 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart fis 
Association.^^ 


you. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk DiviskKi 

Docket 99P1666A0 

Estate of MARGARET 

JEAN NICOLLE WALKER 

AKA JEAN WALKER 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that ALAN H. CONWAY of 

SHARON In the County of 

NORFOLK be appointed 

administrator of said estate 

with personal surety on the 

bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appeevance in sakl Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 18, 1999. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day 7/9/1999. 

THOMAS PATRWK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 96P0810E1 
Notice Of Fiduciary's 

Account 
To the Attorney General of 
the Commonwealth of 
MassachusAtts and to all 
persons interested in the 
estate of Marion E. 
Cameron, late of Quincy, in 
the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. R 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) Sarah J. Vassil 
and Deborah Milne as Co- 
Executors (the fiduciary) of 
said estate has been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the fourth day of 
August, 1 999, the return day 
of this citatran. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Ov. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this 23rd day of 
June, 1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/15/99 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Residents Complete Red Cross Training Course 



Two Quincy residents, 
Lucia McGrath and Mag- 
dalene Njoroge recently 
completed an American Red 
Cross job skills training 
program. 

The four-week Nurse 
Assistant and Human Health 
Aide Training course is nec- 



T 



UK2AL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk, ss. 

Docket 98P3133EP 

To ail persons interested 
in the estate of Arthur W. 
Wright, late of Quincy, in sakl 
County, deceased, testate. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell private sale- 
certain real estate of said 
deceased. whk:h is situated 
in Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, in accordance with 
the offer set out in said 
petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'dkxk in 
the forenoon on August 4, 
1 9999, ttie return day of this 
citation. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
sixth day of July 1999. 

THOMAS PATRWK HUGHES 
REGISTER 

7/15/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 96P0600E1 
Notice Of Fiduciary's 

Account 
To all persons interested 
in the estate of Katharine H. 
McLeod, late of Quincy in 
the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) Richard G. Stiles 
as Executors (the fiduciary) 
of said estate has been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to presen/e 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the eleventh day of 
August, 1999, the return day 
of this citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attomey 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesakj, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
nnotkMi may order a written 
statement of each such item 
togetfier with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to 136 served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this first day of July, 
1999. 

THOMAS PATRK:K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/15/99 



essary to work in a health 
care field such as a nurse 
assistant or home health 
aide. 

Day or evening classes 
are available in Boston, 
Framingham, Quincy and 
Peabody. Cost for the 100- 
hour course is $515. Gradu- 
ates receive both Red Cross 
Nurse Assistant and Home 
Health Aide certificate upon 
completion of course re- 
quirements. 



Graduates will be sched- 
uled for the Nurse Aide 

State Exam, and are also 
provided with references 
with the Red Cross, which 
will assist in job searches 
and placements. 

To register, call the 
American Red Cross of 
Massachusetts Bay Cus- 
tomer Call Center at (617) 
375-0700, ext. 221, 235, or 
272. 



Hill & Partners Receives 
Exhibitor Excellence Award 



Hill & Partners, Inc. 
based in Quincy received an 
"Exhibitor Excellence 
Award" at the Supercomm 
*99 show held recently in 
Atlanta, GA for the General 
Datacomm exhibit. 

General Datacomm, a 
leader in the telecommuni- 
cations field, features tech- 
nical demonstrations and 
multimedia presentations in 
their exhibit. 

"Our challenge was to 
offer a design flexible 
enough to showcase a wide 
anay of products, but dis- 
tinctive enough to really 
make an impact." said Su- 
san Hill, president of Hill & 



Partners, Inc. 

Ed Tworkowski, mar- 
keting & trade show man- 
ager, added, **We met these 
challenging criteria and far 
exceeded everyone's ex- 
pectations." 

Located at 1354 Hancock 
St., Hill & Partners, Inc. 
provides three dimensional 
marketing solutions for a 
wide variety of clients and 
industries. The firm spe- 
cializes in both domestic 
and international trade show 
services including the de- 
sign and execution of ex- 
hibits, show services, pro- 
motions, event planning and 
print materials. 



mmm 



mm 



*v^ 






NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of QuirKy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-053 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999, at 7:1S pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council ChambBTS, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of KEVIN, BRIAN, 
AND ROGER BEARDE. FIRST SOUTHEAST REALTY 
TRUST for a VARIANCE to continue parking in the front 
setback and a Use Variance to change from the present use 
of a mason contractors office and yard to utilize the property 
as a tow k)t and auto/truck rental facility utilizing the existing 
building in violation of Title 1 7 as amended CHAPTER 1 7. 1 6 
(USE REGULATIONS). CHAPTER 17.20 (DIMENSIONAL 
REQUIREMENTS), CHAPTER 17.24 

(NONCONFORMANCE), CHAPTER 17.28 (LOCATION AND 
LAYOUT OF PARKING FACILITIES) on the premises 
numbered 552 SOUTH STREET. QUINCY POINT. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chainnan 

7/8, 7/15/99 



NOTICE or PUBUC hearhhi 



*p 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-052 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of RUSSELL & ALICE 
KNIGHT for a SPECIAL PERMIT/VARIANCE to construct 
an addition sized at approximately 12' x 20' in violation of 
Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.24 
(NONCONFORMANCE) on the premises numbered 217-221 
PARKE AVENUE & 98-102 DUNDEE ROAD, SQUANTUM. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chairman 
7/8.7/15/99 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARWO 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 99-051 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
JULY 27, 1999, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy. MA 02169. On the application of CVS BY 
MANDEVILLE SIGNS for a VARIANCE for signage in excess 
of the altowable number of signs in violation of Title 17 as 
amended CHAPTER 17.32 (SIGNS), on the premises 
numbered 321 QUINCY SHORE DRIVE, NORTH QUINCY. 

Edmund O'Leary, Chainnan 
7/8. 7/15/99 



j1^^ 



' T 



Thiiiiday,JiilyiS,l99» Tli^ QuJnoy gun Pagc31 



*-* 




nmnEHf 



A NEW HALL 

Elks LWM, off 254 Quarry St 

For Wedding, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCYELKS 

847-6149 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 
K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 
For InfommUon Pheae CaM 
797-0619 TT 



Th€ Bryan Room VFW 
24 Broad St, Quincy 

2 rooms available. 

Large room 4004 

small room 150 guests. 

1-80(M74-6234 



TF 



ARUBA 

Studio, 1 bdrm. & 2 bdrm. 
Fully equipped Aruba Beach 
Club or Casa del Mar. Many 
dates available. Call (617) 
479-4722 m 



Think Vacation 

Loon Mtn. Luxury Condo 

mountain and river View, 
sleeps 6, indoor & outdoor 
pools, close to outlet shopping 
and golf course, game room, 
steam room, laundry facilities, 
weekly rentals available for 
Aug. 617-479-1603 



SERVICES 



ExBCuUva Lawn Can 

Landscape Maintenance 

and Construction 
Spring and Fall Cleanups 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Brian (617) 268-1088 •» 



Attics Cleaned Out 

Okj Furniture & Trunks of 
Contents Etc. removed. 
Low senior citizen rates. 
Call Joe at 61 7-328-3844 



aos 



O'Mahony 
Claanlng Service 

Relax, let someone else do 
the work, t clean houses, 
apartments and offices. 
CallJackie 61 7-328-4662 jm 



Unlqu9 Weddfng 
OBremonles 

Civil, Religious, Interfaith 
Justice Lermre Birks 
(617)472-7454 
1-800-321-7481 jim 



SERVICES 



Sullivan TrBB Sarvicm 

Pruning. Removals, Stump 
Grinding. Mass Certified 
Aborist. 20 years exp. Crane 
Sen/ice. Firewood. Full ins. 
472-3595. w^• 



MSJR9$ldentlalServlC9$ 

Interior • Exterior painting, car- 
pentry, gutter services, 
yardworit, cleanouts & all re- 
lated handyman servk»s. Free 
estimates. Mike 328-8648 7« 



FRED'S HANDYiMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re^ 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 



M 



7/1S 



TOR^te 



' Hiwtjpwsi. 



86 Restaurant 

653 Southern Artery, 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Call Now 
(617) 786-9973 ^.2 



HELP WANTED 



STOP EARNING IMONEY 
FOR OTHER PEOPLE. 

Build your own financial future 
through Market America's 
"Unfranchise" the most power- 
ful business opportunity of the 
90's & beyond. For more infor- 
matkm call Robert & Danmara 
1-800-211-1202x02609 rm 



rANTEP 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, okl 
handtools, all trades (machin 
ist, pattern maker, watchmaker, 
etc.) shop lots. Also, antk^uar- 
ian books, frames, paintings, 
crocks, lanterns. Antiques in 
estate lots. 1 -61 7-558-3839 ir 



Aluminum Christmas 
trees any color or size. 

Also, revolving tree 
stands and rotating color 

wheels, will pay cash. 
781-848-9623 8/,9 



SALES 



Avon Products 

Start a home-based busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. 
Call toll free (888) 561- 
2866. 



am 



pwmmM. 



Counter/inside Sales 
TrucIc Driver 

Plumbing HVAC, Ben- 
efits Incl. Ins., 401 K. 
more, Exp. F/T Ellsworth 
Supply Co. 617-825 
5522 



t 



«2 



r»^; 



mNTM Homo IWMflll 



lem Of QppofiwMiies 
WoffcPTorPf 

Wed., July 28 
CotI for appt. & location 

Rllsto$35/visil 

to $27/lir. 

IPNs to $24/lir. 

CHIIAsto$12/iir. 

lyr. current exp. &CPRreq'(l 

888-691-4116 

wmi.kio^fminBi.om 



m 



PRAYER TO THE 

BLESSED VIRGIN 

(fiwr Known To Fall) 

"Oh, most beautilulllowerof ML Cannel, 
Fruitful vine, splendor of heaven, 
Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Im- 
nfiacdate VSq^, assist me in my neces- 
sity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help me and 
show me, herin you are my Mother. Oh, 
Hdy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of 
Heaven and Earlhl I humbly iMseech 
you from the tMltom d my heart to suc- 
cor me in this neoessly. (Make request). 
Tliere are none that can withstwd your 
power. Oh, show me herin that you are 
my Mother. Oh, Maiy, conceived with- 
out sin, pray for us who have recourse 
to thee (3X). Holy Mother, I piaca this 
cause in your hands (3X). Say this 
prayer 3 consecutive days. Ybu must 
be published and K wi be granted to 

you. BAM. 7/1S 



HHASONRY 

Steps - Walks - Walls - 
Patios - Brick - Block - 

Stone - Cement 
Registered & Insured 

781-254-1648 m 



Matit Tutor 

Experienced Math teacher will 
review skills/pr^jare forP.SAJ., 
S.A.T., highschool entrance. 
Give your child the added advan- 
tage Call Nancy (61 7) 479-5527 



SERVICES 



FLYNN 

SEALCOATING 

All Work Done 

by Brush 

No Sprays 

Quality Work 

Free Estimates 

617-471-6802 



W12 



MASTER 
ELECTRICIAN 

Lic#13685A 

Call Basil 
61 7-471 '9067 7,1s 



SERVICES 



A & T VACUUM 

• $19.96 OvtrhtulSptdal 
on any vacuum. 

• Sawing machina rapairing 

• VCR rapairing and ciaaning 
•Sharpaning 

(adaaora, icnivaa, ate.) 

• Grade XL Vacuuma $249 

• Badrolux w/powar noziia $199 

• Uaad vacuuiiM $45 & up 

27 B«alo St., Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



Bruce of All Trades 

Cement wort( (rnasonry), Larxl- 
scaping (cleanups, etc.). Paint- 
ing (int. & ext.), Capentry. Call 
for free estimates (781) 986- 
9668 or (781) 681-9983 r/is 



J.D. PETERS 
FENCE CONTRACTOR 

Wood, Chain Link 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Jim 617-773-3391 ^ 



7122 



Dormer 2nd Levels 

Free Estimates & 

Plan Sen/ice 

Frank Fournier 



7/15 



YARDSAtE 



YARD SALE 

Sat, July 17 S Sun, July 18 

lOam-Spm 
Housewares, Games & Cows 

42AllertonSt 
Quincy (Houghs Neck) m 



FOR SALE 



Handmade Sink Cabinet w/ 
sink, Formica Countertop 
4'x2'x3' Wall Cabinet 2 doors 
42'x12'x24'. All for 100.00. 
20x24 Gas Stove-exel cond. 
$75.00 617-479-3214 im 



Sav» Gas and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



M A J R—Mentlal Senrlcaa 

Interior • Exterior painting, 
carpentry, gutter services, 
yardwork, cleanouts & all re- 
lated handyman services. 
Free estimates. Mike 328- 
8648 



1(V7 



Photography 
by Sean 

Weddings, Engagements 
and Portraits 
SEAN RILEY 

7g1-W7-7797 m. 



Cameron Cleaning 
A Gardening 

House cleaning & garden 
work. Free job estimates. For 
services please call Georgia 
at (617) 471-5543 



SERVICES 



Your South Shore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franltlin Strett 
South Quincy 472-1710 




CUDDAHY 

CUSTOM 

BUILDERS 

Residential & Commercial 

Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, 

Decks, Siding. Replacement 

Windows, Doors. 

Roofing & Painting. 

Interior/Exterior. Licensed/Insured 

781-383-6785 ^2- 



a/26 



SUM CLASSmSD ADS 6ST WSULTS! 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

ThiOfieSPop Service Compofiif 

We Service & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • Resklential Air Conditk)ning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

SerWce . . . tt's Our Only Business 

Annual Tuna Ups $60, Includes nozzle & all Utter 

617-472-8641 24 hour Emergency Senrfce Jerry LaFlamme 



TF 



CEDRONE TREE & LANDSCAPE 

Professional Liindscape Construction & IMaintenance 



Insitallatlon 

Removal 

Tree pruning & Removal 

Stump Grinding 

Lot Clearing 



• Mulch Delivery , 

• Shmb Trimming 

• Bot)cat Service 

• Lawn arul Property 
Clean-ups. 



^Competitive Prices - Professional Workmanship* 

Fully Insured - Free EstlmatesI 

Call NOW 617-479-0474 



7/18 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 TF 



Timotliy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 



MA Reg. #116180 



TF 



Waupaper and f-^ainlina 
ou llu f-Mperhou 

Gerard Slwa 

GrmkmltotUSSdioololPn^M- 

$k)fmlPap0r Hanging, Rutland, VT 

617-471-SQe9 



Thank You God 
Say 9 Hail Mary's for 9 days, 
ask for 3 wishes, 1 business, 2 
impossible. Put)lish on 9th day. 
Your wishes will be answered. 

Thank You St. Theresa. 

MA.R rns 



Thank You 
St. Jude 

for prayers answered. 



ai> LR jj. ms 



Thank You 
Holy Spirit 



,*.K7«t 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
Q Autos 
Q Boats 
a For Rent 

□ Wanted 

Q Help Wanted 
a Worlc Wanted 

□ Pets 

Q Lost & Found 
Q Real Estate 
Q Antiques 
Q Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
Q Instruction 

□ Daycare 

□ Personal 

Q Miscellaneous 



RATES 
IWEEK 



3-7 WEEKS 



Q $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

10^ for each additional word. 
Q $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, \0c each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS Q $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8-12 insertions 

of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE I 

Q Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



$4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 10i2 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL^ MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCEUAnON. 
DBAOUNE: MONDAY, S:MPM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



P«g«32 



Thursday, July 15, 1999 



Swimming Pool Could Be Converted Into Youth Center 



(Cont'd frontpage /) 

erastion. 

Linda Slice, a member of 
the school committee who 
heads the Commission on 
the Family, welcomed the 
suggestion but said a lot of 
pround work needs to be 
done before a project like a 
teen center could be accom- 
plished. 

She said she learned of 
Father Keane's proposal just 
that morning of the GBIO 
meeting. 

"The city has community 
block grant funds that can She said those funds com- 
give money to special pro- prised about 25 percent of 




way. 

''It's a challenge in 
meeting those needs," said 
Slice. 

'in Quincy, there a number 
of programs that rely on the 
goodheartedness of 
churches, synagogues and 
other religious organiza- 
tions," she continued, tick- 
ing off the number of suc- 
cessful programs within the 



"We need to learn from 
what other people have done 
and keep talking, listening 
and learning. Sooner or 
later, funding will come 
along, you hope." 

"This may be a good 
idea," said Mayor James 



JO-ANN BRAGG 



grams," said Slice. 

Developing a teen center 
is not a far-fetched notion, 
she said. The federal money 
administered by the city can 
be given to a great many 
small social service agen- 
cies and youth programs, 
she added. 

In fact. Teen Get-Away 
received funds through 
community block grants. 

Jo-Ann Bragg, executive 
director of Teen Gel-Away 
and another school com- 
mittee member spearheaded 
efforts in 1991 to establish a 
youth center. After three 
years' work, Teen Get- 
Away became a reality. 

Bragg said she received 
initial funding from Impact 
Quincy and the Harold 
Brooks Foundation, before 
she received funds from the 
city through' block grants. 



the Teen Get-Away budget. 
Last month, Teen-Get- 
Away announced it had sev- 
ered its affiliation with the 
South Shore YMCA's 
Quincy facility which of- haps we can get together m 
fered programs for teens on a merger or can lend our 



UNDA SnCE 

what we didn't do." She 
declined to identify the 
group at this time. 

"They are kind of where 
we were in 1991," she said. 
"They don't have a home 
[for a teen center], but per- 



those whp belong to a par- 
ticular congregation," said 
Stice. 

She said she had met 
with Fitzmaurice and the 
Rev. Sheldon Bennett, min- 
ister of the United First 
Parish Church, several 

weeks ago to discuss the sheets> "We have to take a 
need for a youth center. \qq^ at it. 

"We're still at the learn- 
ing stage," she said. "The "Jo-Ann Bragg did an 

city boundaries - Quincy "°^*' ^^^''^ '^''*"« ""'j' e''<^<^»«^"» J^^ ^'^^ »»" P'^" 
' Weymouth s center, but gram. 

Weymouth is a different "There's no question in 

community. We don't know my mind that if we had a 

how to develop a successful program that brought young 

youth center." people in, kept them off the 

Stice continued: "Your streets, it would be very 

belief has to come before effective. 



Saturday nights, while 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church provided 
teen programs on Friday 
nights. Beginning this fall, 
the Y instead will host teen 
nights on both Friday and 



name," said Bragg. 

Stice said the first ques- 
tion she has is what kind of 
funding would be available. 

"The consensus is that 
kids need wholesome, safe, 



Teen Mothers at Bethany 
Congregational Church, the 
Quincy Mothers' Co-op at 
Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church, the AA 
meetings at countless 
churches and the day care 
programs, the Friends of the 
Unborn at St. John's Church 
and the lunch program at 
Father Bill's. 

Also, free meals are of- 
fered at the Covenant 
Church on Whitwell Street 
through the Quincy Crisis 
Center, she said. 

"Whenever there is a 
problem in Quincy, the 
ministers, rabbis and iman 



fun places to go so they 
Saturday" fea'.un"ng"basket" """j' «" i"'" """W'- ""^ ' p;i'e's't's"r«'p;j"nT Th'eya"« 
ball, swLming, fitness pro- """"J,""^" tl^^ -?■»"'« °f »" y""'"- 



sible effort to provide any 
kind of those activities," 
said Stice. 

"Kids and parents eve- 
But Teen Get-Away has rywhere are the same. They 



grams, dances, field trips 
and occasional guest speak- 
ers. 



"These programs are 
open to all kids, not just to 



money. Money follows 
great ideas, not necessarily 
the other way around. 

"Having done this for 25 
years, it's tempting to re- 
spond to an RFP (request 
for proposals). But the bet- 
ter way is to get an idea, an 
idea that comes from the 
people. 

"First you determine is 
there a genuine need or is 
the information anecdotal 
and see what other cities 
and towns have done and 
look at their success. 



"Some teens have too 
much time on their hands, 
wondering what to do to- 
night. To have structured, 
organized programs that are 
well administered and con- 
trolled would be superb," 
said Sheets. 

"That's why we open all the 
gyms during certain months 
of the school year for bas- 
ketball, volleyball," said 
Sheets. "A teen center 
would have the same phi- 
losophy." 



not dissolved, said Bragg. 
"We've met with another 
organization that is looking 
to open a teen center. We 
told them what we did and 



want the best for their chil- 
dren — safe neighborhoods, 
good schools, enough activ- 
ites to keep them occupied 
in a safe and wholesome 



Quincy College Wins 
Arbitration Decision 



Quincy College has won 
an arbitration decision, af- 



Finally, A Dental Office You Will Tell Your Friends About! 



Friendly, Experienced Staff 

Accepting Most Dental Plans 

Modem, Clean Bright Office 

New Exam & X-Rays $69 

Tooth Whitening 

Ask About 0% 

12 Month Financing Josep 



NOW SILVER TO 

"NATURAL WHITE'' 

ATA FEE EVERYONE CAN AFFORD! 

Upgrade Unsightly, Old Silver Fillings 

To The New "Invisible" Composites. 

It's Your Choice. 

Call NOW for a Consultation 

or Appointment 

A W. Com^lJL, 2).2).S. ^617) 479-6000 




110 West Squantum Street, North Quincy (A block from the Red Line) 
"Finally a Dental Office that will make you Smile!" 



firming its management there was no past practice in 

right to fill vacant positions regards to such situations. In 

without regard to union af- fact, the College assesses 

filiation. each vacancy as it occurs 

College President G. and makes an individual 

Jeremiah Ryan hailed the decision regarding how it 

decision as being a should be filled, Ryan said. 



"cornerstone for building 
the future of Quincy Col- 
lege." 

The college's teachers 



Richard Murphy of the 
law firm Murphy, Lamere 
and Murphy represented the 
college in the arbitration. 



union, the Quincy Education Murphy also serves as the 
Association, had grieved the college's legal counsel and 
replacement of a terminated chief negotiator. Ryan and 



Tlirn 



South Shore Buick 

BRAND MEW 
1999 BUICK CEHWRY 



^ — 



F-W 



Dozens to 
choose from! 



iQUIPKO, HOT SniPPfD 

$17,999 



Financing on 

every New 

'99 in stock! 



•VOOSeriesyS 

• Dual Comfoftemp Ah Conditionef 

• Power Windows . 

• Power Seat 

• Power door Locks 



Remote Keyless Eritry 
Anti-Lock Brakes 
Cruise Control 
AM-FM Stereo Cassette 

• Indudes r^te. 
** Financing in lieu of rebate. 



www.ssbuick.com 



50 ADAMS ST^ QUINCY • 770-3300 

LOCATED AT THE CORNER OF HANCOCK & ADAMS STREET BY THE QUINCY CENTER T 
Sales Hours: Mon-Thurs 8-8, Fri 8-6, Sat 9-5, Sun 12-4 




employee with adjunct fac- 
ulty. They charged that all 
the employees' prior 
courses need to be taught by 
union members. The arbi- 
trator disagreed, finding that 



Senior Vice President Patri- 
cia Gales testified at the 
arbitration. 

Murphy also had repre- 
sented the college in an ar- 
bitration case, which it won. 



the college had proven that sustaining its right tareor- 

M^^^^»^^— ^M^— ganize the academic divi- 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



sion and to hire exempt 
management staff to run the 
four academic centers. 




Neponset 
Pet Center & 
Animal Hospital 

• Full Service Veterinary Hospital 
• Pet Grooming • Pet Training 

• Pet Boarding • full Pet Supplies 

$17 VETERINARY VISIT 

Off ^ w'lih coupon, expires 7/3 1/99 

$37dOOFF~ 

Any Grooming, Veterinary or Boarding Service 

mm THIS comni, amn k commD wimAMrona offos, artm rmm 

Any Pef Supplies (minimttm $i5.oo) 

wimmiscounM, amoiKcommmo wnHmomaiofmnanmj/sm 



961 MORRISSEY BLVD., DORCHESTER 

tBoffon/MiicrM 617-288-2333 



*««u|uM«U««««««»«5-0IGIT 02269 
THOMAS CRAH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
?0 BOX 373 
OJINCY MA 02269 ^ 






VOL. 31 No. 43 



NEWS 
INSIDE 



Diner Granted 
Trial Extra Hours 

— Page! 

▼ 
Hospital CEO in 

Capital On 

Medicare Cuts 

~ Page 3 

▼ 
Continental Sloop 

To Pay Visit 

— Page 4 

T 
North Quincy 

High School 

Honor Roll 

— Pages 12 

How To Make 
Schools Safer 

— Page 16 

▼ 
Quincy Hosts 

Babe Ruth 

State Tourney 

— Page 17 

▼ 
Avoiding 

Heat Stress 

— Page 20 

3 More Take 

Nomination 

Papers 

— Page 28 



M 



«=>< 



Weather 
Forecast 



try 



MMh CMft n-N 



Historic Quincy's Hometown Weekly Newspaper 




Thursday. July 22. 1999 



35c 




DESPITE THE TORRID heat, tke 29th annual Quincy Center Sidewalk Festiyal drew 
large crowds on Hancock St The three-day event was sponsored by the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional Assodatkm. 

(Maralin Manning Photo) 

Business Boost For Merchants 

Despite Torrid Heat 
Festival A Success 



Residents In Survey: 

>Give Us 
Cleaner, 
Sandier 
Beaches' 

By MARILYN JACKSON 

Quincy residents want their beaches cleaner 
and sandier so they won't have to go elsewhere to 
swim. 



Despite last week's 
sweltering heat, the 29th 
annual Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival was a 
grand success. 

"I didn't know what to 
expect," said Michael Ar- 
nold of Shoofitz. "This was 
our flrst one. I was totally 
impressed. 

"The heat was brutal, but 
Maralin (Manning) and 
Marie (Watts) did a terrific 
job. So did Stephen Blum- 
berg (of Stephen Leigh Jew- 
elers). 

"I had two tents. We sell 
children's shoes. But next 
year I'll get four. We have 
access to women's shoes, 
like Nine West. ' 

"We used to be in South 
Boston, and they don't have 
anything like this," said Ar- 
nold. 

At the other end of the 



spectrum was Rogers Jew- 
elry, which has been par- 
ticipating from the begin- 
ning in the sidewalk festi- 
vals, sponsored by the 
Quincy Center Business & 
Professional Association. 

"We had an outstanding 
three days," said Jeff Bert- 
man of Rogers Jewelry. "It 
was the best ever." 

Bertman said the store's 
entire stock was on sale, and 
as a result, the store sold a 
lot of diamonds and gold 
and a lot of watches. "Many 
were for gifts, others for 
themselves. There was a lot 
of layaway." 

Outside their shop they 
sold silver jewelry for $10 
and less. There were ear- 
rings and toe rings, he said. 

From Granite Street to 
School Street, more than 
seven dozen tents or cano- 



pied booths edged Hancock 
Street so that shoppers and 
browsers could stroll down 
the street and see the mer- 
chandise on display. 

"If it hadn't been so hot, 
it would have been super," 
said Manning, who is ex- 
ecutive director of QCBPA. 
Watts works with Maiming. 

"The early mornings and 
evenings had exceptional 
attendance, but the crowds 
petered out a little midday," 
she said. "It was hot stand- 
ing on the concrete." 

"Overall, everyone did 
very well," said Deanna 
Gazarian of Phase II Jew- 
elry and president of 
QCBPA, 

"Each year it seems to be 
getting better. We're more 

(Cmt'd on page 10) 



That was the result of a 
citywide survey compiled 
during the past three months 
by the mayor's commission 
on beaches, said Leo Kelly, 
chairman. 

This week as folks pre- 
pared for more seasonally 
hot weather, both the city's 
legislative delegation and 
the beach commission fo- 
cused their attention on the 
city's beaches which are 
considered a jewel. The 
members want not only to 
preserve what already exists 
but promote the beaches as 
weU. 

"Because Wollaston 
Beach has a bad reputation 
[of water pollution], the 
other city beaches have suf- 
fered," said Kelly, who had 



called for a press conference 
at 1 p.m. today (Thursday) 
at Mound Beach in Quincy 
Point to highlight the ad- 
vantages of a small city 
beach and unveil the results 
of a survey compiled by the 
beach conunission. 

Meanwhile, early yester- 
day (Wednesday) morning. 
Metropolitan District Com- 
mission head David Balfour 
was scheduled to meet with 
Sen. Michael Morrissey and 
state Reps. Stephen Tobin 
and Bruce Ayers to discuss 
the current condition and 
future improvements X^ 
Wollaston Beach. 

"Wollaston Beach is a 

popular location for many 

South Shore residents. It is 

(Cont'd <Hi page 19) 



14 Police Officers May 
Seek Early Retirement 



As many as 14 police 
officers may opt for early 
retirement in February, ac- 
cording to Police Chief 
Thomas Frane. 

But because some of 
them are electing early re- 
tirement through an incen- 
tive provision in the new 
police contract, the depart- 
ment did not release the 
individuals' names. They 
can change their minds and 
return the financial incen- 
tive to die city. Mandati^ 
requirement is at age 65, 



said the chief 

"Since I've been here [as 
chief], 20 already have re- 
tired. I'd bet, in the past 
three years, with these 14, it 
will be up to 40," said 
Frane. 

As the result of the re- 
tirements and seven poten- 
tial vacancies due to pro- 
motions, Frane hopes to 
have 21 new officers en- 
rolled in the police academy 
in October. 

It's up to the mayor to 
make the promotidns, add^l 



Frane, but all are available 
from the various promo- 
tional lists. He said there is 
vacancies in the following 
ranks — one as captain, two 
as lieutenant and four as 
sergeant. 

He said the prospective 
officers have already passed 
the entrance exam and now 
are undergoing the required 
physicals. 

Frane said when the new 
officers come on board, 
there will be 167 patrolmen, 
29 sergeants, 16 lieutenants 



and five captains, plus the 
chief 

Frane said when he first 
joined the Quincy depart- 
ment 18 years ago, there 
were 188 patrolmen. Over 
the years, through cutbacks 
and attritj^on, the patroi 
stafHng dropped to the high 
140s. 

"Gradually, it's inching 
back up," said Frane. 

Under a three-year fed- 
eral grant, the city is re- 
ceiving $25,000 each for 17 

(Cont'd at page 25) 




i 



THAT OLD SMOOTHIE Dm GoU trks oat a hw stefM 
with SoiaBac LockwMd (D J. S«iie Cm) at the Bmmk, of 
CaatM booth diirteg the QidKy Ceatcr Sidewalk FcstiraL 

(MmrttlmManmngPkotei 



PiH»2 ThmQaUaMtyaan 'niiin<la;,Jgl;22,l*9* 



School Employees 
Negotiations Stall 



Negotiations between the 
Ouincy Educational Em- 
ployees Union and the 
Ouincy public schools 
ended Monday without a 
settlement in sight, accord- 
ing to Pamela Whitney- 
Maher, union president. 

The union, which is rep- 
resented by District 925 of 
the Service Employees In- 



ternational Union, said it is 
stalled on two issues — 
promotions and longevity. 

The union claims that 
school administrators use 
an arbitrary promotional 
system, not hiring either the 
most qualiHed or most sen- 
ior. 

Whitney-Maher said the 
issue of longevity is differ- 



ent from other school and 
city employees for the 
Quincy school secretaries as 
well as school aides, which 
is a separate unit. 

She said they have been 
negotiating for more than 13 
months and are trying to 
security parity of benefits 
with other unions in the city. 



Board Grants Diner 
Trial Extended Hours 



G.T. Coddington's 



FAMILY RESTAURANT (617) 472-9950 

Kitchen Under New Management... Exciting New Specials! 
Featuring . . . Pasta • Seafood • Chicken • Prime Rib 



20% OFF Your Entire Bill 

5-9pm Daily 

with this coupon. Excluding beverage, alcohol & tax. Gratuity based on full value. 
One coupon per customer, not valid with other promotions or discounts. Exp. 7/31/99 



Outdoor Patio Dining in Historic Quincy Center 
Private Function Room Available FREE Validated Parking 

1250 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY CENTER 



By MARIE D'OLIMPIO 

On a 4-1 vote, the 
License Board Tuesday 
voted in favor of the 
Wheelhouse Diner 453 
Hancock St. of extending 
its hours to 3 a.m. on 
Fridays and Saturdays on a 
90 day trial. 

The motion was made 
by Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman, and seconded by 
Andrew Sheele, health 
inspector, sitting in for 
Jane Gallahue who was on 
vacation.. 

Voting against the 
request was Building 
Inspector Walter white 
who said he was 
concerned about persons 
living in Boston and other 
cities coming to Quincy 
and said it was "not a plus 
to North Quincy." 

However, owners Lucky 
Trifilos and Sean Toland 
told the board that 



Feeling Stranded? Abandoned? J^ 
Come to OSCO... 

We're Still Here For You! 






Featuring FOODMART 

Eggs • Milk • Bread 
Convenience • Grocery 



SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

5 for $6 

• 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 
• 1 gallon of West Lynn Milk (1%, 2% or fat free) • Best Buy 
English Muffins • Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid while supplies last, one special per coupon. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Price increase due to our increased mUkcost. 
. Valid Sunday 7/25/99 only. Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. , 



SUNDAY BOSTON GLOBES 
& HERALDS $1.50 



Price Valid at this Osco Drug location only, until at least 8/1/991 




Your Osco in North Quincy, a one-stop 
store committed to your neighborhood. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted. (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am'noon) 



Bickford's in Neponset is 
also opened late and they 
didn't think that would be 
a problem. 

Trinios and Toland also 
own the Union Diner on 
Billings Rd and were cited 
as being "community 
oriented" by Ward 6 
Councillor Bruce Ayers, 
who spoke in support of 
the move. 

The owners told the 
board that since taking 
over the diner in January 
of this year, the 33 seat 
diner's business "has 
improved" and that 
renovations were made 
and updated up to code. 

Chairman Joseph Shea 
said in view of the fact 
that Bickford's in Quincy 
Center is also opened he 
said Wheelhouse "de- 
serves a try." 



Although voting in favor 
of the move. Police Chief 
Thomas Frane said he 
agreed with White's 
concerns. However,, he 
said in fairness to 
Bickford's ability to open 
until 3 a.m. he would 
suf^rt Wheelhouse Diver. 

He added that he "won't 
wait three months" if any 
accidents occur and that 
he would not "risk safety" 
and would "be watching if 
things get out of control". 

The hours would be 
from 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Monday through Friday 
and from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Saturdays and Sundays. 

The diner would be 
closed on Fridays and 
Saturdays at 3 p.m. and 
then re-open at 11 p.m. 
until 3 a.m. 



Council Hearing Aug. 2 
On Willard St. Rezoning 



The Quincy City Council 
will hold a public hearing at 
8 p.m. Aug. 2 at city hall to 
consider rezoning an ap- 
proximately 10-acre site off 
Willard Street which is 
presently owned by the Na- 
tional Fire Protection Asso- 
ciation. 

The land, presently 
zoned as Residence C, could 
be rezoned to a planned unit 
development district. 

The address of the land is 
on the southeasterly side of 



Willard Street, from 786 to 
792 Willard and on the 
southerly side of St. Moritz 
Avenue, from 11 to 39 St. 
Moritz. 

According to Richard 
Meade, planning director, 
the land is between two 
buildings, behind the brick 
apartment buildings on 
Willard Street. 

Developer Michael Cor- 
coran has an option to pur- 
chase the land from NFPA, 
said an NFPA spokesperson. 



Marvel Beauty Shop 



IVrmancnts 



& up 



' • Shampoo & Cut 

Experienced Hair (Olorists 
with an cmpluisis on Conwlivc colorini^ 

Validated raikm^^ • Open f> davs at S:()()am 
5 CO HACK AVK., Ql INCY • 617-472-9681 




Neponset 
Pet Center & 
Animal Hospital 

• FullSetvlte Veteriaaty Hospital 
• Pel Grooming * Pet Training 

* Pet Boarding • Full Pet Supplies 

$17 VETERINARY VISIT 

only whk €o»pon, wplim 7/31/99 

$iooofiF""" 

Any Grooming, Veterinary or Boarding Service 

mnimB(ouNii,amormammDmiimoma(mB,aFms7/ij/f9 



$2.00 OFF 



Any Pet Supplies (niiiiaMi siSiNQ 
mmmB(omi^ammmamtamaiMrottmomB^BnB7/im 



961 MORRISSEY BLVD., DORCHESTER 

(■HdM/iMKfM 6I7-2S8-2332 



Thursday, July 22, 1999 



Hospital CEO In Washington On Medicare Cuts 



Quincy Hospital CEO 
Jeff Doran was among 
nearly two dozen hospital 
executives who were to 
travel to Washington 
Wednesday to lobby Con- 
gress to modify the 1997 
Balanced Budget Act. 

That law, which was de- 
vised to slash Medicare 
payments by $115 billion 
over a five-year period, will 
actually cut $220 billion, 
according to the Massachu- 
setts Hospital Association. 

"I will be echoing the 
sentiments of the Massachu- 
setts CEOs as well as those 
throughout the country but 
from a Massachusetts per- 
spective," said Doran. 

"We have been excep- 
tionally hard hit by the Bal- 
anced Budget Act and the 
reimbursement changes. 

"The message we want to 
convey is how it affects the 
local community, how it 
impacts — and already has 
impacted — Quincy." 

A financial analyst for 
the MHA estimates that the 
state's community hospitals 
would face $724 million in 
Medicare lost reimburse- 
ments by the year 2003. 

That translates to a pro- 
jected $18 million loss for 
Quincy Hospital. 

But Doran differs with 
that estimate. The MHA 
requested all the hospitals to 
submit data of what pay- 
ments each hospital experi- 
enced prior to the Balanced 



Budget Act and post-BBA, 
said Doran, and then com- 
puted the projections for 
each individual hospital. 

"Quincy [would be] over 
that. Eighteen million dol- 
lars doesn't include some of 
the outpatient payment re- 
ductions or the payments to 
subacute units," said Doran. 

"Built into this Medicare 
payment program are many 
subtle reimbursement provi- 
sions. Many have been ad- 
justed, tweaked and modi- 
fied through the BBA," said 
Doran. 

"We have experienced 
dramatic reductions in pay- 
ments, which prompted us 
cutting the maternity and 
prenatal programs," said 
Doran. 

"I can recite other cur- 
tailments," he continued. 
"Homecare service has re- 
tracted probably 25 percent 
since the cuts came into 
effect. 

"That's a real impact on 
the poor, the homebound. 
They are now receiving less 
intensive services than pre- 
viously," he said. 

He said Quincy Hospital 
also discontinued its outpa- 
tient chronic pain clinic a 
year ago, and the hospital is 
trying to find a creative way 
to restart that service. 

Looking forward, Doran 

said he was prepared to give 

examples of anticipated 

(Cont'd on page 13) 



$1,500 Donation For Ward 1 
Community Policing Program 



Atlantic Development 
company has donated 
$1,500 to the Ward 1 com- 
munity policing program to 
be used for bike police uni- 
forms. 

"The City of Quincy very 
much appreciates the ongo- 
ing relationship with Atlan- 
tic Development Company 



and the role it has and con- 
tinues to play in the city," 
said City Council President 
and Ward 1 councillor Peter 
Kolson. 

The community policing 
program and the bike patrols 
have proven to be highly 
effective and have benefited 
the entire city, said Kolson. 



IBmnyg Clean^erjgr, int 



CLEANING 




TAILORING 



THY US AND SEE 
THE DIFFERENCE! 

• Shirt Service 

• Wedding Gowns 

• Full Tailoring Service 

* Superior Dry Cleaning • Free Storage 

Same Day Servlie 

Large Accessible Parking Lot 

Free 24 Hour VIP Express Service 

Nmnst UKoHonl 

642 Adams St., Quincy 

(iMxt to Montillo's BaltMy) 

617-472-6262 

Elm St., Braintree (781) 843-1678 

Adorns St., Eost Milton (61 7) 696-7047 



'3.00 Off 



I Amt 4 OR MoRi fnm i 

I buUlKf ikktt. b^lm 7/S1/9f I 

I 1 




MAYOR'S PARTNERING Task Force recently expressed 
its support at a publk hearing for a home nik petition that 
would make Qubcy Hospital a private, non-profit hospital 
that would affiliate with Boston Medical Center. The task 
force, achieved unanimous support for the affiliation ft-om 
the Quincy Hospital Board of Managers, em|rioyees, unions, 
managers, and phyddans. Charter by Mayor James Sheets, 
the task force met regularly over the past year to exptore the 
Aill range of options and make recommendations regarding 
the foturc of Quincy Hospital. Front row, fkt>m tell: Mary 
Sweeney, VP of Strategic Services, Quincy Hospital; EUen 
Hafer, director, Manet Community Health Center; Hospital 
CEO Jeffrey Doran; Councillor Frank McCauley; and 
Bcrakc Madcr, administrative assistant to Mayor Sheets. 



Second row, Renee Buisson, Associate VP of Public 
Relations, Qumcy Hospital; Cari Weaver, VP of Oinical and 
Support Services, Quincy Hospital; Janet Madigan, Vice 
President of Nursing Services, Quincy Hospital; Paula Ryan, 
RN; Ruth Pannella, RN, MNA representative; Bonnie Siegal, 
First Albany Corporation. Back row: Mark Gronberg, Chief 
Financial Officer, Quincy Hospital; Louis Mazzini, hospital 
Board of Managers; Donald Tracy, MD, radiologist; Rick 
Cove, VP of Human Resources, Quincy Hospital; Alan 
Bcrrick, MD, cardiologist; Judith Keith, PT, 285 Union 
Representative; Louis Herlin, MD, medical director of 
Anesthesia Services, Quincy Hospital; Kevin Madden, 
director of Personnel, City of Quincy; and Charles Arienti, 
director, respiratory therapy. 



Do you dread dealing with 
another bank merger? 

You're wanted & welcome 
at Colonial Federal ! 




We are Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank - chartered in 1889 and 
still a 100% local neighborhood 
bank. Our South Shore roots are 
deep and we have everything you 
need and want from a bank today. 
Like what? Personal & commercial 
checking accounts with 24 -hour 
ATM/debit card access, 'round-the- 
clock telephone banking, higher 
rates on Certificates, competitive 
rates on loans, convenient ATMs & 
drive-up tellers, lots of fiiee parking. 



Colonial Federal 
Savinifs Hank- 
100% local. ^ 
100% friendly. 



local decision-makers who know the 
market and happy employees who will 
go out of their way to make sure you 
are a satisfied customer. Best of all, 
we are an 



24-MONTH CERTIFICATE 



independent 

mutual bank, 

which means 

we cannot 

be taken over 

or forced into 

a hostile merger. Sound good? 

Come see us. Or call 617-471-0750. 





OHjONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY: 15 Beach St., next to Wollaston Post Office 617-471-0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle & Washington Sts., next to Stop & Shop 781-331-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Frankhn St.. next to Stop* Shop 781-767-1776 

APY as of 7/7, 99 Rate subject to change Minimum deposit is $1001). IRA and 401 K loUown are welcome 
A penalty may be un|>OMd for evly withdrawal. Other rates Si terms are available. Please ask for more mforniation! 



biMimi l-DK 



fi 



Page 4 TlM Quinoy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1999 



ClDINICN 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35c per copy. $1 5.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$17.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $20.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financiaJ rasponsiblity for typographtcal errors in 
advertisements but will reprint that part of an advertisement in wtilch the typographical 
error occurs. 



Senior Citizens 
Conference To Be 
Held On Sept. 18 



The fourth annual city of 
Quincy Senior Citizens 
Conference sponsored by 
the Quincy Department of 
Elder Services and the 
Quincy Conirrission on 
Family will be held Satur- 
day, Sept 18, at the Broad 
Meadows MirJdle School. 

Among the participants 
will beriTWayor James 
Sheets; Lillian Glickman, 
Secretary of the Massachu- 
setts Executive Office of 
Eider Affairs; James Perk- 



ins, National President of 
the American Association of 
Retired Persons; Walter 
Sanders, Massachusetts 
President AARP and former 
WBZ-TV Channel Four 
news anchor; Chief One 

Bear Tremblay of Wey- 
mouth, the Order of Protec- 
tion of Indian Culture and 
James Earl Kyle of Dor- 
chester, senior activities 
coordinator State Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 




THE HISTORY CHANNEL. 

On July 19-20, 1848, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady 
Stanton led a Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, 
N.Y. ... July 21, 1861, the Confederates repelled Union 
forces at the first Battle of Bull Run ... July 25, 1898, 
Puerto Rico was taken by the U.S. ... July 22, 1916. a 
bomb exploded during the San Francisco Preparedness Day 
parade, killing 10 people . . . July 24, 1925, John T. Scopes 
was found guilty of having taught evolution at a Dayton, 
Tenn., high school; he was fined $100 and court costs ... 
July 25, 1963, a limited nuclear test-ban treaty was agreed 
upon by the U.S., Great Britain, and the Soviet Union ... 
July 23, 1967, race riots began in Detroit, Mich. ... July 
20, 1969, U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of 
the Apollo 1 1 mission, became the first person to set food 
on the moon, followed by astronaut Edwin Aldrin; astro- 
naut Michael Collins remained aboard the command mod- 
ule ... July 24, 1974, the House Judiciary Committee 
began televised healings on the impeachment of President 
Richard Nixon ... July 24, 1974, the U.S. Supreme Court 
ruled, 8-0, that President Nixon had to turn over 64 tapes to 
the House Judiciary Committee; the tapes consisted of 
White House conversations ... July 21-24, 1976, 
"Legionnaire's disease" killed 29 people who attended an 
American Legion convention in Philadelphia ... July 19, 
1993, President Clinton announced a "don't ask, don't tell, 
don't pursue" policy for homosexuals in the U.S. military 
. . . July 25, 1997, Autumn Jackson, who claimed to be the 
illegitimate daughter of comedian Bill Cosby, was convict- 
ed of seeking to extort $40 million from him ... July 21, 
1998, President Clinton vetoed a bill that would have 
allowed parents to put $2,000 per child per year into spe- 
cial savings accounts that would accrue tax-free interest 
and could be used to pay private-school tuition, buy school 
books, and meet other school expenses . . . July 24, 1998, 
two U.S. Capitol Police officers were killed by a gunman at 
the Capitol in Washington, D.C. 

O 1999 King Features Synd.. lac. 




Future president Franklin 
D. Roosevelt spent much of 
his youth summering at 
Campobello Island in New 
Bnjnswick, Canada. His cot- 
tage is now part of a joint 
Canadian-Amerfcan inter- 
national park. 



After serving as Preskient 
from 1865 to 1869, Andrew 
Johnson was elected and 
served as Senator from 
Tennessee in 1875. 




SanbeaiXiis 



By Henry Bosworth 



Campaigning By Train 



Nowadays presidential candidates hop on a plane 
to get to campaign stops. 

It does get them there quickly. 

But I think both the voters and the press got a closer 
in-person look and impression of them when they trav- 
elled by train back in the good old days. 

The train rolled into the station and the candidate 
spoke from the rear platform with the crowd gathered 
around to look him over and listen to what he had to 
say. 

They called them "whistle stops." But sometimes 
the train just whistled and didn't stop. 

Like in 1948 when Harry Truman roared right 
through Quincy, right past the birthplaces of John and 
John Quincy Adams without even a pause. 

I was assigned to cover him that morning and caught 
up to him in Brockton where he did stop and speak. 

Adiai Stevenson, four years later, was a different 
and more fun story. 

I traveled with Stevenson aboard 
his campaign train from Boston to 
Quincy to Rhode Island Oct. 27, 
1952. 

And whenever I look back on that 
day it reminds me how dramatically STEVENSON 
the lives of some people can change in just a few short 
years. 

There were only 3,000 people in the then Republi- 
can stronghold of Quincy who turned out at the old 
Quincy Depot to see and listen to the Democratic presi- 
dential nominee. 

Stevenson spoke eloquently (some think he was 
sometimes too eloquent), sprinkling his words with 
bits of humor. His special target here in Quincy that 
day was Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy who was 
on his famed witch hunt. 

When a plane appeared overhead partly drowning 
him out, Stevenson looked up and quipped: "A Re- 
publican pilot, I imagine." 

Stevenson had a Hollywood star supporting cast 
with him. Among those aboard the train: Humphrey 
Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Robert Ryan. 

Bacall, a very attractive young woman, got off the 





train and stood nearby listening to Stevenson. But as I 
recall, I don't think too many people actually recog- 
nized her or realized she was standing there. 

David Crowley, then a city councillor and a Demo- 
cratic candidate for Congress, had the honor of intro- 
ducing Stevenson. 

I don't remember his exact words but the introduc- 
tion went something like this: "... and now, ladies 
and gentlemen, I give you the next President of the 
United States, Adlai E. Stevenson." 

Crowley was wrong, of course. The next President 
of the United States would be Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

But Crowley that day did introduce the next Demo- 
cratic president though neither he nor the crowd real- 
ized it at the time. 

For on the rear platform of the train with Stevenson 
but quite overshadowed by the man 
from Illinois was a man from Mas- 
sachusetts~a young, slim Congress- 
man named John F. Kennedy. 

But Kennedy was but a political 
"also" in the Stevenson party. 
Eclipsed not only by Stevenson but 
by Gov. Paul Dever, too. 

Yet, in just eight short years, he would be elected 
President and Stevenson would become his ambassa- 
dor to the United Nations. 
^g^^^^ I also remember then Police 

^^S^^k Captain William Ferrazzi, later to be- 
^^^2|r come chief, who was in charge of 
security for Stevenson's visit. 

He had 40 men positioned 
around the Quincy Depot and others 

FERRAZZI posted on bridges along the railroad 
tracks. 

And, on buildings. 

And who could have dreamed that the young Con- 
gressman standing with Stevenson in Quincy that day 
would become President but was to keep a tragic date 
with fate below a building in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. 

"You've got to watch those buildings," Ferrazzi had 
said. 

Someone didn't in Dallas. 



KENNEDY 




Continental Navy Vessel To Visit Quincy Bay 



The Continental Sloop 
Providence, a Tall Ship of 
international stature and an 
authentic replica of the first 
vessel in the Continental 
Navy, will patrol the waters 
of historic Quincy and Hull 
Bays and the Boston Harbor 
Islands July 26-28. 

She will stop in the ports 
of Hull on Monday, July 26 
and Quincy on Tuesday, 
July 27 and Wednesday, 
July 28. Her Captain invites 
all Tall Ship fans to step 
aboard to tour the ship and 
perhaps set sail for a short 
training sail among the 
Boston Harbor Islands 
aboard a Tall Ship. 

Her schedule in Hull and 
Quincy: 

Free dockside open 
house, 9 a.m. to noon; youth 
training sail, $35 per person, 
1 to 4 p.m. for youth 14 to 
18 years old; adult sail, $75, 
5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for all 
ages. 



Reservations for all sails 
from Hull and Quincy arc 
required. There is limited 
space to sail a leg of the 
passage north from Quincy. 

Trainees 16 and older 
can board in Quincy on 
Thursday, July 29 by 8 a.m., 
and sail north to a northedy 
port to be determined. Cost 
is $100 per person for the 
day. 

In Hull the Providence 
will be docked at Pemberton 
Pier, and in Quincy at the 
Harbor Express dock adja- 
cent to the US Naval Ship- 
building Museum. Free 
parking is available and 
both locations are accessible 
by auto and from Boston 
and other locations by Har- 
bor Express water ferry 
system. Call 617-376-8417 
for water ferry schedule and 
rate information. 

The 110-foot square top- 
sail sloop is an authentic 



replica of the original 
Providence, the first com- 
mand of Captain John Paul 
Jones. The original vessel 
was built as the Katy for a 
Providence merchant, and 
was purchased by the Con- 
tinental Congress on Oct. 
13, 1775 to become one of 
the Hrst vessels in the Con- 
tinental Navy. 

Rechristened as the 
Providence and armed with 
12 cannon, Captain John 
Paul Jones was piped aboard 
on May 10, 1776. On patrol 
along the east coast of the 
Colonies from 1776 to 
1779, she earned the nick- 
name "Lucky Sloop" and 
captured a total of 40 British 
ships as prizes before Provi- 
dence was burned by her 
crew to avoid capture on 
Aug. 16, 1779 in Maine. 

Throughout her career, 
she was known for her abil- 
ity to engage and best much 
Uuger British vessels. 

Today's Providence was 



launched in 1976 as an 
authentic recreation of the 
original vessel, and operates 
both as a living symbol of 
the pluck and determination 

of our forefathers, and as a 
living classroom for youth 
of all ages. 

She sails New England 
waters taking trainees 
aboard for the adventure of 
a lifetime on both day sails 
and multi day passages, and 
educates them in the disap- 
pearing art of sailing a Tall 
Ship. All aboard become an 
active member of the crew 
while underway, and they 
may be called on to hoist 
and tune sails, aim cannon, 
stand watch or take a trick at 
the tiller. 

To reserve a spot for a 
sail aboard the Providence 
or to book a sail aboard a 
Tall Ship anywhere on the 
seven seas, contact the 
Boston Nautical Heritage 
Group at 781-334-1749. 



Thuraday, July 22, 1999 Tlkm Qialney Sm> Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS ISA 1917 real photo postcard view lookuig south 
fixHn the intersectJon of Atlantic and East Squantum 
Streets in Atlantic Charlie's Market is now on the 
comer on the far right and Kip Orlando's barbershop 
is where the tree is on the left The hirge Victorian style 
house on the left was built in the late 1890's for Henry 
W. Read a well-to-do Boston merchant He lived there 
for twenty-five years and his widow Mary was there 



until 1950. Still extant the house has been altered and 
divided into apartments. Another house has been built 
just beyond it before the next house in this view. The 
trolley tracks in the foreground turned right at the 
intersection with Billings Street and went down to the 
Atlantic railroad depot Hie Barron Souvenir Co. of 
Dorchester published this postcard. 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



r 

J 



Ri :\i)i:rs Forum 



Editor, The Quincy Sim: 
As the Medical Assistant 
instructor in the Health and 
Human Service Department 
at Quincy High School 's 
Center for Technical Edu- 
cation, I would like to say 
"thank you" to Quincy Hos- 
pital. My program could not 
survive without you. Thanks 
to the guidance of so many 



Thank You, Quincy Hospital 

people, my students and I 
had a wonderful year. 



In particular, my thanks 
to Betty Cifuni for coordi- 
nating our schedule and 
without whom the program 
could not continue. Also, I 
am grateful to those people 
who spent countless hours 
with my students, nurturing 



and mentoring. Those peo- 
ple are: Claire and Deborah 
in Billing; Joyce and Char- 
lene in Cashier; Mary in 
Medical Records; Betty and 
Suzanne in Occupational 
Health; Donna in Patient 
Admitting; Susan in Patient 
Finances; Tamara and Jean 
in Public Relations; Linda in 
Radiology; Sandy in Rehab; 



and Kathy and Debbie and 
the nurses on A6. A special 
thank you to Kim in Secu- 
rity who worked diligently 
to insure our transportation. 
Thank you, and we look 
forward to returning in the 
fall. 

Gina Scanlan 
15 Glendale Road 



Agrees Memorial Day Parade Should Not Be Canceled 



Editor, The Quincy Sun; 

I have just finished 
reading a letter from 
Thomas Stansbury (Quincy 
Sun, July 8), Parade 
Chairman, Quincy 
Veteran's Council. I totally 
agree with him. (That the 
Memorial Day Parade 
should not be cancelled) 

I grew up in Mattapan 
right around the corner 
from where the parade 
started. When I was old 
enough (11-12) I followed 
the parade over to the 
veterans section of Mt. 
Hope Cemetery. Those 
visions (of white crosses), 
speeches and times have 
always stayed with me; 



Remember our Veterans 
who gave so much for us. I 
lost an uncle, who I never 
knew, in WWII. My dad, 
brother, uncles and 
husband have all served 
their/our country with 
pride. My dad was a 
naturalized citizen and 
America meant everything 
to him, it ranked number 
one along with family. 

I do not live in Quincy. 
However, I have been to 
the Memorial Day, Flag 
Day and Veterans Day 
parades, since I was a 
small child, with my 
parents. When I got 
married I brought my 
children, as Quincy was 



one of the biggest and best 
attended parades. 

My children also got to 
watch their father march in 
various Quincy parades for 
10-15 years. He was in one 
group or another (USA, 
USAR, Vietnam Veterans, 
American Legion color 
guard, VFW color guard). 

I spent the Fourth of 
July this year in 
Washington, D.C. My 

husband and I watched the 
parade (in 98 degrees), 
honoring the birth of our 
country, with thousands. I 
wouldn't miss any of the 
patriotic recognition of our 
country, and those who 



have defended her. 
. Please, I pray that our 
holiday parades to honor 
those who gave so much 
for us do not get cancelled. 
This generation seems not 
to know the true meaning 
of our holidays. The 
holidays are not a separate 
day, but long weekends. 
With the change of the 
blue laws there is no more 
family-day time anymore. 
Time when families did 
things together. 

Again, please keep the 
true nature of our patriotic 
holidays. Thank you. 

Elizabeth L. Hayes 

Leonard St. 

Canton 



MWRA Thanks Mariano On Water, Sewer Rates 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

The MWRA Advisory 
Board would like to 
publicly thank 

Representative Ronald 
Mariano for his work on 
behalf of ratepayers during 
this year's House budget 
process. Once again. 
Representative Mariano 
has made controlling water 
and sewer rates a top 
jMiwity. 

Due to Representative 
Mariano's leadership as 
Vice-Chairman of the 
MWRA Caucus, the 
House budget includes 
approximately $48.5 



million in debt service 
assistance to the MWRA, 
including $4.2 million of 
the Metro West Water 
Supply Tunnel. It was 
Representative Mariano's 
Amendment to the House 
budget which also allows 

debt service assistance for 
the Walnut Hill Water 
Treatment Plant. Without 
this level of assistance 
ratepayers would be faced 
with double-digit 
wholesale rate increases 
for FY2000. In addition, 
the budget includes 
$500,000 for the Town of 
Clinton to ' partially 



reimburse the MWRA for 
the operation of their 
wastewater treatment 
plant. These measures 
amount to significant 
savings to MWRA 
ratepayers. 

In a cause championed 
by Representative 
Mariano, the House budget 
contains language which 
requires the MDC 
Watershed Division to 
present their annual budget 
to the Advisory Board. 
MWRA ratepayers pay 
100% of the Watershed 

Division budget and 
currently hive no say in 



how the funds are spent. 
This budget language will 
take us one step closer to 
our goal of holding the 
MDC Watershed Division 
accountable to MWRA 
ratepayers. 

The Advisory Board 
greatly appreciates the 
Legislature's commitment 
to rate relief in this budget 
and over the past several 
years, we owe much of 
this legislative support to 
Representative Marian and 
his efforts to push pro 
ratepayer measures to the 
forefrcHit of debate. 

Josieph E. Favaloro | 
Executive Director ' 



Quincy*s 
Yesterdays 



July 22 - 28 

1953 
46 years Ago 



City Celebrates 
End Of Korean War 

By PAUL HAROLD 

The end of the Korean War was celebrated with a spon- 
taneous, low-keyed gathering in front of City Hall. As the 
news reports of the war's end leaked out, citizens gathered to 
hear City Councillor Carl Anderson speak on behalf of the 
city. Mayor David Mcintosh was on vacation. 

"The news of the armistice is cause for thanksgiving to all 
the people of Quincy and par- 
ticularly the scores of Quincy 
residents whose sons and hus- 
bands have served so heroically 
in the Korean conflict," he said. 

The city's Veterans Services 

Department recorded 30 men from Quincy killed, including 
six who were missing in action. 

FORMER GOVERNOR TOBIN DIES 
President Harry Truman headed the 8,000 people who 
attended the funeral in Boston for Maurice Tobin who served 
as governor, mayor of Boston and secretary of Labor. 

Tobin lived in Quincy Point during his pre-school days in 
the house on the comer of Washington and Arnold Streets. 
His father worked as a shipwright at the shipyard. He had 
many relatives in the city, including three cousins who 
served as pall bearers. His uncle, Timothy Daly, was origi- 
nally from Quincy Point, later moving to West Quincy. 

Tobin died at age 52. At age 43, he was believed to be the 
youngest person elected governor. 

GROUND BROKEN FOR 

HANCOCK PARKING AREA 

Instead of using the ceremonial shovel, Harry Van Dam, 

president of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce, broke 

ground for the new Hancock Parking Area by taking over the 

controls of the contractor's steam shovel. 

Others attending were City Manager William Deegan, 
Councillors Edna Austin and Amelio Delia Chiesa, DPW 
Commissioner Charles Herbert, Joseph Leary, president of 
the Merchants' Division of the Chamber of Commerce and 
the chamber's Executive Vice President William O'Connell. 
QUINCY-ISMS 
George McDonald of Yardarm Lane took out nomination 
papers for the city council. Both is late father, George, and 
his uncle, Thomas, served on the council. . . By a 4-3 vote, 
rent control was continued in the city. Voting in favor were 
Councillors David Crowley, Carl Anderson, Frank OrQmt 
and Alfred Helfrich. Voting against were Councillors Delia 
Chiesa, Edna Austin and Mayor David Mcintosh. . . Four 
Wollaston churches held a union service at Wollaston Uni- 
tarian Church to hear Rev. Wallace Bush preach. Others 
participating were Wollaston's Baptist, Congregational and 
Methodist churches. . . A son was bom at Quincy City 
Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Carmine D'Olimpio. . .One of the 
country's largest tankers, the 29,300 too S.S. Orion Comet, 
was launched at Fore River Shipyard. . . Arthur Morrisette, 
age 74, was granted a pension after 25 years working as a 
laborer for the city. . . The city council authorized funds for 
an engineering study of Broad Meadows to judge its suitabil- 
ity as a school site. . . A funeral was held for Rev. Julius 
Sandlovitz who served for half a century as the spiritual head 
of Ahavath Achim (Brotherly Love) Synagogue on School 
St. The services were under the direction of Rabbi Jacob 
Mann of Beth Israel assisted by Rabbi Ephrain Greenberg of 
Temple Beth El and synagogue president Reuben Grossman. 
Rabbi Abraham Borvich of Dorchester suffered a heart 
attack and died while eulogizing Sandlovitz. . . Seven new 
polio cases were reported on the South Shore, including a 
five-year-old North Quincy girl. . . Tommy Williams, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Williams of Lebanon St., 
celebrated his fifth birthday with a weenie roast. Among 
those attending was his grandfather, John J. Duane. . . Alfred 
Saluti was ticket chairman for the John Quincy Adams 
Club's fEunily picnic. . . A daughter was bom at Quincy 
HospiUl to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph DeGust of Riverside Ave. . 
. Quincy High School graduate Robert Woodward was 
named the first Loeb professor of chemistry at Harvard. He 
reached international prominence for his role in developing 
"miracle drugs," including the syntlwsis for quinine used in 
the treatment of malaria. His mother. Mis. Maigaiet Chase, 

lived on Holbrook Rd Bostoo College student George 

Riley of Quincy Shore Drive was at the Marine Corps School 
at Quantioo, VA. . . Rev. Chester Porteia was chaplain of the 
Rotary Qub. 



Pate 6 TTlMi QuiBOj- Sua Thortdajr, Jvly 22, 1999 




Barbara's 3 Berries Pie 



Berries Pie 
or unsweetened 



It was club night at Barb and Chap's 
(should be in a magazine) Hanson home 
and Barbara served her usual gourmet 
dessert. One of the desserts was a fruit 
pie with a combination of berries making 
it particularly delicious. You can use 
either fresh or frozen. 
Barbara's 3 
1 1/2 cups fresh 
frozen strawberries 
1 1/2 cups fresh or unsweetened 
frozen raspberries 

1 1/2 cups fresh or unsweetened 
frozen blueberries 
3 tablespoons com starch 
1/4 cup apple juice 
1 cup sugar 
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 



2 tablespoons unsalted butter (cut up) 

Either make the pastry or buy ready 
make pie crust. 

Mix together the berries, cornstarch 
and apple juice in a bowl. Let stand for 
15 minutes. Gently mix in sugar and 
cinnamon. 

Heat oven to 450 degree. After filling 
the bottom crust with the mixture, dot 
with the butter and put top crust on. 
Cover edges of the pie with aluiiiinum 
foil. Place on a cookie sheet and bake 
for 15 minutes and then reduce oven 
temperature to 350 degrees and bake for 
55 more minutes. (70 to 80 minutes if 
using frozen fruit) Barbara also served a 
delicious key lime pie. She got raves! 



Classical Concert Series 
Continues At Bethany 



The seventh season of 
Mid-Week Concerts at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, comer of Spear and 
Coddington Sts., continued 
Wednesday with a concert 
of classical music in the 
church sanctuary at noon 
featuring Priscilla Hallberg, 
violinist accompanied by 
Elizabeth Hodges on the 

P**"° PRISCILLA HALLBERG 

Dr. Hallberg, of Alberta, chestra for 26 years, work- 
Canada, is the daughter of ing with Arthur Fiedler, 
Elizabeth Hodges, choral John Williams and Keith 
director of the Wollaston Lockhart. 
Glee Club. Dr. Hallberg has She has toured Japan and 
been a member of the Bos- Korea with the Pops, as well 
ton Pops Esplanade Or- as accompanying 20 U.S. 




tours. She has appeared pro- 
fessionally as a Baroque 
violinist in New York, 
Boston, Texas and interna- 
tionally in Portugal. 

Other concerts scheduled 
at Bethany: 

• July 28, "Woods and 
Wire," a woodwind trio, 
will perform. The trio from 
the North Shore includes 
bassoonist Terry Myers; 
clarinetist Bill Kirkel and 
oboist Audrey Markowitz. 

• Aug. 4, "The North 
River Trio," featuring 
Carolyn Curtis, pianist; 
Donna Cully, violinist; and 
Jane Hallet, cellist. 



Dilemma In Toy Department 
At Children's Theatre Friday 



Give. 



American Heart 
Association^ 



« 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



Diane Purdy's Children's Qu'ncy Center. 
Theatre Workshop will pre- Tickets are $7 at 
sent "Dilemma In The Toy 



Department" Friday at 7 
p.m. at the Woodward 
School, 1102 Hancock St., 



the 
door, and $5 in advance, for 
children under 12 and for 
senior citizens. 

For more information 
call 472-9233. 



Storyteller Ellen Block 
At Adams Shore Library 



The 13th season of the 
Summer Storytellers Series 
continue with Storyteller 
Ellen Block Tuesday, July 
27 at 7 p.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library 519 
Sea St. 

Block, a Quincy favorite, 
blends contemporary and 
traditional stories from 
China, Africa, Scotland and 
the Native American Indi- 
ans. She interweaves chants, 
movement and song into her 
stories to encourage audi- 
ence participation. She often 
ends her program with a 
folk song accompanied by 
her colorful collection of 
Appalachian lumberjacks. 
This is a program for fami- 
lies with children ages 5 and 
older. 

At the same time a Pa- 
jama Time Storyhour with 
Dottie Moynihan will be 
offered for younger siblings 
accompanied by an adult 
and families with children 
under the age of five. 
"Curious Cats" is the theme 
for this week. Jack Gantos' 
"Rotten Ralph" leads the 
cast of feline characters in 
this weeks* stories. 




ELLEN BLOCK 



Merrymount Student Top 

Winner In Houghs Neck Legion 

Flag Day Essay Contest 



Flag Day essay contest 
winners announced by 
Houghs Neck Legion Post. 

For the past 25 years 





Timcoe, founder of the words with my hand over 

program, and Carole my heart, I stare at our 

Gardner of the Auxiliary. country's flag and ask 
The first place winning myself what the flag 
the Houghs Neck Post, the essay by Alex Mendez of means to me. When I see 
Sons of the American Merrymount School: the red, I remember all the 

Legion and the Auxiliary "Our Country Our Flag" blood that was shed to 
have conducted an essay "One day 223 years ago keep this country free, 
contest for the fifth grade in May or June of 1776, Once I glimpse at the 
students at Atherton three of our country's 

patriots were asked to 

design our country's flag. 

Those three men's names 

were Robert Morris, 
Hough, Vanny Trieu of Colonel George Ross, and come to this great country 
Snug Harbor and the country's first for equality and liberty. 

president, George 

Washington. They found a 

well-known seamstress 

named Betsy Ross. She 

followed the design that 

George Washington and 
the other two men made. 
Betsy Ross liked the 



Hough, Snug Harbor and 
Merrymount Schools. 

This year's winners are 
David Casey of Atherton 



blue, I realize how 
trustworthy this country is. 
I think the white 
symbolizes the land of the 
free, and how anyone can 



Alexander Mendez of 
Merrymount. Awards were 
presented by Commander 
Clarence Gogan, Senior 
Vice Commander Mary 



CLiffoxd i 

• Elegant Designs 

• Gift Baskets 

• Roses Our Specialty 

1-800-441-8884 

Worldwide Delivery 

479-8884 

1229 HANCOCK ST., 

QUINCY, MA 02169 



Mention this ad 

andrecewea 

15% discount 

on your 

wedding flowers 



FLORISTS 



FLOWERS by HELEN 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



JEWELRY 



l^0L50n F'ne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The ColettI Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 786-7942 

Handicapped Accessible 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 
761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

773-7620 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



Ptiotograptiy 

^^ Studio 

679 Hancock ^rMt, Quincy 



(Wollaston) 



"During the Civil War 
men had to hold the battle 
flags. The men that held 
the flags had no guns or 
any sort of defence. I've 
heard a few stories of men 
getting their arms shot off 
by cannon balls while 
design, but she changed holding the flag. I don't 
all the six-pointed stars to know about you, but I 
five-pointed stars. The flag think that is pure courage 
was approved by the and loyalty to their 
Continental Congress in country. 
Philadelphia on June 14, "I enjoy looking at the 

1777. That is why Flag red, white and blue every 
Day is celebrated on the morning in school. I'm 
14th of June. That was a proud to live in this great 
summary of our nation's country and to have a flag 
fine flag's history. so beautiful. I hope you 

"Every day when I say enjoyed reading this essay 
the Pledge of Allegiance and have a Happy Flag 
in class, when I say those Day!" 

St. John's Parish 
Cookout On Aug. 15 

St. John the Baptist annual parish cookout from 
Church's family liturgy noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, 



committee will hold its third 



LIVERY 




KERRI LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

LIMOUSINES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
6-A PasMnger Strttcfa Limoiuiiiei • Town Can • Van* - Specialty Vehicfet 
Wcddi^ • ProM • )teimimi • Ni^ Out 
_^BabvAnivali * CaKcm • Aipat • SpccidiOccMnH 

6 1 7-472- 1118 Fax: 6 1 7-479-0288 




Give. 



American Heart 
AKodationJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR UFE 



Aug. 15, at the church on 
School Street. 

There will be Disney 
radio, games, raffles, 
clowns, f9Ce-painting and 
fun for aU. 

Food^ill be offered sale; 
a dollar will buy a ham- 
burg^ir or hcM dog plus chips 
and d beverage. 

/. 



J 



TlMHndaj,Ja|y22,1999 ThmQaLaay 



Pir7 



SCCIAI- 



•*r 




f * 




Sarah Houghton Selected 
For Marjot Foundation Award 



Sarah Houghton, a senior 
at North Quincy High 
School this fall, has been 
selected for the 1999 Marjot 
Foundation Award. 

The $2000 grant will 
allow her to continue 
working on her aquatic toxi- 
cology project. Using a mi- 
croscope, hematopoietic 
neoplasia or clam leukemia 
can be detected by drawing 
clam blood and staining the 
cells. Sarah found evidence 
of the leukemia and decided 
to find out if water salinity 
affected the prevalence of 
the disease in clams. 

Sarah has visited Woods 



Hole Oceanographic Insti- 
tute twice and continued e- 
mail correspondence with 
Dr. Carol L. Reinisch, a 
researcher and President of 
the Marjot Foundation. Un- 
der the direction of Mrs. 
Mary Young, Science De- 
partment head at North 
Quincy High, she will con- 
tinue Phase II of her project 
that earned her a first place 
finish at the N.Q.H.S. Sci- 
ence Fair, a first place finish 
at the South Sectional Sci- 
ence Fair, and a second 
place finish in the State Sci- 
ence Fair at M.I.T. 



Amy Parsons Selected 
For Students 'Who's Who' 



LUCIE THERRIEN 



Recording Artist 

Concert On Library 

Lawn July 29 



MR. and MRS. CHARLES MICHAELS 

(Ralph J. Shuman, Photography) 

Sharon Goodman Wed 
To Charles Michaels 



Amy L. Parsons of 
Quincy has been selected 
for "Who's Who Among 
Students in American Uni- 
versities and Colleges." 

A student at St. Mi- 
chael's College, Vermont, 
she is the daughter of Mr. 



and Mrs. Stephen Parsons. 

The honor is awarded to 
students who display out- 
standing achievements 
scholastically and partici- 
pate and ex ;rcise leadership 
in extracunicular activities. 



Recording and video 
artist, Lucie Therrien, brings 
music in French and in 
English Thursday, July 29, 
from 12:30 to 1:30 on the 
front lawn of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library in 
Quincy Square. 

The program is sup- 
ported in part by a grant 
from the Quincy Cultural 
Council, a local agency 
supported by the Massachu- 
setts Cultural Council and 
the Friends of the Library. 

As a solo act Therrien 
accompanies herself on the 
guitar. Her repertoire in- 
cludes traditional, contem- 
porary and original songs 
that reflect the culture of 
French speaking people in 
Quebec, Acadia, New Eng- 
land, Louisiana, France and 
Creole areas. 

Jill Fishman 
On Dean's List 

Jill Fishman of Quincy, 
was named to the dean's list 
for the spring semester at 
Brandeis University in 
Waltham. 

Miss Fishman, class of 
2001, is the daughter of Ste- 
phen and Mary Lou Fish- 
man. 



In addition to being a 
performer, she is a certifled 
teacher, composer, linguist, 
historian and public speaker. 
She has performed through- 
out the United States, 
France and Quebec and has 
participated in cultural ex- 
changes in Martinique and 
North Africa. She has pub- 
lished 12 recordings, several 
books and videos. 

New England folk singer, 
Jim Douglas, concludes the 
series Aug 5 with a concert 
of traditional and contempo- 
rary folk songs. 

Concertgoers are wel- 
come to bring picnics, lawn 
chairs, sun shades. Concerts 
will be held at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea Street, in case of in- 
clement weather. They are 
free and accessible. 



At a recent wedding 
ceremony in Brcfokline, 
Sharon Rosalie Goodman 
became the bride of 
Charles Philip Michaels. 

The bride is the 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Carl Goodman of Quincy. 
The groom is the son of 
Richard Michaels of 
Larchmont, N.Y., and 
Suzanne Deschamplain of 



Trenton, Fla. 

The bride is a graduate 
of Syracuse University and 
is employed by ABC 
Radio Network. The groom 
is a graduate of the 
University of Miami, 
Florida. 

After a wedding trip to 
San Juan, Puerto Rico, the 
couple are living in 
Orlando, Fla. 



Meghan Barry Graduates Assumption 

Meghan Barry, daughter graduated from Assumption 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert College in Worcester with a 
Barry of Quincy, recently degree in political science. 



Ai. 



Oh) 



3 Residents Receive 
Westfield Degrees 



Three Quincy residents 
received degrees from, 
Westfield State College. 

They are: 

Steven Barrett of 17 
Clifton St., Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Criminal Justice. 

Matthew Miller of 875 
Sea St., Bachelor of Science 
in Criminal Justice. 

Brendan Welch of 165 
Arlington St., Bachelor of 
Science in Criminal Justice. 



LITTUE WILLOWS 
PRESCHOOL-5^ 

77«173 i^ 






SUAAMERFUM 

2'4irMkP/T8«Mlont. 

2 and 3 Day Programs 

U«MiMd SMTbig/SiMll Group* 

ALSO ACCEPTING FALL 

RCGISTfUTIONS 

Wodity ThoniM, FMd THpt. 

CriMs,PiUnllng,«MlFunl 

Our currfcuimn to dMignad wMt your 
Vtry Importwjl ProBchodw in mind 

50 Willow St -WoUaslon 




at the 



, IVst 



Adams Inn 



29 Hancock St.. North Quincy. MA 02171 

617-326-0269 

"Enjoy Poolsidc Service v(/ith a Smile and a Sunset" 

Steaks, bba Chicken. Ka-bobs & Morel 

Open 7 days for Lunch & Pinner 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Wed.. July 21 - Mark and Sheila 

Thurs.. July 22 - Brook Street 3and 

FrI., July 23 - Tony VIscontI 

Sat.. July 24 - Joe Lundbohm 



Y ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St, 
Quincy, MA 02169 




479-16S2 

QmpUtt Lmt ofSitpflies 
Frtt Estimates 



ts i 

J 



Crown 
Royal 
Bakery 

Wedding & Birthday Cakes 
Chinese Pastry & Breads 

Open 7 Days 
7am - 7pm 

617-376-8889 

299 Newport Ave. 
Wollaston, MA 02170 



The HOTTEST 

Summer Looks... 
Styles That 

SIZZLE! 




Women's Hair Cuts stuttlngQt^^^, 
Monday S|>ecial stittlngtL 
Euro|>ean Color ettttlng 9t. 

\^oi\s Stfttihg 9t„ 

Highlights stfttlng 9t,^^-——.» 

Perms (inetwffng cut) st9ttlng 9h. 

Make-over /T/m mtk^om with « tSO.00 tnaka-up puithv)^ 



w »••••♦■•■»••»•»♦«»♦»»»»»»♦»»—»#< 



Tuesday & Thursday Sfiecials stttting at,,,,,.,^ t12°° 

BHtttl Ptckagas Avtllubh • Also fututing « Ml eatvfea rail dNIskm 
Wa eatfy 9 Ml 11 tw Of holt C9ta ^odoets 



KMS, 





HrvMtmk. 



>C wi 



AVEDA 




; If 



.^i 



¥•«>•• »♦*•»« •ir%»»#VH,» ««#<li **W« *•?•• -•I»l~f.»-. 



Pages Tlk* Qulncy Sua Thunday, July 22, 1999 



Greg Glennon Installed ^^''^y intervention Director Retires 

Lions Club President 200 Celebrate 30- Year 

Career Of Phyllis Fazzio 



Greg Glennon was 
installed as president and 
King Lion of the Quincy 
Lions Club at its recent 
59th installation of officers 
at the Quincy 

Neighborhood Club. 

He succeeds Steven 
Mansfield who presided at 
the meeting. Past 
President John Reed was 
program chairman. 

Other officers installed 
were: 

Tom Zukauskas, first 
vice-president; John 
Pickering, second vice- 
president; Christine 
Cedrone, third vice- 
president; David Kale, 
secretary; Michelle Lydon, 
treasurer; Ailina 

McNamara, lion tamer and 
Frank McCauley, tail 
twister. 

Ken Anderson, Vin 
Moscardelli, Jim Flaherty, 
Vin Sullivan and Joanne 
Condon-Walsh were 
installed directors for two 
years. Janet Lydon, 
Suzanne O'Neil, Shawn 
Sheehan, Helen Murphy 
an Mary O'Neil will Serve 
as directors for one year. 



Life Membership 
Awards were presented to 
Roger Hamel and Don 
Uvanitte. Uvanitte also 
received the Lion of the 
year Award. 

Francis X. McCauley 
and Dr. James Will, two 
long-time members of the 
club received plaques 
naming them Melvin Jones 
Fellows. This fellowship 
which honors Melvin 
Jones, the founder of Lions 
International, is given for 
"dedicated humanitarian 
service" and is the 
"highest form of 
recognition conferred by 
the Lions International 
Foundation." 

Uncle Sam Rounseville 
was made an honorary 
member of the club for his 
work in raising funds for 
eye research and patient 
care. 

The Quincy Lions Club, 
chartered in 1941, has 
raised thousands of dollars 
for eye research programs 
and provides scholarships 
for area high school 
graduates. 



Danny Chao Receives 
Northeastern Award 



Danny J. Gao, son of 
Chao Gao, of East Squan- 
tum St., North Quincy, was 
presented the Pratt Award 
during a Northeastern Uni- 
versity awards banquet. 

Gao studied management 
information systems and 



We need you. 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



finance at Northeastern and 
is a graduate of the class of 
1999. 

The Paul M. Pratt Award 
was established in 1992 
upon the retirement of Dean 
Pratt, after 30 years of 
service to the Department of 
Cooperative Education. The 
award recognizes one senior 
who has demonstrated ex- 
ceptional personal and pro- 
fessional growth through the 
cooperative education pro- 
gram. 



Sen. Michael Morrissey 
and other community lead- 
ers recently joined South 
Shore Mental Health staff 
and guests in celebrating the 
30-year career of Phyllis 
Fazzio, director of Step One 
Early Intervention, with a 
retirement party at the 
Neighborhood Club. 

"I've never seen anyone 
who was more gracious in 
her acceptance of all the 
love and appreciation from 
the decades of families and 
children Phyllis has helped," 
said Rosemary Wahlberg, 
executive director of Quincy 
Community Action Pro- 
gram. Wahlberg was one of 
14 individuals to take the 
podium before approxi- 
mately 200 guests to share 
their experience with Faz- 
zio. 

Fazzio joined SSMH in 
1969 as a teacher of chil- 
dren with multiple disabili- 
ties. She has served as di- 
rector of the agency's Step 
One Early Intervention pro- 
gram since 1989. 

Step Onei is a program of 
South Shore Mental Health, 
and is sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health which 
helps parents to recognize 

and understand their child's 
developmental needs, and 
suggests ways to help their 
child grow. The program 
serves infants and children 
up to three years old who 
are at risk for developmental 
delays due to biological or 
environmental stressors. 

During the 10 years Faz- 
zio served as director, Step 
One has expanded from 
serving 85 South Shore 
families to 265. 



Call About Our Move In Special 



*Z^ivER 'Bay Club 

♦ 

...a retirement community that won't cramp your 
style, your furniture or your pockethook. 



Who says moving to a retirement 
community means giving up 
space? At River Bay Club, you can 
select from a variety of spacious 
apartment plans. Every style is 
fully equipped with everything 
you need. There are no endow- 
ment fees, and the monthly rates 
are very affordable. 



Come see what you're missing at River Bay Club 
For more information or to schedule a personal tour please call: 

617-472-4457 

River Bay Club provides equal opportunities to all individuals 62 years of age or older Q. 

G Please send me information on River Bay Qub 
G Please contact me to arrange a personal tour 



"Phyllis's extraordinary 
commitment to improving 
the lives of families in need 
has been the hallmark of her 
long career," said Harry 
Shulman, preisident and 
CEO of SSMH. 

Indeed, parents and 
grown children representing 
three decades of Step One 
clients shared emotional 
testimonies of developing 
strategies to better cope with 
developmental delays. With 
tears in her eyes, Andrea 
White of Quincy recalled 
how Phyllis and her staff 
had suggested that her son 
Roger had Pervasive Devel- 
opmental Disorder, a condi- 
tion related to autism. A 
neurologist's diagnosis con- 
firmed the condition. 

"Phyllis and her staff 
made home visits and 
helped the whole family to 
learn what Roger needed 
and what to expect from 
him at different stages of 
development," Andrea said. 
"They also taught me how 
to advocate for his needs." 

Although Roger has no 
language skills when he 
entered the program at 17 
months old, he graduated 
with the ability to form ba- 
sic words and sounds. An- 
drea also felt her son was 
able to develop a higher 
degree of social skills 
through group interaction 
and music therapy classes. 

During the ceremony. 
Step One staff presented 
Fazzio with a 120-inch by 
96-inch quilt with colorful 
panels created by both staff 
members and clients' fami- 
lies. 

Fazzio serves as co- 
president of the Massachu- 
setts Early Intervention 
Consortium, and is a board 
member of Manet Commu- 




ANDREA WHITE Oeft) presents Phyllis Faido with a 
Senate citation sponsored by Sen. Michael Morrissey in 
recognition for her outstanding work with children and 
fiumilics receiving early hitervention services. 



nity Health Center. She is 
also a member of the 
Quincy Early Childhood 
!!\dvisory Committee and 
Impact Quincy's Early 
Childhood Committee. 

In 1997, she was the re- 
cipient of the Rosemary 
Wahlberg Award presented 
by South Shore Day Care 
Services for her work with 
families. Over the years she 
was been active in numer- 
ous lobbying and advocacy 
efforts on behalf of early 
intervention programs at 
both the local and state lev- 
els. 



"When Phyllis and I 
were on our way to the State 
House in May to rally for 
children in need of services, 
she complained she couldn't 
walk up the hill as quickly 
as she used to," said Rose- 
marie Sergi, assistant di- 
rector of Step One. "When I 
commented on the changes 
30 years bring, she laughed 
and said she forgets she's 
not as young as she used to 
be. 

"Regardless, Phyllis has 
managed to maintain a sense 
of youthfulness, hope and 
vigor in her work." 



11 Residents On 
B.U. Dean's List 



Eleven Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
dean's list at Boston 
University for the spring 
semester. 

They are: 

Michael J. Chase, Julie 



M. Donovan, Ashkan 
Hedvat, Wai Y. Lau, 
Matthew S. Lebo, Wendy 
Y. Li, Benny Ma, Brian F. 
McFarland, Maribeth 
Naples, Patricia L. Wilk, 
and Yun W. Yu. 




Name: _ 
Address: 
City: _ 



State: 



Phone: _ 
Zip Code: 



QS0699 



Mail to: River Bay Qub, 99 Brackett Street, Quincy, MA 02 169 ^ 




Ejgere Trioinas 

$AL€N 



^ait dolor /Kodd (Zalli 

Wter: Ajgjst 2, 9ain cr Ipin 

f cr yej ! A free Hair Celer 
by €jr cclcr tecliriciars. 

f er iJs : A day ef edjcatier 
ir adyarced cclcrirg, 
ir ar crgclrg eyer / 
c^a^gi^g irdjstry. / 
Please call fcr an ai)p€lri|tnert 

1459 HANcock Street, Ouircy Center • 67-479-8887 

Op€N MondAy 9AM-5pM, TuEsdAy-pRidAy 9am-8pm, SAiftidAy 8:?0am-?pm 



TlMnday,J«ly22,1999 ThmQuiMtay 



Piiftt 



Committee Members Announced 

Marie Curry Walk For Cancer Sept. 19 



The Mayor's Commis- 
sion on the Status of 
Women and the Quincy 
Hospital Health A Educa- 
tion Foundation announce 
the second annual Marie 
Curry Walk will be held 
Sunday, Sept. 19, in Quincy. 

Last year, 500 siq)porters 
participated in the Marie 
Curry Walk raising nearly 
$90,000 to provide free 
mammo^phy screenings at 
Quincy Hospital. 

Citizens Bank and 
Quarry Hills Associates are 
co-sponsoring the S-mile (8- 
kilometer) walk along 
Quincy Shore Drive. Regis- 
tration begins at Quincy 
City Hall, 1305 Hancock 
St., at 8 a.m. and the walk 
starts at 9:30 a.m. A recep- 
tion will follow at The 
Summer House at Marina 
Bay. 

Individuals, families and 
friends will joint together to 
participate in this one day, 
non-competitive event to 
raise money for the Marie 
A. Curry Fund, which has 
already provided more than 
200 free mammograms at 
Quincy Hospital for indi- 
viduals without insurance. 
The walk helps raise aware- 
ness about the early detec- 
tion of breast cancer detec- 
tion and in the future, the 
Fund is looking to expand 
services to individuals 
needing cancer-related 
services. 

The Mayor's Commis- 



sion on the Status of 
Women and the Quincy 
Hospital Health A Educa- 
tion Foundation also an- 
nounce the committee for 
the Marie Curry Walk. 

Mayor James Sheets is 
honorary chairman of the 
walk and the Curry family, 
Robert, Cheryle, Julie, Sean 
and Tara are co-chairing the 
event. 

Members of the walk 
committee include all of the 
former mayors' wives: Pa- 
trician Hannon, Louise 
LaRaia, Sandra McCauley, 
Sheila Mclntyre, Shirley 
Tobin, and current First 
Lady Joann Sheets. 

The committee also in- 
cludes members of the 
Mayor's Commission on the 
Status of Women: Maureen 
Ayers, Nancy Callanan, 
Karen Donnellan, Judith 
Farmer, Lois Ferrazzi, Jean 




THE MARIE CURRY Walk Committee is planning tUs 

year's walk on Sept 19. Committee members attending a 

recent general meeting are, seated from left: Gloria Noble, 

Lei" M Mr ■ Maralin Manning, Jean Parker, Joanne Nelson, Julie Curry 

Mary Lou MeighM, Pauline ning, Joanne Nelson, Robert mD, Maryrosc Mirick, Judy 

c- gjjj Gloria Noble, John Morris and Jean Parker. 
Noonan, Claudia Ras- 
mussen, and Susan Rossini. 

Quincy Hospital repre- 
sentatives are: Renee Buis- 
son, Tamara Erdley, 
Amanda Le, Delphine Lui, 



Petipas, Susan Ramey, Sr. 
Joanne Westwater, and Bar- 
bara Wood. 

Community representa- 
tives on the walk committee 
are: Terry Bellotti- Welch, 
Marti Cami, Maralin Man- 



and Cheryle Curry. Standing, Renee Buisson, Tamara 
Erdley, Nancy Callanan, Judy Morris, Tom Timcoc, 
BarlMira Wood, Maryrosc Mirick, Lois Ferrazzi, Karen 
Donnellan, Maureen Magulre, Marylou Meighan, Bob 
Noble, Jean Leslie and Patricia Hannon. 

For more information or for a walk sponsor sheet, 
about becoming a sponsor call (617) 376-5495. 



Ralph DiMattia Receives 
Maritime Academy Degree 

Cadet Ralph J. DiMattia in Maritime Transportation. 



of Quincy graduated from 
the Massachusetts Maritime 

Academy at Buzzard's Bay. 
He earned a B.S. degree 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 





BREAKFAST 

7 days a week 

all day 



Early American Restaurant 

Since 1988 
1054 Hancock Street, Quincy • 328-8225 

Open Daily at 7am 
HOUSE SPECIALTY - Our Famous Homemade Corned Beef Hash 



Sullivan's Corner 

716 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY • (617)471-6086 

After 20 years, we're going out of the retail business! 

"Everything Must Go" Sales!! 

Thursday & Friday, July 22 & 23 - 40% OFF! 
Saturday July 24 -50% OFF! 

Mahogany Breakfronts, Oak Sideboard, Round Table, Mahogany Governor Winthrop Desk, 

Dining Tables & Chairs, Bedroom Furniture, Lamps, Paintings, Prints, Mirrors, Royal 

Doultons, Hummels, Sebastian Miniatures, Sterling, China, Glass, Rugs 

Open 10:00 -5:30 



Also: IN-STORE AUCTION SALE! 

Tuesday, July 27, 1999 
Preview 4:00 -6:30 Auction 6:30 

WeVe digging out all sorts of items from back rooms & cellars 

Old locks, toys, games, iron & wooden wares, fbrniture, furniture parts, hardware, 

lamps & lamp parts, paintings, prints, mirrors, display cases, storage units, counter top 

refrigerator, microwave, pieces of marble, many large lots of china, glass and bric-a-brac.l 



Page 10 Him Quiaoy Sun Thunday, July 22, 1999 





CHILDREN'S CHOO-CHOO rolls down the middle of Hancock St Friday aflemoon 
with its young passengers aboard. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Robert NobU) 



mSN*T OFTEN yon CM stand and rit in the nyddic of Haocodi St but you could dwfag 
the Sidewalk Fcstiyal with the street doaed to traffic These fwopic arc listening to The 
Darlings country western group Iliursday night 

(Qumcy Sun Photo/ Robert NoNe) 



Despite Torrid Heat Sidewalk Festival A Success 



(Cont'd from page I) 

experienced. We see how 
much people in Quincy and 
the outlying areas enjoy it 
and want to be part of it," 
she said. 

"Already, we're gearing 
up for next year, our 30th, 
for something bigger and 
better." 

She said the heat always 
is a factor during the side- 
walk festival. "But people 
are used to it and look for- 
ward to the event. It's the 
same the same temperature 
every year. It's guaranteed 
for 90 degree weather. 

"People get into a festive 
mood, and the festival is a 
way for the merchants to 



repay the people for their 
patronage," Gazarian said. 

The festival is privately 
funded by QCBPA, and the 
through the association dues 
and the generous sponsor- 
ship of local businesses, 
they can present the enter- 
tainment, she added. 

"From what I could see 
and hear, the first couple of 
days, especially Thursday, 
people were spending and 
enjoying themselves," said 
Stephen Blumberg of Ste- 
phen Leigh Jewelry. "But 
the heat had an overall ef- 
fect on the turnout; some 
didn't show up on Saturday 

because of the heat," he 
said. 



He said there was a lot of 
interest in his treasure chest 
outside the store which was 
filled with plush stuffed 
animals, including dozens of 
Beanie Babies provided by 
Stephen Leigh Jewelers and 
other merchants. 

"For $2, people could put 
their hand into a beautiful 
trunk, and after a certain 
amount of time, pull out a 
stuffed animal. Whatever 
they pulled out they could 
keep. We had a lot of fun." 

The money went to sup- 
port the downtown business 
association, he said. An- 
other attraction that raised 
money for QCBPA was the 
picture stand. Manning and 



Watts built backdrops with 
head cutouts for people to 
pose in. 

The store also sold 
Monadnock Mountain 
Spring Water, which is 
based in Quincy, and soda. 

Blumberg said a dona- 
tion from Harbor Express 
provided a children's read- 
ing hour. Debbie Pizzi, a 
Quincy teacher, and 
Meghan Malone, a Hanover 
librarian, read to the young- 
sters while their parents 
browsed along Hancock 
Street.. 

Charlie Ryder of Ryder's 
Curtains said his store did 
well during the three-day 



event. Although he had 
fewer transactions, the store 
did more business.. 

"We sold lots of bath 
towels, hand towels and 
kitchen towels and a lot of 
lace curtains. I was kind of 
surprised about the cur- 
tains," he said, adding that it 
was too hot to shop on Sat- 
urday. 

Josephine Consoli, wife 
of Guy Consoli of Napoli's, 
said the festival "was a lot 
of woric. 

"People would buy pizza 
outside, and then come in- 
side to the air conditioning 
to eat." 

"It was a terrific event," 
said Renee Buisson of 



Quincy City Hospital's 
public relations staff. The 
Quincy Visiting Nurse As- 
sociation provided free 
blood pressure screenings 
for part of each day. 

Quincy 's Records and 
Tapes' manager Dave De- 
meo said business was very 
good. "We did very well. 
We were a little surprised, 
considering the Kennedy 
death and the heat. 

"I thought people would 
stay home and watch TV, 
the temperature was so hot," 
he said, "but people came in 
and bought CX>s, videos and 
a few cassettes. We had a 
good selection." 




CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT Peter Kelson (fourth from left) cuts the ribbon to open the 
Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival as acting mayor in the absence of Mayor James Sheets 
who was on vacation. Assisting from the left, are Councillors Paul Harold and Frank 
McCauley, Deanna Gazarian of Phase II Jewelry, president of the sponsoring Quincy 
Center Business and Professional Association, Ward 3 Councillor Patrick McDermott and 
Councillor Tim CahilL 

(Maralin Manning Photo) 







CLUSTER OF CLOWN'S MilUc Savage of Quincy performed Saturday much to the 
delight of children. (Maralin Manning Photo) 




AMERICAN BEAUTY conriw HvcMd Ihtafi "P Saturday aflcraooa. 

(Maralin Manning photo) 




MICHAEL SPENCER, S, or SMrth QiriMy ta tal !■ the 
Hauon of St Moritz StiMes, West Qaimcj. 



on poay Taried by MBk 

(Qumcy Swi Photo/Robert ffoNe) 



Thunday, July 22, 1999 Thm Qulnoy 0iw Page 1 1 



Quincy 2000 Helps 

Shea Corian Fabrication 

Firm Buy New Equipment 



*•• 



Quincy 2000 has 
stepped in to help Bill 
Shea's Corian Center, a 
fast growing countertop 
fabrication company 
purchase needed 

machinery, 

"This is another 
example of our continuing 
efforts to keep 
manufacturing, alive and 
well in Quincy," said 
Quincy 2000 Executive 
Director Joseph 

Mannarino. 

Bill Shea's Corian 
Center, 809 Hancock St., a 
third generation company, 
is one of the region's 
leading fabricators of 
Dupont Corian products. 

The firm's fabrication 
facility is on Lebanon St. 
in Quincy Point. 

The new equipment will 
enable the company to 
hire and train six new 
employees at the Quincy 
Point facility. 

Mannarino noted that 
Quincy 2000, through its 
Industrial Needs 

Assessment outreach 
program, has contacted 
industrial businesses 
throughout the city to stem 
the loss of jobs over the 
past decade. 

WiUiamC. Shea of BUI 
Shea's Corian Center 
expressed enthusiasm 
about the Quincy 2000 
outreach program. 

"Corian has eclipsed 
kitchen cabinets and 
Formica countertops as our 
main products," he said. 

Local 
Invited To 

The American Institute 
for Foreign Study is offering 
Quincy area high school 
students an opportunity to 
study and travel abroad and 
earn scholarship money to- 
wards their trip by hosting 
an Academy Year in Amer- 
ica (AY A) high school ex- 
change student arriving in 
August. 

AYA is sponsored by the 
American Institute for For- 
eign Study (AIFS) Founda- 
tion. The not-for-profit 
Foundation promotes inter- 
cultural exchange by ^wn- 
soring high school exchange 
students from around the 
world to live with American 
families and study at local 
high schools for 5 or 10 
months. 

Families who host an 
AYA exchange student y/ith 
good English skills and nK>- 
tivation can learn about the 
country* its custcHns, culture 
and language. Most impor- 
tantly, if the American stu- 
dent decides to studyAnvel 
abroad, the family and stu- 
dent will have made a spe- 
ckl friend in the country 
before he or she begins h^ 
or her adventure. 

Quincy families can earn 
up to $1,000 towante study 
abroMl {Mograms in Fnmce, 
Germany, the Netherlands 



"However, Corian 
requires new fabrication 
techniques that require 
expensive and 

sophisticated machinery. 

"We were in dire need 
of updating our equipment 
and increasing the size of 
our workforce to meet the 
demands of our customers. 

"Fortunately, Quincy 
2000 has put its shoulder 
to the wheel with us and in 
doing so has not only 
ensured that we have the 
tools to meet our current 
demands, but now we 
know we have the 
machinery and capacity to 
sustain our growth plans." 

Mannarino said: 

"Quincy 2000 is pleased 
to have the funding 
available to assist a 
growing company like Bill 
Shea's Corian Center in 
modernizing its 

manufacturing equipment. 

"The assistance we've 
provided helps Shea's 
meet their growth plans 
and create new jobs in the 
manufacturing sector, a 
component of our local 
economy that has 
dwindled in size over the 
years." 

Ward 2 Councillor 
Daniel Raymondi in whose 
ward the fabrication 
facility is located said: 

"Quincy is fortunate to 
have the kind of public- 
private partnership in 
Quincy 2000 that can 
provide resources for 
businesses that stimulate 
job creation. 



"I am very pleased that 
through the efforts of 
Quincy 2000, Bill Shea's 
Corian Center will be able 
to hire and train six new 
employees. 

"Quincy 2000 also 
encouraged the company 
to make some physical 
improvements to the 
Lebanon St. facility that 
contribute to our overall 
revitalization efforts in the 
Quincy Point community." 

The Shea company was 
founded in 1952 by 
William T. Shea and his 
son, William F. Shea, the 
Hrst retail business to sell 
Formica. 

The company is still 
family run by William F. 
Shea and his son, William 
C. Shea. 

"However," said the 
latter, "the company is 
now promoting Dupont 
Corian rather than 
Formica. Corian gives you 
more choices and 
flexibility than any other 
surface material you can 
buy today." 

Quincy 20O0's Job 
creation funding comes 
from the federal 
Department of Housing 
and Urban Development's 
Community Development 
Block Grant Prograni. 

In exchange for the 
funding, businesses 
commit to creating job 
opportunities for low and 
moderate-income persons. 

For more information 
about the program, contact 
Quincy 2000 at 617-847- 
1454. 




nNANClAL ASSISTANCE FROM Quincy 2000 caablcd BUI Shea's Corian Center to 
purchase new Esachlacry and hire six mmrt employees. From the left at a prcscntatioD at tlie 
firm's Quincy Point hbrication hdlity arc, Ward 2 Couadilor Daniel Raymoodi, WiUiam F. 
Shea and William C. Shea of the Shea company; Executive Director Joseph Mannarino, Ann 
Fisher and Michael Rie of Quincy 2000. 



High School Students 
Travel And Study Abroad 

and Spain, or earn up to by hosting an AYA student 

$500 on summer or winter this August, 

travel/study programs to For roorc information, 

Austria, Brazil, Chile, call Andrea at 10800-322- 

France, Spain or Germany ^78 ext. 6078. 



TTiinfiing aSout your future? 



Master of Education 

& Teacher Certification 

• Early Childhood Education 

• Elementary Education 

• Middle School Education 

• Teaching of ESL 

• Music Education 

• Physical Education 

• Secondary Education 

• Special Needs Education 




Master of Science 
Marriage & Family 
Therapy 
Cohort Program 
Two evenings per weeic 
Leads to licensure 




^Eastern !Nazarene College 
23 East Elm Avenue • Quincy, MA •02170 




617-745-3557 



www.enc.edu 



Want to avoid checking fees 



en in 
iiincy 

(It Granite 
Crossing! 



Direct Cheddi^ 
means direct s^ngs. 



Avoiding checking fees is easy. Simply direct yourself to 
South Shore Savings Bank and arrange for direct deposit of your 
paycheck, social security check, or other regular payment to a 
Direct Checking Account. If s conveiiient . . . and a terrific value: 

To open your Direct 
decking Account, stop 
by any of our convenient 
kx:atk>ns or ^1 us today. 




NO monthly fee 



NO per check fees 



NO minimum balance 



Member F€MCX»F 



South Shore 

SAVINGS BANK 

A great community bank! 
(800) 660-7800 

East Bridgew^er • East Weymouth • Hanover/Norweil 

Nmth WeynxMJih • Quincy • South Weymouth 

Weymouth • Weymouth Landing 



Pigel2 TliimQuiiiioyBuxk Thnraday, Jwly 22, 1»9» 



One Gift The Same As Two 

Quincy Salvation Army 

^Double Your Donation' 

Fundraiser Underway 



For the next few weeks 
you can help the Salvation 
Army of Quincy with a 
donation that will double 
as soon as you make it. 

The matching fund 
"Double Your Donation" 
fundraiser is now underway 
and will continue through 
Aug. 15. 

From now until then, 
the Quincy Temple Corps, 
will be able to instantly 
double whatever money is 
donated. 

This is possible because 
of a generous matching 
grant obtained by the 
Quincy Corps, through the 
Salvations Army Eastern 
U.S. Headquarters in New 
York. 

Donations must be 
made by check or cash 
and be specifically 
earmarked for this 
matching fund. 

It is a one-time, short- 
term opportunity with 
donations received going 
to meet expenses 
associated with operating 
the Quincy Temple Corps. 

The Quincy Corps, has 
many programs that 

benefit residents of the 




MAJOR ED FORSTER 

area including a 
community center. Adult 
Day Health Programs for 

senior citizens, and a wide 
variety of social services 
such as as its food pantry 
and residential camping 
program for children. 

Commenting on the 
matching grant. Major Ed 
Forster, Quincy Corps, 
commanding officer, said: 

"This is unprecedented 
in my more than 30 years 
as an officer. It's a 
wonderful opportunity. I 
just wish we had more 
time to take advantage of 
it." 

The Salvation Army has 
been in Quincy more than 



100 years. Anthony 
Agnitti, chairman of the 
Quinqy Advisory , Board 
has noted: 

"The Salvation Army of 
Quincy has been an 
integral part of the Quincy 
community for the past 
100 years. It has constantly 
strived to be a positive 
vehicle to help and to 
guide individuals through 
bad times." 

Forster, expressing 
appreciation for past 
support and to those who 
can help during this period 
said: 

"The Army wants to 
thank everyone who has 
helped us in the past and 
we are grateful for those 
who will help us to meet 
the Aug. IS deadline for 
this double your donation 
opportunity." 

Checks should be made 
out to The Salvation Army 
and sent to: 

Salvation Army 
Quincy Temple 



Corps. 



02169 



Matching Fund 
6 Baxter St. 
Quincy, MA 




PLEASE HELP! 

We Need You ! 

Double your donation! 

Any gift you can give by 

Aug. 1 5 will be matched 

dollar for dollar 

Giving one is like giving two! 

Please make your donation payable to 
The Salvation Army and mail to: 

SALVATION ARMY 

QUINCY TEMPLE CORPS 

MATCHING FUND 

6 BAXTER ST. 
QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME: 



ADDRESS: 
CITY: 



My donation to the Salvation Army $ 



■ ■■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET, 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ]1 YEAR IN QUINCY $15.00 

[ ] I YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $17.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR, OUT OF STATE $20.00 [ ] PLEASE BILL ME 



341 On Honor Roll 
At North Quincy High 



North Quincy High 
School lists 341 students 
in the ninth, 10th and 11th 
grades on the fourth 
quarter honor roll. 

(The 12 grade honor 
students were announced 
and published earlier.) 

The ninth, 10th and 
11th grade honor roll 
students are: 

Distinction 

Grade 9: David 
Birmingham, Patrick Bregoli, 
George Camia, Philip Chan, 
Wan Chan, Winnie Chan, 
Cindy Chou, Albert Chow, 
Julie Cummings, Kahli 
Dearani, Minh Dean, Erin 
Downey, Allison Downs, 
Meghan Driscoll, Darcy Fay, 
Aaron Goodman, Alexander 
Gray, Caitlin Herlihy, Beth 
Houghton, Mary Joseph, 
Karan Khera, Allison Lacey, 
Angela Lam, Billy Lam, Lisa 
Lam, William Lee, Eric Liu, 
Elizabeth Lo, Jenny Lo, 
Patrick Losi, Andrei 
Mackenzie, Dennis Mackey, 
Katherine Markhard, Melissa 
Mastrorilli, Laura Matos, 
Philip McGillicuddy, 
Matthew Moy, Sue Moy, 
Jerry Mui, Jillian Mullen, 
Billy Ng, Lily Ng, Nhan 
Nguyen, Phuongly Nguyen, 
Son Nguyen, Yen Nguyen, 
Kelli Nogler, Adam O'Hara, 
Patrick Renzi, Timothy 
Renzi, Kelly Rice, Matthew 
Ryan, Michael Ryan, Patrick 
Ryder, Stephen Scchy, 
Jennifer Shi, Linda Sinclair, 
Lily Tarn, Leakhena Tan, 
Troy Tower, Noah Tubo, 
Charles Vidoli Jr. Ky Vu, 
Laura Wells, Choi Wong, 
Sarah Wong, William Wong, 
Daniel Wooster, Chung Ying, 
Jian Yu, Kevin Zhang, Yu 
Zhang. 

Grade 10: Charles Acton, 
Diana Ainsley, Rebecca 
Ballard, Natalie Barahona, 
Jeffrey Bartoloni, Ellen 
Blaney, Sheila Bohan, Elise 
Bowes, Brian Breslin, Roisin 
Callanan, Caitlin Calnan, 
Farhana Cannon, Megan 
Cassidy, Kevin Chan, Paul 
Chan, Peter Chan, Robert 
Chan, Calvin Chow, Margaret 
Chuong, Laura Clarke, 
Jennifer Conley, Catherine 
Constantine, Patrick 
Coughlin, Joseph Cronin, Lori 
DeLucia, Anh Doan, Kelly 



Doherty, Marhsall Doughty, 
Daniel Douglas, Sarah 
Dufrane, Jenny Eng, Xiawen 
Fang, Patrick Friel, Paul 
Garvey, Ryan Graeber, 
Andrea Hettman, Anh Ho, 
Vikki Ho, Hien Huynh, 
Christopher Johnson, Pauline 
Kam, Anne Kelly. Colleen 
Lahar, Patrick Lahar, Thi 
Lam, Vincent Lam, Ying 
Lam, Kai Lau, Rachel Lau, 
Susan Lee, Xia Lee, Jennifer 
Letham, Susanna Liu, 
Christine Look, Mayling Luc, 
Heather Lynch, Adam 
Maquis, Andrea Marshall, 
Gregory McGinness, Melissa 
McKenna, Samantha 
Mendez, Jacquelyn Murphy, 
Danny Ng, Daniel Ngo, Linda 
Nguyen, Marina Pereira, 
Matthew Petit, Nam Phan, 
Kyle Piazza, Merideth 
Power, Robert Rice, Camelia 
Saffarini, Hiu Sham, Brandon 
Sleeth, Hoi So, Wilson So, 
Ryan Stoeckel, Emily Szeto, 
Danny Tam, Jenny Tam, 
Peter Tam, Vicki Tang, Luan 
Tran, Baongoc Trannguyen, 
Sarah Wilson, Lisa Wong, 
Wendy Wong, Wendy Wong, 
Janet Yankun, Robyn Yee, 
Bonita Yip, Matthew Yohe, 
Yan Yu, Gordon Zeng. 

Grade 11: Angela 
Andronico, Jessica Barbeau, 
David Browne, Dianna Chan, 
Rebecca Chan, Siu-Kin 
Chan, Betty Cheng, Amy 
Cheung, Candy Cheung, Eric 
Chow, Florence Chow, Lisa 
Chow, David Constantine, 
Kristin Coughlin, Nancy 
Dinsmore, Justin Drysdale, 
Rita El Hachem, Rebecca 
Favorite, Eric Foley, Alayna 
Henck, Janelle Hersey, Sarah 
Houghton, Pic Hung, 
Christine Kurpeski, Shirley 
Kwok, Edward Lau, Elizabeth 
Leuchte, Sally Leung, Erica 
Limoncelli, Kelly Mackey, 
James Mateu, Lili Moy, 

Ashley Murphy, Matthew 
O'Connell, Mikel Panajoti, 
Lauren Pizzi, Sarah Price, 
Kevin Shea, Eric Suen, 
Jeffrey Tam, Ellen Tang, 
Donna Thach, Tridac Tran, 
Ellen Trung, Jason Tubo, 
Christopher Walsh, Cbeuk 
Wan, Kellie Whalen, 
Stephen Wilkie, Jaime 
Wilkinson, Christine Wong, 
Elaine Wong, Hiu Wong, 
Stanley Wong, Lena Yuen, 



Brian Sullivan Graduates 
Maritime Academy 

Brian Sullivan graduated He received* a B.S. de- 

from the Massachusetts gree in Marine Safety and 

Maritime Academy at Buz- Environmental Protection, 
zard's Bay. 



Tommy Yuen, Anna Zha. 
High Honors 

Grade 9: Leo Ahern, 
Richard Chan, Dick Cheung, 
Christopher Coughlin, 
Corinne Curran, Matthew 
Donovan, Sean Ginty, Frank 
Guest, Alyssa Hawksley, 
Amy Kwan, Richard Lau, 
Kathy Lee, Katie Lynch, 
Jasmine Maher, Joshua 
Mason, Katelyn McDonald, 
Christopher McGillicuddy, 
Kate McGue, Emily Mui, Mi 
Pham, Tara Ridge, Gemma 
Sheehan, Lauren Sleeth, 
Gregory Sommers, Eric 
Stanton, Cheung-Kwan Yu. 

Grade 10: Denny Chan, 
Mei Chan. William Chy, 
Kellee Conley, Ying Diep, 
Jolene Doolcy, Sarah Garber, 
Gillian Hawes, Shaun 
Jafarzadeh, Stephen Joyce Jr. 
Lora Knepper, Hugo Kwan, 
Michael Manganaro, Julia 
Matos, William McFadden, 
Adam Phung, Jonathan 
Stromberg, Thuy Vu, 
Robecca Wall, Qianwei 
Wen, Steven Wong. 

Grade 11: Andrew 
Bennett, Philip Cai, Tung 
Chau, Michael Cheong, 
Kellie Desmond, Alexander 
Harris, Yue Kung, Jessica 
Lorman, Pearse McGrath, 
Graham McShane, Caitlyn 
O'Donnell, Ching Tu, 
Kimberly Wong. 

Honors 
Grade 9: Erik Borgendale, 
Samantha Chaisson, Eugene 
Desaulniers, Daniel DiNardo, 
Caitlin Doughty, Daniel 
Duggan, John Fidalgo, 
Meghan Holt, Melissa 
McDermott, Mary Ng, 
Andrew Ngo, Valerie 
Ricciardi, Melissa Spezzano, 

Jacinda Su, Flora Tong, 
Stephen Yee. 

Grade 10: Michael 
DeLosh, Binh Duong, 
Christine Ha, Melissa Hogle, 
Stephen King, Ka Leung, 
Christopher Lockhead, 
Jennifer Louie, Kerri Malone, 
Stacy Melchin, Michael 
Mitchell, Lin Nguyen, Merisa 
Reade, Paul Sing, Brian 
Stock, Michael Torchetti, 
Paul Vasquez, Christopher 
Wilson, Jini Zhang. 

Grade 11: Matthew 
Alvarado, Thomas Bell, 
Alexandra Berta, John 
Braitsch, Tsz-Kin Chan, 
Wing Chui, Lauren Enos, 
Kathlyn Gates, Tia Harris, 
Sarah Kane, William Lo, 
James Martel, Wei Mei, 
Heather Meighan, Matthew 
Millerick, Coleman Nee, 
Samantha Pierce, Kim Wong, 
John Zufifante. 



HEAD START PROGRAM 

Head Start is currently accepting applications for children 
ages 3-5 for the 1999-2000 school year. Enrollment is free 
to income eligible families from Quincy, Braintree, 
Weymouth, Hull and Milton. Parents of children with de- 
velopmental needs are encouraged to apply. 

Full day/fiill year programs are also available for eligible 
families. Fees are charged for some full-day programs. 
Transportation is offered to some programs. 

Breakfast and lunch are provided. 

For an application or further information 

Please call (617) 479-8181 ext. 150 

A Program of Quincy Community Action Programs, Inc. 



Thunday, July 22, 1999 Tli« QinAaooy Smi P«gcl3 



Hospital CEO In 
Washington On 
Medicare Cuts 



{Cont'd prom page 3) 

changes when he meets with 
cxMigressional leaders. 

"Some of these changes 
are not even in the realm of 
reasonableness," charged 
Doran. 

Under the proposal, the 
new policy would provide a 
fixed dollar amount for in- 
patient work, no matter how 
little or how long services 
are provided or how long a 
patient stays. 

"The policymakers are 
trying to institute the same 
type of program for outpa- 
tient and E.R. [emergency 
room] work," said Doran, 
noting that Massachusetts 
has just recently enacted 
such a program for the 
Medicaid program and that 
Medicare is fashioned along 
similar lines, modeled after 
Massachusetts' Medicaid 
program. 

Under the proposal, a 
person with chest pains who 
comes into the E.R. would 
need diagnostic tests to rule 
out a heart attack. Medicare 
would reimburse the hospi- 
tal for $170, whatever the 
battery of tests is performed, 
he explained. 

"That doesn't pass the 
common sense test of 
logic," Doran charged. 

"Distilled down to sim- 
ple terms, these changes 
mean real pain for real peo- 
ple, and its impact in each 
community can be signifi- 
cant. ■ 

"There has been signifi- 
cant disintegration and dete- 
rioration of this wonderful 
health care system we have 
come to expect in America, 
and it is falling apart at the 
seams in major ways by 
sweeping policy change. 

"We've got to raise the 



awareness and conscious- 
ness levels of legislators and 
the citizenry so that they 
understand what's happen- 
ing to the health care system 
in the country," said Doran. 

In addition to meeting 
with congressional leaders, 
Doran and the other hospital 
executives are scheduled for 
a White House briefings 
with one of President Clin- 
ton's chief policy advisors. 

In a ranking of antici- 
pated Medicare cuts, Quincy 
was the l(Mh highest among 
the state's 60 community 
bo^itals with an anticipated 
$18 million loss in reim- 
bursements. Carney Hospi- 
tal in Dorchester, which had 
considered an affiliation 
with Quincy Hospital last 
year, anticipates a $25 mil- 
lion loss, while South Shore 
Hospital in Weymouth, 
which earlier this year had 
considered a merger with 

Quincy, anticipated a $24 
million loss. 

Despite the fact that so 
many hospitals are antici- 
pating huge losses as a re- 
sult of the Medicare cuts, 
Doran said he is optimistic 
that the state legislature will 
act favorably on the 
Quincy 's petition to allow 
the proposed affiliation with 
Boston Medical Center. 

"We feel we have a 
unique set of circumstances 
surrounding our strategic 
initiative with BMC," said 
Doran. 

"First and foremost, by 
virtue of our public mission, 
we spend between $5 mil- 
lion and $7 million on free 
and uncompensated care. 
We are not going to com- 
promise that mission," he 
said. 

Further, Quincy Hospital, 



like Hale Hospital in 
Haverhill, is the only mu- 
nicipal, acute care facility in 
the city, he said. There are 
no other cities in the com- 
monwealth without a hos- 
pital. 

But, he said, Quincy 
Hospital is at a competitive 
disadvantage to other hos- 
pitals because it is required 
to finance its estimated $25 
million unfunded pension 
liability. 

"No other ho^ital has to 
play by these r^les," said 
Doran. 

Last week, Doran and 
Mayor James Sheets along 
with Sen. Michael Morris- 
sey and Reps. Stephen To- 
bin, Ronald Mariano and 
Bruce Ayers met with 
House Speaker Thomas 
Fiimeran for an hour to pre- 
sent the city's case on the 
proposed affiliation with 
BMC. 

"I felt it was a very pro- 
ductive and enlightening 
discussion," said Doran. 
"The speaker was pretty 

positive about us and what 
Quincy represents, how sig- 
nificant health care is in the 
city, given the fact that 
Quincy is a city of 90,000." 

Doran said that the cir- 
cumstances which drove 
Boston City Hospital to 
unite with Boston Univer- 
sity, besides being next to 
each other, was the oppor- 
tunity to continue to expand 
its mission and serve the 
uninsured and underinsured 
through HealthNet. 

Allowing BMC to ex.- 
pand to Quincy further ex- 
pands its mission to a 
neighboring community, 
said Doran. 




FAREWELL ~ }At^wn Kathkca aad Robert Kkak wwc recently hraored at a hrewell 
aenrke at the Salvation Anny Qviiicy Tcnple prior to their rcass^nmcnt to HavcrUIL 
With them licrc is Hufo Wibcrt, director of the Adnlt Day Hcahh PrognuB. 

' (Qmncy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 




Turn 



by Laura Andrus and Joan F. Wright 

DinetarofMarkftmg DindorofCommMityRtkHtm 

COMING UP WITH A PLAN 

According to a recent care plans in advance of 
survey by The National need. 
Council on the Aging, fewer While it is very difficult 
than 33% of parents discuss to do, it's important to dis- 
plans for long-term care cuss what your wishes are 
with their adult children, with your adult children, be- 
leaving both to confront the cause a time may come 
issue when the urgent need when those decisions may 
for hospitalization/exten- be made for you, unless you 
sive care arises. Thus, the have made your requests 
children of aging parents known. At Marina Hace, a 
face the very stressful situ- senior living residence, we 
ation of having to address c^er everything from social 
their parents' health prob- and cultural programs to the 
lems in short order. Even medical assistance you re- 
more problematic for them quire. For gracious living in 
may be finding the funds to a scenic seaside setting, visit 
pay for the care. Baby us at Four Seaport Drive, 
boomers may find them- Phone: 617-770-3264. 
selves in a "triple squeeze" 

of having to care for their P.S. Over the next ten 
parents, children and plan years, experts believe that 
for their own long-term care long-term care will replace 
needs. Families of aging childcare as the primary 
parents, therefore, are urged concern fcx baby bowners. 
to discuss their long-term , 



I 



Financing on 

every New 

'99 in stocic! 



Don Cohl knows a good 
deal when he sees one 

• in-depth knowledge 



Don Gohl — Assistant vice 
President for Customer Ser- 
vice at our Quincy Banking 
Center — has sayears expe- 
rience in this area. 

That's Why he saves at the 
Quincy Banking center. 
And why he chose to 
join our staff. 

• Best rates around 

• community 
oriented 



• Friendly, personal service 

Stop by and say hello. Find 
out why we're the one bank 
In town that meets the Cohl 
standard. 

=^ Don especially likes 
our Passtwok sav- 
ings rate. Ask him 
about It 



Mnmumof 
$10 to open 
account 
I Annual Pereentage YieM as of 1/V99 1 fteamAPY 



3.05% 



toeBANKof 



Early morning, evening 
and Saturday hours 



Swing Ou SfMB^.9llP§ii 



%.^f9r?!&!^-: .M-9r~rV^y.- i 



t* 



South Shore Buick 

BRAND MEW 
1999 BUICK CEHWRY 



Dozens to 
choose fromf 



' A-iwJIfii 



EQUIPPED, NOT STRIPPED 

$17,999 



•3,100 Series V6 

• Dual Comhrtemp Air Conditioner 

• Power Windows 

• Power Seat 

• Power door Locks 



Remote Keyless Entry 
Anti-Lock Brakes 
Cwise Control 
AM-FM Stereo Cassette 

* Indudes lebatB. 
' Bnandng m lieu of fe6ote. 



www. ssbuick.com 



50 ADAJnS STv QUINCY • 770-3300 

LOCATED AT THE CORNER Of HANCOCK & ADAMS STREET BY THE QUINCY CENTER T 
Sales Hours: Mon-Thurs 8-8, Fri 8-6, Sat 9-5 Sun 12-4 




fkmft* ##«#-rArj»««e *«.*.• t^»»J«sr««« cat 



#••« 



■«••< 



!•«••• 



«••* 



111^ «*5#*rB' *•«*•■• «*•■' •• "•••' ••?•• •• '••' 



•»» a* '•* I 



•« ••« ••• • ■ •• 



Pisel4 Tl>« Qiainoy Sm> Tharwby, Jnly 22, lf9f 




Flynn & Co. Sells 
Braintree Industrial Building 



Daniel J. Flynn & Co. 
Senior Vice-President Jay 
Nuss has brokered the sale 
of a light industrial 
building on Granite Street 



in Braintree. Corners intersection. 

The 19,408 square foot Previously owned by Mack 

building is situated on 1.77 Realty, the facility was 

acres adjacent to the purchased for $1.18 million 



Radon Inspection Bill May 

Prove Costly To Consumers, 

Realtors Association Says 



IMiKK 





town's landmark Five 



ERA 
CtNIRAL 

Ki: \i. I SI All; 



Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 3^8-3200 




L 



iXPtORi YOyR OPTtOHfS! 

Cau JOi URAfA 

YOVA ft/U-TtMi Rt0i 

isrm CoKfsyiTMTf 
32S-f3f2 



(Sulteis 

STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squantum, MA 02 1 7 1 

mm (617)328-9400 g 

A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 



WOLLASTON OFFICE 

Lynne Houghton, Manager 
Carol Cahill 
Margie Duffy 



Dave Andrews 
Richard Colarusso 
Sandra Fennelly 
Dan Goichman 
Corinne Getchell 
Beverly Joyce 
Dona Nightingale 
Jaimie Paz 
Donna Williams 



Carolyn Flaherty 
Mike Goodrich 
Melissa Higgins 
Ernie Light 
Patrick Mulkern 
Gloria Skolnick 
Osman Yesilcimen 



Give One of Us a Call! 

Conway 



JACK CONWAY 

COMPANY, INC.™ 

Call for a Free 

Market Analysis! 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

wwwJackconway.com 



by Rader Properties, Inc., 
represented in the 
transaction by Jim Rader. 

"Braintree Five Comers 
is a prime location for any 
type of business," said 
Flynn & Co. President 
Paul Talkowski. "The area 
is know as a high-traffic 
spot that provides great 
exposure for nearby real 
estate." 



REPORT 

STREET UGHT 

OUTAGES 

24 hours, 
7days 

376-1490 



FLAVIN & FLAVIN 

Real Estate 




Draft legislation that 
purports to protect would-be 
homeowners from the ef- 
fects of radon gas may 
cause more harm than good 
for homebuyers, warns the 
Massachusetts Association 
of Realtors® (MAR). 

Although the primary 
intent of H.3120 is to in- 
crease the homebuying 
public's awareness of the 
right to a radon inspection, 
MAR officials have raised 
serious concerns about the 
benefits of the bill to law- 
makers, noting that the 
measure could prove costly 
to consumers and add con- 
fusion to an already com- 
plex property transaction 
process. 

As currently worded, the 
proposed legislation seeks 
to mandate all residential 
Offers to Purchase contain 
specific language notifying 
prospective buyers of the 
right to make their offer 
contingent on a radon test. 
But that ability already ex- 
ists, according to MAR offi- 
cials. 

"Buyers have long had 
the opportunity to place 
specific contingencies in 
their offers. This bill will do 



nothing but complete the 
homebuying process by 
adding another layer of 
regulation," said MAR 
President James Dougherty. 

Specifically, the legisla- 
tion would require buyers to 
include the mandatory dis- 
closure language in their 
offers to purchase, and 
should they fail to do so, the 
seller would be unable to 
accept the offer or risk a 
$1,000 fme. 

"This bill is about 'buyer 
beware," not consumer 
awareness," Dougherty said, 

noting that the onus is on 
the buyer to insert the dis- 
closure language. "I fear for 
those buyers who may mis- 
takenly leave out the lan- 
guage and face costly time 
delays that may mean the 
difference between obtain- 
ing their dream home or 
losing out to another buyer," 
he said. 

MAR leaders also urged 
state lawmakers to oppose 
the bill on the basis that it 
would continue the current 
piecemeal approach to 
property disclosure now in 
place in Massachusetts. 
"Without a clearly defined 
property disclosure process. 



it's very difficult for many 
homeowners, especially 
those trying to sell them- 
telves, to comply with all of 
the state's disclosure laws," 
said MAR Chief Executive 
Officer Robert Nash in tes- 
timony before the state 
Legislature's Joint Com- 
mittee on Natural Resources 
and Agriculture. 

Furthermore, MAR 
questioned the need for the 
legislation since radon is 
rarely a problematic issue 
for homebuyers in most 
residential transactions. 
"For those consumers who 
are concerned about the 
radon level in a home, there 
is ample opportunity to ad- 
dress the issue in the home- 
buying process, from the 
Seller's Description of 
Property form our associa- 
tion produces to the home 
inspection that is routinely 
performed in transactions 
today," Nash said. 

Data from the U.S. Envi- 
ronmental Protection 
Agency shows that just six 
percent of all homes in the 
U.S. have an elevated level 
of radon (4pCi/L), and miti- 
gation costs on average are 
estimated at about $1,200. 



Your Teacher, 
Friend & Neighbor 

Call 

STEVE FISHMAN 

For All Your 

Real Estate Needs! 

617-479-1000 



Conway Golf Tournament Raises 
$11,500 For Homeless Shelter 



Jack Conway and Com- 
pany has presented a check 
for $11,500 to Brockton's 
MainSpring House home- 
less shelter. 

The funds were raised 
during the recent charity 
golf tournament, hosted 
each year by the Conway 
Company, 



-CENTURY 21- 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Across fnm BlockiNister & Quincy T 




WOLLASTON 
Two family dose to the Red Line, schools and sboppins. 
Fli^ floor, 5 roMi, 2 bcdrooiiis, second apArtmciit 6 rooBi, 
3 bedrooms. AM ia food ooMtttion and ready to show. 
$279,900. 



Omw 




Century 21 sdls a house every minute. 

When yoa're #1 yon can do things others cai'L 

Sec ail our Hstingi at: wwwx21aBacixoai 



Conway Vice President 
of Sales Denis Lilla deliv- 
ered the donation to Dennis 
P. Carman, executive di- 
rector of the Brockton Coa- 
lition for the Homeless, and 
Julie Vaitkus, director of 
volunteers and donations for 
the BCH. 

More than 150 golfers, 
representing SO Boston and 
South Shore businesses, 
participated in th& 15th an- 
nual MainSpring Charity 
Open Golf Tournament, 
held in June at the Easton 
Country Club. 

MainSpring House pro- 
vides shelter, food, clothing. 



educational programs and 
counseling to individuals 
and families in need; the 
BCH also operates Conway 
House in Middleboro, which 
houses 13 homeless fami- 
lies. Since 1984, the Con- 
way golf tournaments have 
raised more than $150,000 
to support the organization's 
activities. 

Norwell-based Jack 
Conway and Company was 
founded in 1957 and has 
more than 600 agents in 36 
offices from Boston to Cape 
Cod and is the largest inde- 
pendently owned realty 
company. 




^ 



1lMnday,J«ly22,1999 TlMQiilaoy8iiA PagtlS 



Move to One of These Winning Locations 




i rdSS. . ■ _=* . 



Com-mercia 




"■■■■ 




.■^ 




QUINCY 

Former restaurant just off of 

Hancock St. in N. Quincy. 2 

levels, 8,800 SF. 10,995 SF 

lot includes lot directly 

across street. Business B 

zoned. 

Offered at $695,000 













QUINCY CE^f^ER 

Hancock Street Qass A 
office space for lease. 2,600 

SF±, beautiful conference 

room, spacious bullpen area, 

convenient access by car or 

train, adjacent to municipal 

parking garage. 

For Lease at $14^/SF 




QUINCY 

1100 SF single family style 
building with immediate 
highway access, 8712 SF 
lot, on-site parking, to be re- 
zoned for general business. 

Reduced to $195,000 
orlea8cat$18/SFNNN 




QUINCY 

Great visibility for your 

business! 1600 SF retail 
storefront along Route 3A 
Business B Zoned. Local 

along MBTA bus route. 

Reduced to $199,900 
or lease at $2,200/moath 





NORTH QUINCY 

Hancock Street retail 
opportunity in great car and 
foot traffic area. 3,630 SF in 
first floor and ba.sement. On- 
site parking. Business B 
zoned 
Offered at $349,000 




QUINCY 

Retail store with open floor 

plan, 3000 SF first floor 
space with additional 3000 

SF basement. Bustling 

Quincy Ave. location close 

to major several retailers, 

134 feet of frontage. 

Offered at $475,000 





Re si dent ia /^ eat Est at k 

Thinking about selling? Now's the time! Take advantage of this great 

offer. List your home with Flynn & Co. and get $500 back at the closing. 

It's like getting your own comnussion! Call 617-328-0600 today! 



List your home with 
Flynn & Co. 
and get $500 
cash back! 



$600 



»#, 




Call 617-328-0600 



Offer expires 8/31/99 




Present this coupon 

at your closing 

and get a $500 rebate! 



i*r 




Daniel J. 

Flynn & Co., Inc. 

<S^ Check <Mt oar wdMte at wwwj)iiFLYNN.coM 



COMMERCIAL 

SALES 
AND LEASING 

32 Chestnut Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

td 617.479.9000 

flu 617.770.0443 



RESIDENTIAL 
REAL ESTATE 

37 Billings Road 

Quincy, MA 02171 

Id 617J28.0600 

hx 617.3283871 



|l 



Page 16 Tlim Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1999 



Ml- |LS 



QUINCY POUCE 



5S 




i^suy^i 



w 



MtfndaY.JulYii 

BREAK, 8:04 a.iii^ 1017 Hancock St., J.N. Phillips 
Class Co. 

ARMED ROBBERY, 4:50 p.m., 161 Newbury Ave., 
Kim Market Three white males wearing white "T' shirts 
and one black male not wearing any shirt, entered market 
and robbed owner. Baseball bats were used. 

BREAK, 6: 17 p.m., 90 block of Crescent Street 

VANDALISM, 8:10 p.m., Bates Avenue and Willard 
St A car window was broken. 

Tkicsdav.Julvl3 

BREAK, 9:13 a.m., 27 Glendale Rd., Neighborhood 
Club. Window smashed, cash register taken. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 4:57 p.m., Newbury Avenue. 
Father reports that three white youths and one black youth 
took $5.00 from his 14-year-old son. 

BREAK, 5:58 p.m., Lexington St 
Wednesdav.Iulvl4 

LARCENY, 11:20 a.m., Marina Bay. Boat owner re- 
ports the theft of a $600 out drive. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 3:34 p.m., 85 Quincy Ave., 
US lYust Suspect is a white, male, 5 ft. 8 in., 150 lbs., red 
hair, wearing a baseball cap, dark green polo shirt, blue jeans, 
and sunglasses. 

BREAK, 7:36 p.m., 138 Willard St Apartment broken 
into. 

T!iur8daY,.TulYlg 

BREAK, 6:08 a.m., 3 Cottage Ave, Black male attempted 
to break into apartment. 

LARCENY, 5:32 p.m., Weeden Place. Resident reports 
the theft of a Nokia cell phone that was left in a car. 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 6:59 p.m.. Crescent St Pry 
marks on door. 

rridaY..TulYl^ 

LARCENY, 7:04 a.m.. Victory Road. Contractor reports 
the theft of a compressor from job site. 
Saturdav.Iulvl? 

VANDALISM, 12:23 a.m., Hancock Parking Area. 
Party reports the rear window of a 1991 Chevrolet was 
smashed. 

VANDALISM, 8:21 a.m., Rawson Rd. Resident reports 
the rear window of an 89 Chrysler was smashed sometime 



overnight. 

LARCENY, 10:33 a.m., 60 Beale Street Party reports 
the theft of a Bell Atlantic cell phone. 

BREAK, 12:02 p.m., 600 Mock of Sea Street 

INDECENT EXPOSURE, 1:12 p.m., 733 Hancock 
Street Suspect is a white, male, 45 years old, 5 ft. 9 inches 
tall, gray hair, brown pants, gray shirt, exposed himself and 
continued walking north on Hancock Street. 

BREAK, 7:28 p.m., 1357 Hancock St, Quincy Col- 
lege Book Store. Officer Cronin dispatched and arrested a 
58-year-old Quincy man. 

BREAK, 10:01 p.m., 60 Mock of Broadway. 

SundaYiJulYlg 

BREAK, 4:55 a.m., 55 Grafton Street Apartment bro- 
ken into. Suspect is known to victim. 

BREAK, 8:42 a.m., 200 block of Granite Street Ga- 
rage broken into, two bikes stolen. 

Total Calls for Service: 1225 
Total Arrests: 57 
Stolen Cars: 10 
Drunk Driving Arrests: 2 
If you have information on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quincy Police Detective Bureau at 745-5764. 
If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call the Drug 
Hot-Line at 328-4527. You will not be required to identify 
yourself. If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention Of- 
ficer for comments or tips, call 745-5719. My e-mail ad- 
dress is bhanna@ci.quincy.ma.us 



STOLEN 

Date Stolen From 

7/18 15 Ocean Street 

7/18 101 Falls Boulevard 

7/18 101 Burgin Parkway 

7/18 363 Hancock Street 

7/18 3 Cottage Avenue 

7/16 Granite & Water Sts. 

7/16 196 Ricciuti Drive 

7/15 305 Quincy Shore Dr. 

7/15 103 Penn Street 

7/14 254 Quarry Street 



CARS 

Year/Make/Model 

1987 Ford Escort 
1987 Olds Cutlass 

1998 Harley Sportster 
1990 Mercury Cougar 
1989 Pontiac Firebird 

1989 Dodge Van 

1999 Chevy Lumina 

1990 Chevy Lumina 
•92 Mitsubishi Box Truck 

1992 Chevy Lumina 



Big Brother Association Seeking Volunteer Mentors 



NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Big Brother Association 
of Greater Boston is seeking 
men to become volunteer 
mentors to boys in the 
Greatei Boston communi- 
ties. 

Information sessions 
about the program will be 
held at the agency's Quincy 
office, 1509 Hancock St, 



Suite 205, Monday, July 25 
at 6 p.m. 

Individuals interested in 
becoming Big Brothers, or 

signing up to attend the 
commitment-free informa- 
tional session should call 
(617) 542-9090. "Walk in" 
attendees are also welcome. 



Established 
in 1 960 

20 years under 
same ownership 




ALfrel 



reco s 



DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

Starting at ^4'^ 

1 1:30am-3:00pm 
Monday - Saturday 

Famous for Home Cooking 
Generous Portions - Reasonable Prices 

Entertainment 

Wednesday through Sunday Nights 



Generally, Big Brothers 
meet with the boys for a few 
hours each week or every 
other week. 

A recent survey by Pub- 
lic/Private ventures of 
Philadelphia found that boys 
who have Big Brothers are 
52% less likely to skip 
school, 37% less likely to 
skip class, 46% less likely to 
start using drugs and 37% 
less likely to start drinking 
than their peers. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE jSr ^7y3'4600 

WED&THURS JULY 21 & 22 

Cher ■ Maggie Smifft ■ Judi Deoch 
'TEA WITH MUSSOUNr(PG) 

Comedy Drama 
EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



^Vscstaurant b Lounge 
15 ^rankUrt Street, Quincy, MA 02169 • TeL 472-W5 \ 



STARTS FRI JULY 23 

Juta Roberts Hu^GrmA 

'NOTTING HILL' (PG-13) 

Romance Comedy 

FRI & SAT 7:00 4 9:15 

SUN - THURS 7:00 ONLY 

imTfmwaMimrr 



au SCATS ISO 



Why Trust Your Memories To Anyone Else! 



4/1 Mfof ir DoA0 Oil l\U 

• 1 Hour Photo Finishing 

• Same Day Slides (E-6) 

• Enlargements 

• Reprints 

• Dupe Slides 

• Slides From Prints 



• 19 Years Exp§ri9n($ 

• Photo Restoration 

• Slides From PowerPoint 
& Harvard Graphics 

• Internet Ready Photos 

• Videos From Pictures 
Slides & Movies 

• Instant Passport Photos 



PhotoQuick of Quincy 



1363 Hancock St. Quincy C«nter 

Visit u« at www.photoquickquincy.com 
Hours: M-F 8:30-6pm • S«t 10-3pm 




GRANITE 
LOCK CO 

SERVICE ^ MOBILE 
AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 



t 



•DEADWlTSMSrAUID 
•lOOSIBSYED 
•DOOiaOSEIS 
•PiMKHAnWAK 
•AUTO SYS FITTED 
VISIT OUR SHOWROOMI 
755SO.ARTEinr,QUINa 

472-2177 



Crime 
Watch 

By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




How Parents, 

Staff Can Make 

Schools Safer 

PARENTSi 

• Sharpen your parenting skill. Emphasize and build on 
your children's strengths. 

• Teach your children how to reduce their risks of becom- 
ing crime victims. 

• Know where your kids are, what they are doing, and 
whom they are with at all times. Set clear rules in advance 
about acceptable activities. 

• Ask your children about what goes on during the school 
day. Listen to what they say and take their concerns and 
worries seriously. 

• Help your children learn nonviolent ways to handle frus- 
tration, anger and conflict. 

• Do not allow your child to carry any type of weapon. 

• Become involved in your child's school activities - PTO, 
field trips, and helping out in class or the lunch room. 

• Work with other parents in your neighborhood to start a 
McGruff Safe House program. 

SCHOOL STAFFi 

• Evaluate your school's safety objectivity. Set targets for 
improvement. Be honest about crime problems and work 
toward bettering the situation. 

• Develop consistent disciplinary policies, good security 
procedures, and response plans for emergencies. 

• Train school personnel in conflict resolution, problem 
solving, drug prevention, crisis intervention, cultural sensi- 
tivity, classroom management, and counseling skills. Make 
sure they can recognize trouble signs and identify poten- 
tially violent students. 

• Encourage students to talk about worries, questions, and 
fears about what's going on in their schools, homes, and 
neighborhoods. Listen carefully to what they say. 

• If a student makes a threat of violence, take him or her 
seriously. Address the problem inmiediately and act to pre- 
vent a potential conflict. 

• When something violent and frightening happens at 
school or in the neighborhood, take time to talk about it. 
Discuss the consequences and get students to think about 
what other choices besides violence might have been avail- 
able. Get help from trained counselors if necessary. 

• Work with students, parents, law enforcement, local 
government, and community based groups to develop wider- 
scope crime prevention efforts. 

COMMUNITY PARTNERS: 

• Law enforcement can report on the type of crimes in the 
surrounding community and suggest ways to make schools 
safer. 

• Community-based groups, church organizations, and 
other service groups can provide counseling, extended learn- 
ing programs, before and after school activities, and other 
community crime prevention programs. 

• Local businesses can provide apprenticeship programs, 
participate in adopt-a-school programs, or serve as mentors 
to area students. 

• Colleges and universities can offer conflict management 
courses to teachers or assist school officials in implement- 
ing violence prevention curricula. 

• If we all work together, we can make a difference. 
From: National Crime Prevention Council 

Neil Deery Graduates 
Maritime Academy 

Cadet Neil J. Deery of Academy at Buzzard's Bay. 
Quincy graduated from the He received a B.S. de- 
Massachusetts Maritime gree in Marine Engineering. 



Quit 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 


Smoking. 


American Heart fn 
AssodatKMU^^ 



ii J ll»^M<k4€«f •«»»Mii«««.UiJ##«*«««UJ«#9«M4r 



^■% ■ 



Thunday, July 22, 1999 TIm Qulnoy Sua Page 17 



Spcrts 



AMERICAN LEGION 



Morrisette 
On A Roll 

Faces Brockton After 
Sweeping Wellesley In 
First Round OfPlay-Offs 



By CHRIS POISSON 

It's not how you play at 
the beginning; it's how well 
you finish down the stretch. 

Those were the words 
Morrisette manager Ray 
Cattaneo recited when his 
team was 4-8 and in danger 
of missing the playoffs sev- 
eral weeks ago. 

He must have foreseen 
something because his team 
hasn't lost a game since. 
Morrisette (12-8) finished 
the regular season on a ram- 
page, winning its final eight 
games, and 10 of its last 11, 
to earn a second seed in the 
Zone 6 East American Le- 
gion baseball playoffs. 

And it has been perfect 
in the postseason, sweeping 
Wellesley (9-11-1) in a best- 
of-three first round series, 
with a pair of 5-0 shutouts 
over the weekend. 

Morrisette will play 
Brockton, the third seed, in 
the next round. The first 
game was played while the 
paper was in print 
(Wednesday at Edgar's 
Playground). The winner of 
the series will face the win- 
ner of the South Attleboro- 
Milton matchup. 

"We've been on a good 
roll and we haven't 
stopped," said Cattaneo 
Monday afternoon. "And 
winning changes every- 
thing. You get your confi- 
dence and you start to have 
fun and enjoy it." 

Matt McCann and Rob 
Celata tossed the shutouts in 
the first and second games, 
respectively. McCann struck 
out nine, gave up six hits 
and walked three in his stint - 
on the mound. 

Morrisette had only six 
hits in the game, but it was 
enough for McCann, who 
earlier in the season was a 
victim of run support and 
poor defense. 

Joe Flynn led the way, 
going 2 for 3 with two 



RBIs. John Gavin and 
Adam Goodrich each had a 
hit and one RBI. 

In Celata's outing, he 
allowed seven hits, walked 
four and punched out 12. 
Billy Walker went 3 for 4 
with one RBI, and Shawn 
Manning and Goodrich each 
added a pair of hits. 

"We got excellent pitch- 
ing from Celata and 
McCann and great defense," 
said Cattaneo. "Our hitting 
wasn't that great but we got 
it when we needed it." 

In the final three games 
of the season, Morrisette 
knocked off West Roxbury 
twice, 5-4 and 8-6, and 
Milton, 7-3. 

The first game against 
West Roxbury was a con- 
tinuation from July 2, when 
the game was postponed 
because the lights went out 
at Adams Field. West Rox- 
bury had a man on second 
with one out in the seventh, 
but Celata came in and got 
the next two batters out. 

In the bottom of the in- 
ning, Celata doubled with 
two outs and scored the 
winning-run on Gavin's 
single. 

Celata started the second 
game and went the distance, 
allowing six runs on 10 hits. 
He picked up the win thanks 
to his teammates hot bats. 
Keith Doherty went 2 for 4 
with home run and five 
RBIs to pace the attack. 
Walker and Gavin added 
two hits apiece, and Celata 
did well from the plate with 
three hits and two RBIs. 

Doherty pitched against 
Milton to close out the 
regular season. He fanned 
eight and allowed five hits 
and three runs in seven in- 
nings of work. He also con- 
tributed with two hits. 

Walker, Gavin and Pat 
Bregoli also had two hits 
each. 



Two North Quincy Boys' 

Soccer Players Suit Up 

For Metro Team 




>*^:~i<»- 



1969 QUINCY BABE RUTH All-Stars which won the state 
tournament on home-town soil 30 years ago. Standing, left to 
right: Norman Nelson, coach; Bob McKay, Bob Torino, 
Dave Nelson, Mark Welton, Bob Morton, Bob Silva and Bob 
Malvesti. Seated, Dave McMillan, coach; Steve Cannon, 
Tom Burke, Jim Walker, Mike Gormley, manager, Connie 



Driscoll, Rnss MacDonald. Front row, Tim Flynn, Gerard 
Shepard, bat boy; David Drew. Missing from photo: Tom 
Joyce. Quincy will host this year's Eastern Massachusetts 
IS-year-oM Babe Ruth Championship at Adams FieM which 
gets underway Friday at 4 p.m. 



Tournament Opens Friday At Adams Field 

Quincy All-Stars Hope 
History Repeats Itself 



Thirty years ago this 
week, if you asked what 
were the chances of the 
Quincy Babe Ruth All-Stars 
winning the state tourna- 
ment, someone might have 
replied about the same as 
man landing on the moon. 

Well, we know man 
reached the moon and, yes, 
Quincy became state 
champs, the only Quincy 
Babe Ruth team ever to do 
so. 

Miracle Mets? How 
about the Amazing All-Stars 



of Quincy. It won with its 
top hurler. Bob McKay, 
sitting on the bench 
throughout the New Eng- 
land tournament with an 
injury. 

It had to beat another 
Quincy team in the tourna- 
ment to get to the state fi- 
nals. 

After Quincy captured 
the crown, it was awarded 
the state trophy at a pre- 
game ceremony at Fenway 
Park and the players got to 
shake' hands with Frank 
Malzone. 



BABE RUTH 




Why this brief history 
lesson? Because the Eastern 
Massachusetts IS-year-old 
Babe Ruth Championship 
will be held in the 1999 
Quincy Babe Ruth team's 
own backyard, Adams Field 
from July 23-30. And home 
field might be an advantage 
for the team to match the 
'69 feat. 

The eight-team tourna- 



ment will play two games at 
4 and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. 

Winners from this round 
will advance to the Babe 
Ruth regioQals and those 
teams that get past the re- 
gionals will travel to Man- 
chester, N.H. for the Cham- 
pionship. 

Tickets are $3 for each 
game, or $8 for an all-games 
pass. 



JUNIOR FARM 



Cheney Club 
Champions 




Two members of North 
Quincy High School's boys' 
soccer team selected to play 
for the Metro team in last 
week's Bay State Games 
held July 15-18. 

Rick Loughmiller, mid- 
fielder/defender, and Steve 
Rochon, forward/midfielder, 
helped Metro shut out three 
of its opponents and com- 
pile a 3-1-1 record, which 
put it into the Gold Medal 
game against Southeast 



where it lost 1-0. 

Rochon scored two of his 
team's nine goals and 
Loughmiller provided man- 
marking and solid defensive 
pressure. 

The Bay State Games, 
"Massachusetts Own Olym- 
pics," provide an q>portu- 
nity for the state's best ath- 
letes to compete with one 
another. UMass-Boston 
hosted the soccer competi- 
tion. 



Cheney Club knocked 
off the Wiz Kidz, 5-2, to 
win the Quincy Youth 
Baseball Junior Farm Divi- 
sion championship. 

Cheney Club's Daniel 
Myers and Wiz Kidz' John 
Ciccariello pitched excellent 
games, as both teams got 
strong pitching throughout 
the playoffs. 

Cheney Club started the 
regular season slowly as 
they lost two of their first 
three games. But they ended 
up winning 13 games and 
they stormed through the 
playoffs with five straight 
wins. 

The Wiz Kidz, however, 
started the season on fire as 
they were in first place for 
the first half of the season. 



They then suffered a mid- 
season slump which earned 
them a sixth seed in the 
playoff. But they regrouped 
to reach the championship 
game. 

Cheney Club was led by 
a group a hard-hitting and 
slick-fielding nine-year- 
olds: John Alexander, Wil- 
liam Berberan, Casey Con- 
ley, Tom Conley, Jeffrey 
Dunn, Stephen Muller, My- 
ers, Matthew Shaw and 
Brian Sullivan. 

Wiz Kidz nine-year-old 
hitting and fielding starts 
included Alexander An- 
dreosatos, Christopher 
Boyd, Ciccariello, Michael 
Jay, Stephen Matos, John 
Rowland, Jarred Ward and 
Robert Yovino. 




JOHN ALEXANDER of the ChcMy Club ami Patrick White 
of Wiz Kidz in a dow play at the plate. 

fBo6 Bossart Photo) 



Report Street Light Outages 

24 hours^ 7 days 

376-1490 



ROUND BAU BASKETBALL CAMP 

FOR BOYS & GIRLS 

August 2-6 Ages 8-11 

August 9-13 Ages 12-16 

Loccrtion: North Quincy High 

Guest Lecture^ DoHy Instruction and Gomes 

Col Fbr Brochure! 
Ted Stevenson 328-3409 or 471-1846 



Page 18 Tb* QulAoy Sua Thursday, July 22, 1999 




CNA Captures Title 



CNA scored at least two 
runs in every inning as it 
captured the Triple A cham- 
pionship with a 19-4 victory 
against Quincy P.A.L. at 
Mitchell Field. 

Steve O'Neil pitched a 
complete-game with six 
strikeouts to earn the win. 
He also had two hits and 
two runs scored to help on 
the offensive side. 




Kellan Losi smashed a 
home run, singled and 
scored three times. Defen- 
sively, he had three putouts 
from the outfield. Kyle 
Costa went 4 for 5 with a 
walk and four runs scored 
and Harman Losi also had 



four hits and scored three 
times. 

Justin Petkus and Chris 
Garvey each added two hits. 

For PAL, John Grillo, 
Domenic Poli and Jason 
Purves played well. 



IMAGINATIVE INSURANCE are champions of the InternatioDal Babe Ruth League for the 
second consecutive year. Bacli row, from left. Assistant Coaches Dave Grogan, Sr. and 
George Camia, Sr. Middle row: Steve Foley, DaUas Hudgins, Adam Trinkle, Chris Sheehan, 
George Camia, Mike McGuire, Adam Ohara and Coach Jimmy Abdou. Front row: Brian 
Campbell, Steve Sechetti, Chris Jacobs, Brian French, Dave Grogan and Shawn Richardson. 

Imaginative Insurance 
Wins Second Straight Title 



Jaehnig Chiropractic Wins 
Two Play-Off Games 



JUNIOR LEAGUE 1^ 



Imaginative Insurance 
took two of three games to 
beat O'Brien's Bakery in 
the International Babe Ruth 
championship series. 

It's their second con- 
secutive title under the helm 
of manager Jimmy Abdou, 
who is 40-3 over the last 
two seasons. 

"This was a challenge 
that we were all up for," 
said Abdoif. "It is not easy 
trying to repeat. My boys 
worked as hard as any team 
at any level in this city." 

Imaginative won the first 
game, 18-5, as George 
Camia struck out 15. Dave 
Grogan and Adam Ohara 
each had three RBIs. Shawn 
Richardson belted a home 
run. 



INTERNATIONAL 




O'Brien's took the sec- 
ond game, 15-13, and then 
Imaginative captured the 
crown with a 12-6 win in 
the final game. Dallas 
Hudgins pitched four in- 
nings and struck out six. 

"If you ask around the 
league it is common knowl- 
edge that he is the league's 
most improved player," said 
Abdou. "He has worked 
extremely hard." 

Grogan, Richardson and 
Brian French each had two 
hits. Mike McGuire col- 
lected four RBIs. 

George Camia, McGuire, 
Grogan, Richardson, 



Hudgins and Ohara all bat- 
ted over .300 while playing 
for Abdou. 

"Those six guys had an 
amazing run," Abdou said. 
"It is sad to see them go." 

Abdou, a second base- 
man for the N.A.B.A's 
Quincy Royals, is not sure if 
he will return next season. 

"I want to enjoy this 
championship for a while," 
he said. "I'm not really sure 
right now. I'm looking for- 
ward to helping the Quincy 
Royals make the playoffs 
now. I'll make a decision 
after the season." 



In Quincy Junior League 
baseball playoff action, 
Jaehnig Chiropractic has 
used excellent pitching, 
great defense and timely 
hitting to win its Hrst two 
games. 

In a 14-1 victory against 
Burke Club, Dave Jaehnig 
tossed a one-hitter and 
struck out 14, including the 
first seven batters to earn 
the win. 

It was the third one-hitter 
of the season, to go along 
with a no-hitter, for Jaehnig. 

Chris Marinelli and Mo 
Al Khatib smacked three 
hits apiece and combined 
for five RBIs to lead the 
offensive attack. 

John Fitzgerald, Matt 
Tobin and Matt Jaehnig 
each had two hits. 



Conor Roche broke up 
the no-hitter with a double 
in the last inning that drove 
in Tim Randell for Burke's 
only run. 

Jaehnig Chiropractic - 4 
Colonial Federal - 

Jonathan O'Conner 
mixed a hard fastball and 
nasty changeup to hold the 
powerful Colonial team to 
only two hits. 

John Santon was just as 
good, holding Jaehnig 
scoreless after three innings 
with five strikeouts. 

Jaehnig finally broke 
through in the fourth inning. 
Tobin singled, went to third 



on Kevin Donovan's double 
and scored when Matt 
Jaehnig laid down a perfect 
squeeze bunt. Donovan 
scored when his aggressive 
base running drew a wild 
throw to third base. 

David Jaehnig drove in 
an insurance run in the Hfth 
inning on single to center 
and scored on Marinelli 's 
single. 

Ten-year-old Nick Al 
Khatib made a spectacular 
play in right Held when he 
nailed a Colonial runner at 
first base in the last inning. 

Nick Malvestri and Dan 
Scribi had hits for Colonial. 



Colonial Federal Opens With Wins 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 47 1-3 1 GO 



Registration For M anets 
Football, Cheerleading 

Manets football and Ju>y 24 from 9 a.m. until 1 

cheerleading registration P™- at LaBreque Park, 
from the ages of 9-14 will _ . . . -,^^ 
take place this Saturday, Registration is $55. 



Quincy Men's Softball League 



WELCOME YOUNG FIELD -- Games Thru 7/16 



Colonial Federal opened 
the little league playoffs 
with a 7-2 victory against 
South Shore Buick in recent 
action. 

Raymond Marchand 
pitched a strong game, fan- 
ning 11 in six innings. Nick 
Malvesti had a triple, two 
singles and two RBIs and 
played well behind the plate 
as he threw out two runners 
on the base paths. 

Dave Djerf knocked a 
two-run single in the fourth 
inning and Dan Scribi had 
three RBIs. 

For Buick, Mike Arafat 
was effective, striking out 
nine before giving way to 
John Ridge in the sixth. 

John Folino blasted a 



fourth-inning home run 

while Matt Haskins had two 

hits. 

Colonial Federal - 9 

Kiwanis - 2 

David Djerf and Nick 
Malvesti each belted two- 
run home runs while Ray 
Marchand had a double, two 
singles and two RBIs. 

John Santon turned in an 
eight-strikeout performance. 

Dennis Layden and Mi- 
chael Garland each pitched 
three strong innings for Ki- 
wanis. 

Mike McPherson crushed 
a sixth-inning home run and 
Andrew Patten added a tri- 
ple. 

Colonial Federal - 9 
Lions •4 



Ray Marchand had a 
double, triple and an RBI 
and Nick Santon added a 
double and an RBI, as both 
players also combined to 
shut down the Lions from 
the mound. 

Nick Malvesti stroked a 
two-run single in the fifth 
and Jeff Green and Dan 
Reggiannini also singled. 

Chris Rooney came up 
with a big play, gunning 
down Sean Kane at home 
plate to end the game. 

Jimmy Aikens and Joe 
Burlo pitched well for the 
Lions. Brett Martinson, 
Kane and Drew Loud pro- 
vided solid hits for the Li- 
ons. 



TEAM 

Yellow Cab 

Carpet One - Harry's 

Alumni/DiBellas 

Kelley's 

Mudhen's 

Blue Notes 

Kings 

Murphy's 

8 Ball George 

8 Ball Bobby 

Shooter's 

Bobby D's 



W 

15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
11 

m 

7 
6 y:^ 

•sab- 
1 



L 

5 ''^-" 

6 

7 -. 

7 

8 

9 

9 
14 

13 

15 

19 



Pet. 

.789 
.750 
.667 
.632 
.632 
.600 
.550 

.333 
.310 

.21 1 
.050 



GB 



2 
3 
3 
3 

4 

5. 
9 
9 
11 

14 



1/2 
1/2 



1/2 
1/2 



South Shore YMCA Seeks 
Fundraising Volunteers 



FAXON PARK FIELD - Games Thru 7 16 



TEAM 

Cronin's 

Cagney's/White on White 

Hair Place One 

Darby's Walsh 

Darby's Burke 

Brigham & Women's Hifigg 

Malachy's 4f^ 

Silver Star 

Dee Dee's 

Varsity aub 

Liberty Lounge 

Owen O'Leafys 





^722 




.100 



GB 

3 

31/2 
31/2 
41/2 
61/2 
81/2 

m 

101/2 
121/2 
12 
151/2 



The South Shore 
YMCA's fundraising office, 
79 Coddington St., Quincy, 
is looking for volunteers. 

Projects include assem- 
bling mailings, light data 
entry, special event related 
projects, and clerical work. 

The fundraising office is 
responsible for the organi- 
zation, implication, receipt, 
and recognition of contribu- 
tions that support the mis- 
sion and purpose of the 
South Shore YMCA. Every 



dollar raised helps those 
who cannot afford to pay 
the full fees for programs 
and memberships. The 
YMCA's financial assis- 
tance program ensures that 
no one who needs or wants 
services is turned away. 

The South Shore YMCA 
is an association of indi- 
viduals dedicated to im- 
proving the quality of life 
for all through programs 
that promote a healthy body, 
mind, and spirit. Rooted in 
Christian traditions and val- 



ues, the YMCA seeks to 
serve all people, regardless 
of age, sex, race, religion, or 
economic circumstances. 
The YMCA programs and 
services strive to strengthen 
the family, guide the youth 
of today, and meet the ever- 
changing needs of our 
community. 

For more information, 
contact Jill McDonough, 
Director of Development at 
the South Shore YMCA, at 
(617) 479-8500 ext 109. 



Stanley Wong Awarded Bentley College Prize 



Stanley W(»ig of Quincy, 
a junior at North Quincy 
High School, was recently 

presented with a 1999 
Bentley College Book 
Award. 



Recipients of the prize 
have expressed interest in 
majoring in busings in col- 
lege and are nominated by 
their high sdiool in recog- 
nition of tbeir academic or 
extracurricular activities. 



The winner received 
Probability I: Why There 
Must Be Intelligent Life in 
the Universe, by Amir D. 
Azcel, assodate fnrofessor of 
mathematics at Bentley 
CoUege. 



Thuraday, July 22, 1999 Th^ Quiaiey Sm> Page 19 



Residents Want Cleaner, Sandier Beaches 



(Cont'd from page I) 

enjoyed not only in the 
summer but throughout the 
year by local residents," 
said Morrissey. 

"The MDC needs to ad- 
dress many problems on the 
beach,," said Morrissey, 
"and this meeting gives the 
MDC the opportunity to 
view the beach and work 
with the Quincy delegation 
to make the beach safer, 
more structurally sound and 
more enjoyable for every- 
one." 

The Quincy delegation 
was expected to point out 
the need for improvements 
to the seawall at the Fenno 
Street parking lot area and 
the need to continue its im- 
provements of the park at 
East Squantum Street and 
Quincy Shore Drive. 

Morrissey said the offi- 
cials will review the ongo- 



ing plans and improvements 
for Caddy Park, as well as 
the proposed improvements 
under the "Back to the 
Beaches" program. 

"We want him to see first 
Kand what a big role Wol- 
laston Beach plays in 
Quincy," added Ayers. "The 
27 miles of shoreline affect 
a lot of people, not only in 
Quincy but on the South 
Shore. "And there are a lot 
of recreational opportuni- 
ties, " said Ayers, citing 
sunbathing, sailing and 
swimming. 

He said traffic safety is 
an issue as well. 

Meanwhile, Kelly and 
fellow commission mem- 
bers were expected to unveil 
the statistics compiled as the 
result of a beach survey 
mailed to all the city's tax- 
payers in late spring. 

More than 2,000 surveys 
were returned, and two 



members of the Eastern 
Nazarene College faculty. 
Ken Constantine and Mi- 
chael Roberts, and 14 stu- 
dents, input the survey data. 
The city's data processing 
department also was helpful, 
said Kelly who, along with 

some commission members 
Hnished up the task when 
the students went home for 
the summer. 

According to the survey, 
residents said swimming at 
cleaner, s^dier beaches was 
the number one priority 
among beachgoers. Many 
acknowledged they went to 
the beach only to sunbathe 
or to walk; only a small per- 
centage went to the beach to 
swim, Kelly said. 

In addition, more than 
four-fifths of the respon- 
dents said they visit other 
beaches on the South Shore 
or Cape Cod to go swim- 
ming because the water is 



cleaner and the beaches are 
sandy. 

Another concern which 
emerged from the survey 
was that people want to see 
stepped-up efforts to mini- 
mize pet waste on the 
beaches. Along Wollaston 
Beach, which is owned by 
the MDC, there are 17 sta- 
tions where mutt mitts are 
available. 

An interesting fmding, he 
said, was that 93 percent of 
the respondents want to visit 
the Boston Harbor Islands 
from Quincy. 

Sheets appointed the 
beach commission last Oc- 
tober. In addition to Kelly, 
members include Douglas 
Gutro, Margaret Milne, Ka- 
tie Barrett, M. Jane Galla- 
hue, Robert Galligan, Rob- 
ert Lescinskas Sr., Anne 
McDonald, Michael Morad, 
David Murphy and John 
Nigro. 



Morrissey Says Prostate Cancer .skIS'h«;"rq»c«ly "p^I^ 

Research Deserves More Funding g'.7wL*h '^h'K 

Representatives level- money may also tie into an );?!^^^.^J!?A' ^'l®?'.!?!? 

funded DPH's prostate can- influx of pharmaceutical " 

cer account. 

Men diagnosed 



State Senator Michael 
Morrissey says "prostate 
cancer research deserves 
greater attention and fund- 
ing in Massachusetts." 

Morrissey said his 
amendment to earmark 
$500,000 for a prostate can- 
cer research grant program 
was adopted by the full 
Senate during its Fiscal 
Year 2000 budget debate. 

Morrissey 's amendment 
establishes a Massachusetts- 
based scientific research 
grant program focused on 
prostate cancer prevention, 

detection and treatment. The 
program will be adminis- 
tered by the state's Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

"With one in five men 
estimated to develop pros- 
tate cancer, the Common- 
wealth has an obligation to 
do its part to find better 
treatments and, hopefully, a 
cure," said Morrissey. 

Prostate cancer is the 
second leading cause of 
cancer death among all men. 

The American Cancer 
Society and numerous 
prostate cancer support 
groups joined Morrissey in 
lobbying for greater funding 
for prostate cancer research. 
Morrissey stepped up his 
efforts in the Senate to in- 
crease prostate cancer 
funding after the House of 

Stephen Gildea 

On Holy Cross 

Dean's List 

Stephan G. Gildea, a 
second year student at the 
College of the Holy Cross, 
has been named to the 
Dean's List for the second 
semester of the 1998-99 
academic year. 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Gildea of 676 Fur- 
nace Brook Parkway, 
Quincy, he is majoring in 
history. 



Quit Smoking. 



cleanliness and water qual- 
ity of the beaches they visit 
and what improvements 
they envisioned. 

Public restrooms was one 
of the responses, as well as 
a suggestion to fly flags to 
indicate whether it is safe to 
swim. 

The Quincy health de- 
partment samples water 
quality at 10 beaches each 
Monday, according to 
Cynthia DeCristofaro, sen- 
ior sanitarian. Recently, she 
said, it has rained after the 
sampling which can raise 
the level of the fecal coli- 
form count. 

She suggested that peo- 
ple wait 'between 24 and 48 
hours after a rain before 
swimming in the public 
waters. 

Samples are taken at the 
following beaches: Mound 
Beach and Avalon Beach in 
Quincy Point, Broady or 
Baker Beach in German- 
town, Rhoda Street or 
Rockland Beach in Rock 
Island Cove, Houghs Neck, 

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



off Raccoon Island and 
Edgewater or Manet Beach, 
also in Houghs Neck. 

On Quincy Bay are 
Parkhurst Beach in Houghs 
Neck, Post Island or Heron 
Beach on Adams Shore and 
Chickatabot Beach in Mer- 
rymount. Other city beaches 
include Orchard Beach, 
which faces Quincy Bay, 
and Nickerson Beach, which 
faces Dorchester Bay. 

There are no lifeguards at 
the city's beaches, however. 

DeCristofaro said the 
Massachusetts Water Re- 
sources Authority and the 
MDC sample water quality 
at Wollaston Beach daily, 
including weekends, at four 
locations — Milton Rod, 
Channing Street, Sachem 
Street and Rice Road. 

At some point, the mayor 
would like to publish a bro- 
chure which highlights the 
beaches as well as some of 
the other coastline treasures, 
like Marina Bay and, some 
day, the Souther Tide Mill, 
said Kelly. 

POimCAL ADVERTISEMENT 



with 
prostate cancer face the 
choice of possibly suffering 
either impotence or inconti- 
nence, Morrissey said. After 
a standard radical pro- 
statectomy for the treatment 
of prostate cancer, 65%- 
90% of men develop impo- 
tence. Following a radical 
prostatectomy, 35% of men 
have incontinence, he said. 

The prostate cancer re- 
search grant program will 
provide research "seed" 
money, which can be lever- 
aged by researchers for 
greater federal funding for 
research, Morrissey said. 
One state grant recipient last 
year secured a $453,000 
federal research grant with 
his research conducted us- 
ing a $15,000 award for 
prostate cancer research 
from the Department of 
Public Health. 

Morrissey noted "cancer 
research money in Massa- 
chusetts can lead to job 
creation." Cancer research 



visited a beach outside 

business, which further ^^- , , ^ 

boosts Massachusetts' posi- Th* survey also asked 

tion as a champion in bio- '[!*P°"^«"_^«_ i°i*!*.°".* 
medical research, he said. 



scale of one to five on the 




fooltmss 

by Dr. RkhardA Hacker 

SiayeoiH'odlatrist 

BUNIONiS' 

Bunions are one of the most It is important that bunions be rec- 
comnion foot ailments. These red, ognized early and evaluated by a po- 
swollen, sometimes painful bumps diatrist. He or she can then offer sev- 
near the big toe are a result of hal- eral suggestions on controlling the 
lux valgus, a condition where the cause of the bone deformity so that 
big toe rtMates toward the second the symptoms do not arise or become 
toe. Genetics and shoes can play a more severe. Recommendations may 
role in the development of bunions, include exercise, a change in footwear. 
The inherited shape and mcchan- orthotics, medication and surgery. Let 
ics of some feet make them prone us do what we do best - diagnose and 
to bunions. Wearing tight or ill-fit- treat your particular foot problems 
ting shoes is a major cause of bun- with compassion, knowledge and up- 
ions. If a bunion causes persistent to-datc equipment and techniques, 
pain, a podiatrist may prescribe We're lodated at 110 West Squantum 
orthotics (special shoe inserts). St., No. Quincy. (617-472-3466). 
Another option is surgical correc- P.S. To relieve pain associated 
tion. There are more than 100 dif- with bunions, wear shoes with wide 
ferent surgical treatments of bun- toe boxes and good insoles, try an anti- 
ions, many of which require the inflammatory like aspirin, place cold 
foot and leg to be in a cast and im- compresses on the area, or soak the 
mobilized, perhaps for weeks. foot. 



Joe Newton 

Candidate for 
Ward 6 City Councillor 




Is Having A 

Harbor Cruise 

Aboard the Boston Belle 
Thursday, July 29 

Departs from Marina Bay at 7pm 

$25 Donation 

Tickets Limited, Call 328-1250 

Paul Murphy, Secretary, 17 Conant Rd. 




Amefkan Heait I 

WEKEFKHnNG FOR YOUR UFE 



« 



Stick with WJDA and win! 



WJDA's 1999 Bumper Sticker Giveaway 



Winning is easy! 



STOP 




...at a participating sponsor location! Including: 

Hing ham Lumber. 190 Summer Street, Hingham; Petal's Automoti ve A Eric's Autobodv. 330 Quincy Avenue. Quincy; 
The Fours Restaurant 15 Cottage Street, Quincy; Bridyewater Credit Union. 34 Chapman Street, Quincy; fioKbeslei 
Door & Window. 41 Hallet Street, Dorchester, Konditor Meister. 32 Wood Road, Braintree 



...for the 1999 WJDA Bumper Sticker! 

Take one and put it on your car! 



LISTEN I -^ 1300«WJDA weekdays at 7:20am and 12:05pm! 

If you hear your plate called, call 617-479-1300 within 13 
minutes to claim $50 WJDA Dollars you can use at any 
paiticipating sponsor location! 



Thanks tor listening. 




1300 'WJDA 

South Shore Btpadcaiting GnnpaiiY 



on 



mm 



Pt»2t TlfQuimQy 



Tkmday,jBljr22,1999 




Avoiding Heat Stress, Potential Complications 



As the weather heats up, potential complications like 
seniors should try to keep heat exhaustion, heat stroke, 
cool to avoid heat stress and heart failure and stroke. 




Dana Smith, D.P.M. and George J. Ducach, D.RM 
Surgeons-Podiatrists 

SNAPPING OR POPPING OF JOINTS 

Quite often a patient will and modifying their activities, 
demonstrate how their foot Surgical treatment may be nec- 
makes a "snapping or pop- essary in some cases like the 
ping" sound when a joint is peroneal tendons (tendons that 
moved in a certain way. The pass on the outside of the 
patient invariably then asks: ankle). The hip (caused by the 
"Is this something to worry iliotibial band) and the scapula 
about?" These "snapping syn- or shoulder blade (caused by an 
dromes," as they are called in abnormal relationship between 
some text books, are common the scapula and the rib cage), 
and often do not cause any If you are having any foot 
harm. problems, call and schedule an 

Some conditions, however, appointment at 773-4300. We 
can cause more pronounced are located at 1261 Furnace 
symptoms and may have to be Brook Parkway, Suite #18, 
treated. Most people respond Quincy, and are affiliated with 
to conservative care like physi- Carney, Quincy and South 
cal therapy, local injections Shore Hospitals. 



"Heat and high humidity 
can put a strain on your 
body. Seniors are especially 
vulnerable to prolonged 
exposure to high tempera- 
tures and humidity because 
of physical changes they've 
experienced," said Sandra 
Carlson, RN, clinical edu- 
cation specialist for Ded- 
ham-based Visiting Nurse 
Associates. The non-profit 
agency is part of \f^A Care 
Network and provides com- 
prehensive home health care 
to residents of Quincy and 
the South Shore. 

"Knowing the warning 
signs of heat stress and tak- 
ing precautions to avoid it 
can help keep you healthy 
during the summer," 
Carlson said. 

Temperatures above 90 
degrees Fahrenheit and/or 
high humidity are especially 
dang:;rous, but it doesn't 
take a heat wave to cause 
problems. If you experience 
any of the mild signs of heat 
stress, including feeling hot 
and uncomfortable, loss of 
appetite and lack of energy, 
try these tips for keeping 



cool from the staff of Visit- 
ing Nurse Associates: 

• Exercise before 9 a.m. 
or after 6 p.m., when tem- 
peratures tend to be cooler. 

• Stay in an air- 
conditioned public place, if 
possible, such as a library or 
senior center. If you are 
unsure if your town has a 
senior center or other air- 
conditioned place for sen- 
iors, call your local Council 

on Aging for further assis- 
tance. 

If you are unable to go to 
an air-conditioned place on 
a hot and/or humid day, try 
to: 

• Stay in the shade and 
out of direct sunlight. 

• Take a slightly cool 
bath or shower. 

• Put cool, damp towers 
on your body. 

• Use fans to keep air 



circulating. 

• Avoid strenuous activi- 
ties. 

• Wear light-colored, 
lightweight, loose clothing 
Inade out of materials that 
allow sweat to evaporate 
such as cotton. Avoid syn- 
thetic materials like polyes- 
ter. 

• Protect your head and 
neck when outside by 
wearing a hat or using an 
umbrella. 

• Drink frequently to 
replace fluids lost by 
sweating. Avoid fluids con- 
taining alcohol, caffeine, or 
salt. If you have a problem 
with retaining water or a 
special medical condition, 
check with your doctor 
about the amount of fluids 
you should be drinking. 

• If you use a stove, try to 



cook during cooler times of 
the day. 

* Use salt tablets only 
with your doctor's approval. 

* Don't ignore the warn- 
ing signs of heat stress. 

Contact a doctor or other 
health care provider if the 
mild signs of heat stress 
continue for a prolonged 
period of time after taking 
these actions. Contact a 
physician immediately if 
you are experiencing any of 
the following serious 
symptoms of heat stress: 
breathing problems, chest 
pain, cramps, diarrhea, diz- 
ziness, dry skin (no sweat- 
ing), great weakness, mental 
changes, nausea, rapid 
heartbeat, throbbing head- 
ache and/or vomiting. 

For more information, 
call (800) 728-1862. 



Eating And Lifestyles Changes 
For Achieving Ideal Weight Topic 



Children Adults 

Teens mJI» r\ Families 

Robert Azrak, Ed.D., F.A.CO.R 

Licensed Psychologist 

Mass Bay Counseling, 1 Billings Rd., North Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 
www.inergy.com/RAzrakPsychoIogy 



As part of South Bay 
Chiropractic's complimen- 
tary nutrition lecture series. 
Dr. Michael J. Recupero 
will speak on eating and 
lifestyle changes for 



Give. 



American Heart 
AssodaticHiJ 



« 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



achieving ideal weight on 
Wednesday, July 28 at 7 
p.m. 

South Bay Chiropractic 
is located at 110 West 
Squantum St., Suite 27, 
North Quincy near the 
North Quincy MBTA sta- 
tion. 

Upcoming lecture topics 
include menopause Aug. 11 
and PMS Aug. 25. 

For more information 
and/or reserve a space, call 
(617) 328-6300. 




DR. MICHAEL RECUPERO 



Finally, A Dental Office You Will Tell Your Friends About! 



Friendly, Experienced Staff 
Accepting Most Dental Plans 
Modem, Clean Bright Office 
New Exam & X-Rays $69 
Tooth Whitening 




NOW SILVER TO 

"NATURAL WHITE" 

ATA FEE EVERYONE CAN AFFORD! 

Upgrade Unsightly, Old Silver Fillings 

To The New "Invisible" Composites. 

It's Your Choice. 

Call NOW for a Consultation 

or Appointment 



Ask About 0% 

12 Month Financing ^^^k W. Con.p.lJL, 3>. 2>S. (617) 479-6000 

110 West Squantum Street, North Quincy (A block from the Red Line) 
"Finally a Dental Office that will make you Smile!" 



Women Sought For Research 
Study On Bulimia Nervosa 



The Psychiatry Research 
Unit at Beth Israel Deacon- 
ess Medical Center is re- 
cruiting women who have a 
current or past history of 
bulimia nervosa for partici- 
pation in a research study. 

Female volunteers who 
are currently bulimic, or 
have recovered from past 
symptoms of bulimia, age 
18-45, in good medical 
health and not taking medi- 
cations (including oral con- 
traceptives), are sought for a 



study of behavioral ratings 
and blood hormone levels. 

Eligible participants will 
receive $150 for a total of 
three outpatient visits and an 
additional $175 for each of 
two overnight stays at the 
Clinical Research Unit at 
Beth Israel Deaconess 
Medical Center. 

For more information, 
call Kelly Whitney, Psy- 
chiatry Research Unit, Beth 
Israel Deaconess Medical 
Center, Boston, at (617) 
667-4013. 




NEW WEIGHT LOSS MEDICATION 

XENICAL- 

Call for information or 
to schedule an appointment. 



covered by some Insurances 




Located In the Granite Flaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Gnuiite Street. Bralntree. HA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVro S. EGILBgAN, BO, BflPH, BIEDICAL DmECTOR 



A^e you At RfSfc 

LYMErlx™ 

Lyme Disease Vaccine 

Now Available at 



Covered by most insurances 




Located in the Granite Plaza 
next to the Ground Round 



South Shore Health Center 

759 Gnmite Street, Braintree, MA 02184 
(781) 848-1950 

DAVm 8. EGILMAN, MD, liPH. BAEDICAL DmECTOR 



,»*«t*444i*,s«/M m*.%s»*»#j»«»i%vHW^*««»*m*#^«« 



. »»«MHI » W H'» # I Wf» |-» «»«.»)» 



■ ^■■.A.->. 



I III W ^M ^ ^ H ' ^-^ — 






TharMiay,jHly22,1999 Tb« Qulsioy Sua Page 21 




leiCN 



Family Religious 
Program Registration 
At St John's Church 



Quincy Point Congregational Bethany Congregational 



St. John the Baptist Par- 
ish is holding registration 
through Aug. 29 for the 
1999-2000 family religious 
educatimi program. 

Registration packets for 
family enrolled during the 
past academic year were 
mailed in February, but any 
previously enrolled family 
that has not received a 
packet or those families 
with children entering kin- 
dergarten or grade 1 or are 
new to the area are asked to 



caU 617-479-0125. 

The parish hall is wheel- 
chair accessible and easily 
adapted as classroom space. 
Children with special 
learning needs are welcome, 
and the parish staff will 
work with families to de- 
termine the most suitable 
learning arrangement. 

For additional informa- 
tion, call Lori DiCenzo 
Carter, director of religious 
education, at the parish hall. 



Vacation Bible School 
At First Presbyterian 



Children ages four 
through 11 are invited to 
join Vacation Bible School 
at First Presbyterian Church, 
270 Franklin St., July 26 
through July 30. 

This year's theme will be 
Son Castle which will fea- 



ture life-related Bible sto- 
ries, songs, skits, crafts, and 
games that help children 
leara about love, joy, peace, 
patience, and kindness. The 
program is from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon. The Bible School is 
free of charge. For more 
information, call 773-5575. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Rev. Deryk Mason, 
minister of the Highland 
Congregational Church, 
Jamaica Plain, will speak at 
the 9:30 a.m. worship serv- 
ice Sunday at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church. 

The service marks a con- 
tinuation of a long-standing 
tradition of sharing with the 
Highland Church when 
members of that church 



come to Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational to worship on 
the last Sunday of July each 
year. 

There will be a coffee 
hour following the service. 

The Snowman Christmas 
Fair Committee will meet 
following the Coffee Hour 
with Co-Chairwomen Carol 
Hallett, Gayle Mackay and 
Carrie MacLean. 



First Presbyterian 



Sunday activities at 
First Presbyterian Church, 
270 Franklin St. begin with 
Sunday School at 8:30 and 
worship service at 9:30 
a.m. 

Mark Peake will 
preach. Each week there is 
a childrens' sermon which 



correlates with the pastor's 
message. 

Wednesday Night 

Magic will be held 
Wednesday, July 21 and 
July 28 at 6:30 p.m. It will 
start with a casual meal 
together followed by a 
variety of activities. 



Bible School At 
Union Congregational 



The Union Congre- 
gational Church, 136 
Rawson Rd., Wollaston, is 
sponsoring a Bible School 
program for the children of 
Quincy and surrounding 
towns. 

The program, to be held 



July 26-30 from 9 a.m. to 
noon is a learning 
experience for children 
ages three to 11 years of 
age. 

For more information, 
call the church at 479- 
6661. 



Vacation Bible School 
At Salvation Army 



The Quincy Salvation 
Army, 6 Baxter St., will 
hold a Vacation Bible 
School Aug. 23-27 Monday 
through Friday for children 



entering K-6th grade. 

Hours will be from 6:30 
to 8:30 p.m. 

For more information, 
call 617-472-2345. 



Veggie Tales At 
Glad Tidings Bible School 



The Veggies Tales will 
be featured at the 
Vacation Bible School at r u i- 

Glad Tidings Church, 158 P*^ °^ *« /^"^ !»P- ^ 
Washington St. on Aug. 4- Admission is free 



Veggie Tales, wacl^ 
games, prizes, puppets, 
and a Moon Walk will be 



for 



7 p.m. 



children ages 3-11. 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodationJ 



« 



"Hidden Treasures'* is 
the theme for the 9 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church. 444 Wash- 
ington St. 

The service will be led 
by Rev. Cherie Daniel. 
Joyce Romeri will serve as 
Deacon of the Day. 

Music leadership will be 
offered by interim music 
director Paul Thistle, with 
Lutfullah Bulent Guneralp, 
tenor soloist. 

Paul DiBona is the 
videographer of the morning 
service. 

Sunday will be the ^al 



worship leadership for both 
Rev. Daniel and Thistle. 

Childcare is provided 
beginning at 8:45 a.m. Sun- 
day for infants and young 
toddlers. Summer Sunday 
Sessions are held for chil- 
dren of preschool age 
through those just complet- 
ing eighth grade. 

Following the worship 
service, fellowship is held in 
the Social Hall. All are in- 
vited. 

For more information, 
call 773-6424. Summer of- 
fice hours are Monday 
through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 
noon. 



Rev. George Hodgkins 
will preach on "Admiration, 
Aftirmation, Commitment" 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center. 

Scripture reader will be 
Shirly Pyne. Music will be 
provided by Holly Archer, 
flutist, and Thomas Boyer, 
organist. 

The Lemonade in the 
Shade Church School will 
also meet at 10 a.m. Greet- 
ers will be Jean and Jim 
Ross. 

A Fellowship Hour with 
light refreshments will be 



held in ^llen Parlor fol- 
lowing the worship service. 
Childcare will be provided 
for infants and toddlers. 

The Mid-Week Concert 
next Wednesday, July 28 at 
12:15 p.m. will feature a 
Woodwind Trio consisting 
of Terry Myers, bassoon; 
Bill Kirkel, clarinet; and 
Audei Markowitz, oboe. 

Concert is free but a 
luncheon will be available 
for $3. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



U3uiuciT ;ivcHaiini 4^ii*iH*tin*u 



SIRMCISdiACIIMTirS 



l"^*;'"!." 






rtadT idinas 

ISB^fuhfn^ M.7Qufncy 

fthoiw: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory £. Wheaton, l^stor 

Summer Worship 

Schedule Sunday, Warn 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
AoContemporary Worship 
M •Marriage & Faniily Group 
ii •International Fellowship 
^ ^ •DivofceCare 




Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St.j Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

Masses: 
Saturday 4:30PM 
Sunday 9AM & 11AM ^ 
Daily Mass 9AM . 



STAR OP THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confyssions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptism. 2nd Sunday, 1 1:15AM 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock Strett WoilMton • 479^400 

Pastor: Rev. Thomas Keane 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11 :00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Cttairlitt Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 1 1:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handlcaopad Aoo9$8M)l0 

New Memt)ers Wekomel 



Conspn^^onal 



Church Of St John 
The Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Uturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

HmiH^cafiped Acc»t8ibh 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 11:30 a.m. & 5 pen 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15^:45 pm 

HarxiKapped acoessit)le & 

Handkiapped parking, side entrance 

akr conditioned 

Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Catholk: Community w^ing together 

in Faith, Worsts, Eduction and SenKO' 

386 Hancock St, North Quincy, MA 02171 

(817)3284066 

Sunday Msmm 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45wn, 9am (FamJiy Liturgy) 

10:30wn (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weel(day Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sal 9am 



HOUGHS NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue, Quincy 

"VV/jere 77?© Star Of Love Shines' 

Services of Worship 

9:30am 

Wheelchair accessible 
Air conditioned 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

9AM SufKlay Worship 

Church Schooi with Child Care Provided 

The Trickster Gets Trid<ed' 

Rev. Cherie Daniel Assoc. Peistor 



Sat. 3^:45pm in SairM Joseph Oratory 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach Street & Rawson Rd., Wollaston 

479-6661 

Rev. John Carl Swanson, pastor 

Sunday Worship 10AM 



pal 




St Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 
WoUasten • (617) 472-0737 

Rev. Claude Smith 

Sunday Worship 

9:30ain 

Morning Prayer with 

Sermon and Eucharist 

Cliild care provided 

Everybody Welcome 
Thrift Shop Closed for the Sumner 




TO ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE CALL 471-3199 




BS T HANV 

CONGREGAVONAL CHURCH 

Comer of Spear & Coddington Sis., 

Quincy Center •479-7300 

10am Worship Service 

Rev. George Hodgkins preaching 

'Adoratk>n, Affirmation, Commitmenf 

Jremonade In Th<^ Shade Church School 

P Foursquare Gospel 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Comer of Nmwbury Ave. A 

Sagamore St, N. Quincy 

847-4444 

Guest preacher Rev. Phil Wilson 




^ 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNfTED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

773-3319 

Sunday Worship 10AM 

Rev. Carol A. Stine, pastor 



"WTfBff? 



Nazi 



■> wmm 

azarene 



Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave.. Wollaston, 472-5669 

Rev. Sunuel Chung: Pastor 
Quincy Chinese Clwrch of ttie Nazarene 

Sunday Services, 8:45atn Holy Communion 

9:30s»n Cantonese Worship (Angell Chapel) 

9:45am Christian Education (all ages) 

11am Morning Worship Celetyation 

* Nursery Care and Chikken's Church throu^ grade 4 

6pm Evening Service (contemporary) 

The WoBaston Chuntx^ the Nazarene is 

air conMioned and utiheekhair accessible. 

AUAREWELCX)ME 



Protestant 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St, Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spirlluali^t 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St, Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Servk» Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev. RHa S. Bediovntz, C.H..C.M. 




TOADVERTISE 
IN THIS 
DIRECTORY, 
PLEASE 
CALL 
471-3100 



l.*r 



Pafc22 TlMQuiB03r«ua Tlmndv. J«ly 22, 1999 



CciTtJAI^IES 



Nicolina Voipe, 86 

Retired Quincy Schools Employee 

A funeral Mass for Ni- United States at age 21 and 

colina Volpe, 86, of Quincy, settled in Quincy. 
a retired employee of Wife of the late Vincent 

Quincy Public Schools, was Volpe, she is survived by 

celebrated Monday in St. two daughters, Lydia Ta- 

Joseph Church. glieri of Quincy and Anna 

M. Coleman of Braintree; 

Mrs. Voljje died July 16 12 grandchildren and eight 

at home after a long illness. great-grandchildren. 

She was a matron at Burial was in Blue Hill 



Alice V. Gallivan, 88 

Registered Nurse, 
Parker School PTA Member 



Allen M. Kelly, 74 

Owner Of South Shore Printhig, 
Decorated Worid War U Veteran 



died on May S, 1998, lived 

in Quincy for SO years. 

Lovers of music, the couple 

had several friends who 

the Parker School PTA, was were professional musicians pr[nJi' 7n Quliicy and a 

celebrated Monday in St. that they followed to many ^^^j^ "^^^ „ ^^^' ^j„ 

cities up and down the East 



A funeral Mass for Alice 
V. (Good) Gallivan, 88, of 
Quincy, a registered nurse 
and long-time member of 



A memorial service for 
Allen M. Kelly, 74, of 
Marshfleld, owner and op- 
erator of South Shore 



Quincy High School at the 
time of her retirement in 
1967. 

She was a member of the 
Quincy Retiree's Associa- 
tion and was a communicant 
of St. Joseph Church. 

Born and raised in Italy, 
she immigrated to the 



Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy Center. 

Donations may be made 
to Old Colony Hospice, 14 
Page Terrace, Stoughton, 
MA 02072. 



Ann's Church, Wollaston. 

Mrs. Gallivan died July 
15 at her daughter's home in 
Plymouth. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
raised in Dorchester. 

She was a graduate of St. 
Joseph's Academy in 
Brighton and attended the 
Boston City School of 



Coast. 

Over the last year, due to 
failing health, Mrs. Gallivan 
spent time at her children's 
homes in Quincy, Plymouth 
and New Hampshire. 

She is survived by two 
sons, James M. Gallivan, Jr. 
of Quincy and Christopher 




SCOTT DEW ARE 



A Thought 
For The Week 

We have said before thai we are proud to 
be a locally owned and family run Funeral 
Home. We would like to share with you some 
of our beliefs. .. 

We believe that our first duty to the fami- 
lies in our community is to serve our friends 
with a professional, yet caring and per- 
sonal attitude. Dignity, understanding, hon- 
esty and value are our traditions. 
We believe that each service should be offered in accordance with 
each family's individual point of view. And this means not imposing 
ideas, but accepting the family's wishes and offering advice when it is 
requested. 

We believe it is our duty to provide our services within a wide range 
of prices that every family can afford. 

We believe what we do is important to every family and how we do 
it is important to us . . . Every detail of a ftanenU service is important to 
us. 

To those We Serve We Pledge: confidential business and profes- 
sional relatfonships; cooperation with customs of all religions and 
creeds; observance of all respect due the deceased; the highest stan- 
dards of competence and dignity in the conduct of all services; truthtkU 
representation of all services and merchandising. 

Deware FamUy Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 

Wollaston Chapel Hannel Chapel 

576 Hancock Street 86 Copeland Street 

Quincy, MA 02170 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

A (617) 472-1137 
Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Nursing, where she became Gallivan of North Conway, 
a registered nurse. She was N.H.; two daughters, Ce- 



a registered nurse for more 
than 50 years. 

She was a 20-year mem- 
ber of the Parker School 



celia Loughman of Ply- 
mouth and Marie Fox of 
Bow, N.H.; 11 grandchil- 
dren and four great- 



be held Wednesday, July 28 
at 7 p.m. at the First Parish 
Unitarian Church of Nor- 
well, 24 River St., Norwell. 

Mr. Kelly died July 15 at 
home. 

He worked as a stock- 
brocker and as a manager 
for Sherman Hamill prior to 
starting his own printing 
business. 

A World War II Marine 
Corps veteran, he received 
the Air Medal for courage glider pilot 
and devotion to duty in the gardening. 




ALLEN KELLY 

He also served as chair- 
man of the Marshfield 
School Committee. 

Mr. Kelly was a certifled 
and enjoyed 



PTA in North Quincy and grandchildren. She was the 
the Marthas group at Arch- mother of the late Alice V. 



bishop Williams High 
School in Braintree. 

Mrs. Gallivan was a 
reader for ihe Boston Guild 
for the Blind and belonged 
to the Great Books Club. 

She and her husband, 
James M. Gallivan, who 



"Sue" Gallivan and John V. 
Gallivan. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 



face of anti-aircraft fire. 

He was a senior member 
of the Kiwanis Club of 
Quincy and a member of the 
service organization's Le- 
gion of Honor signifying 25 
years of membership. 

For several years, Mr. 



were made by the Keohane Kelly was chairman of the 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- Quincy Kiwanis Club's 
cock St., Wollaston. 



Born in Toronto, he at- 
tended Columbia University 
and the Institute for Foreign 
Trade. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Deborah B. Kelly; a 
son, Bruce Kelly of 
Marshfield; three daughters, 
Pamela Albright of 
Prunedale, Calif., Sarah 



Dr. Leon G. Jacobs, 87 

Worked In Family Practice 



Major Emphasis Committee Kelly of Hanover and Jes- 
which is responsible for sica Gray of Plymouth; two 



A funeral service for 
Leon G. Jacobs, 87, of 
Quincy, a retired doctor, 
was held July 14 at Temple 
Beth El, Hancock St. 

Dr. Jacobs died July 13 
at his home after a long ill- 
ness. 

He worked in his family 
practice in Quincy from 
1947 to 1975 and on the 
adjudication board of the 
Veterans Administration in 
Boston from 1975 until 
1994. 

Dr. Jacobs also volun- 
teered at Quincy Hospital 
and participated in health 




Grandpa loved 
gardening, baseball, 
and playing the 
harmonica. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's gathering some of 
the flowers he so tenderly 
cultivated or finding 
a musician to play 
"Take Me Out to 
the Ball Game" on the 
harmonica, you can count on us to help 
you plan a service that will be just as 
unique as the person you love. 



^oUanc ^uneraf iServico 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 




screenings at the Quincy 
Health Center and served as 
an adviser to the center. 

He was very involved in 
Temple Beth El in Quincy 
and served on the board of 
trustees. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mildred E. (Mael) 
Jacobs; a son, Steven A. 
Jacobs of Marshfield; two 
daughters, Miriam S. 
Greenspan of Marshfield 
and Lee-Anne Jacobs of 
Quincy; and a granddaugh- 
ter, Susan Greenspan. 

Burial was in Sharon 
Memorial Park, Sharon. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Levine 
Chapel, Brookline. 

Donations may be made 
to Temple Beth El, 1001 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02169, or to 
one's choice. 



coordinating donations for 
needy and underprivileged 
children in the Quincy 
school system and local 
conmiunity. 

He was also a former 
member of the Kiwanis 
Club's Board of Directors 
and served on various com- 
munity service and fund- 
raising committees over the 
years. 

Mr. Kelly was a former 
member and treasurer of the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

He was also a member of 
the Old Colony Sportsmen's 
Club, where he was an avid 
skeet shooter. 



brothers, David Kelly of 
Truro and Chris Kelly of 
Arizona; two sisters, Eileen 
Kelly of New York and 
Sheila Kelly of Province- 
town; and tliree grandchil- 
dren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the MacDon- 
ald Funeral Home, 
Marshfield. 

Donations may be made 
to the Prostate Cancer Re- 
search Fund, Massachusetts 
General Hospital, 100 
Charles River Plaza, Suite 
600, Boston, MA 02114 or 
Cranberry Hospice, 89 
Court St., Plymouth, MA 
02360. 



Edith T. Salamone, 69 



Give 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



A funeral Mass for Edith 

T. (Doyle) Salamone, 69, a 

homemaker, was celebrated 

a charity of Monday in St. Joseph's 

Church, Quincy Point. 

Mrs. Salamone died July 
15 at Hancock Park Reha- 
bilitation Center after a long 
illness. 

Bom and educated in 
Boston, she trad lived in 
Quincy for 48 years. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Walter "Bob" 



« 



and Raymond F. Salamone 
and Richard P. Salamone, 
both of Quincy; a daughter, 
Lee M. Meehan of Quincy; 
a brother, Francis E>oyle of 
Yarmouth; a sister, Cather- 
ine Doyle of Weymouth; 
seven grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 



Funeral 
were made 



arrangements 
by the Bolea- 



Salamone; three sons, Gary Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
J. Salamone of Brockton, 116 Franklin St., Quincy. 





Member by Invitation 



National Selected Morticians 



I' 



Celebrating our 

50th yinni^^ersary 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 1NDEPENDENCE AVENUE 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02160 

(617) 472-6344 



1' 



.:uc:u 



Tlranda7,jHl]r22,1999 TluiQalsMisr 



Pa|e2» 



Joseph T. Concannon, 69 

Retired Quincy Police Sergeant; 
NQ FootlNiU HaU Of Fame Inductee 



Paul J. Bombaci, 84 

Retired MBTA Bus Driver, Inspector 



Francis GleasoA, 91 

Retired Tobin Bridge Toil Operator 



A funeral Mass for Jo- 
seph T. Concannon, 69, of 
Quincy, a retired Quincy 
Police sergeant and a North 
Quincy High School Hall of 
Fame football player, will 
be celebrated today 
(Thursday) at 9 a.m. at Sa- 
cred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Mr. Concannon died at 
his home Monday. 

Bom in Boston, he was a 
lifelong Quincy resident. 

He was on the Quincy 
Police force for 11 years, 
retiring in 1967 as a ser- 
geant. Following his retire- 
ment from the force, he 
worked as a supervisor for 
Stop & Shop Supermarket 
Security for 18 years. 

He was an outstanding 
football player at North 
Quincy High School. He 
was nominated as Out- 
standing Lineman in his 
senior year 1946. 

He was inducted into the 
North Quincy High School 
Hall in 1994. 

Mr. Concannon was a 
member of the Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. 

He was an avid fan of 
boxing and attended many 



matches. He enjoyed all 
types of sporting events. He 
never missed a North 
Quincy versus Quincy 
Thanksgiving Day football 
game until his health started 
to faU. 

Mr. Concannon was a 
good friend to many people 
in North Quincy. 

Former husband of the 
late Marilyn Igo Concan- 
non, he is survived by a son, 
Joseph Concannon of 
Quincy; and two step-sons, 
Stephen Igo of Quincy and 
John Igo of Marshfield. He 
was also the father-in-law of 

the late Susan Igo and the 
son of the late Michael 
Concannon and Ethel 
(Buckley) Coughlin. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled Wednesday from 
7 to 9 p.m. at the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., WoUaston. 

Burial will be in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to Hospice of Greater Bos- 
ton and Brockton, 500 Bel- 
mont St., Brockton, MA 
02401. 



Rose Rozner, 89 

Former Secretary For 
Quincy Building Inspector 



A funeral service for 
Rose (Weisman) Rozner, 
89, former secretary for the 
Quincy building inspector, 
was held July 18 at 
Temple Beth El. 

Mrs. Rozner died July 
15 at the Quincy 
Rehabilitation and Nursing 
Center. 

Mrs. Rozner received 
the Mayor's Award for her 
expertise in the building 
department, where she 
worked for 25 years. 

She was born and 
educated in Binghamton, 
N.Y. Upon graduating from 
high school, she worked as 
the secretary for a New 
York state senator and in 
the office of former New 
York Gov. Nelson B. 
Rockefeller. 

Mrs. Rozner was a 
member of the Temple 
Beth El in Quincy and a 
member of the temple's 
Women's League, the 
Women's Council of the 
Beth Israel Synagogue and 
Hadassah, and was on the 
Board of Directors of the 
Jewish Community Center 
in Quincy. She was also a 
charter member of the 



Holocaust Memorial in 
Washington, D.C. and a 
member of the Multiple 
Sclerosis Organization. 

She was also deeply 
involved in the plight of 
returning Vietnam veterans 
and with concerns of 
Native Americans. 

Mrs. Rozner was a fan 
of the Celtics, and she 
celebrated her 80th 
birthday at the former 
Boston Garden. 

Wife of the late Arthur 
M. Rozner, she is survived 
by a son, Joel Rozner of 

Maryland; a daughter, 
Marilyn Kozodoy of 
Halifax; a sister, Dora 
Suskind of Hyannis, a 
granddaughter, several 
nieces and nephews and 
several great-nieces and 
great-nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Schlossberg and 
Soloman Memorial 
Chapel. 

Donations may be made 
to the U.S. Holocaust 
Memorial Museum, 100 
Raoul Wallenberg Place 
SW, Washington, D.C. 
20024. 



Helen E. Harrington, 93 

Retired Jordan Marsli Co. Vice President 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen E. (Reardon) 
Harrington, 93, of Quincy, 
a retired vice president for 
the Jordan Marsh Co. in 
Boston, was celebrated 
Wednesday at St. Ann's 
Church in Wollaston. 

Mrs. Harrington died 
July 17. 

She worked at Jordan 
Marsh for 26 years, retiring 
as vice president of the 
company. 

She was a graduate of 
Braintree High School and 
Boston University. 

Wife of the late Earle 
B. Harrington, she is 
survived by a brother, 1st 



Sgt. Paul D. Reardon, U.S. 
Army, of Falmouth; a 
sister, Mary Ventre of 
Braintree, two 

grandchildren and five 
great-grandchildren. She 
was the mother of the late 
Master Chief Robert E. 
Harrington, U.S. Navy, and 
Virginia Reed. 

Burial was in Fairmount 
Cemetery in Weymouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 1115 West 
Chestnut St., Brockton 
02301. 



A funeral Mass for Paul 
J. Bombaci, 84, of Quincy, 
a retired bus driver and 
inspector for the M.B.T.A. 
in Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday at St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. Bombaci died July 
17 at Quincy Hospital. 

He worked as a bus 
driver and inspector for the 
M.B.T.A. in Quincy for 38 
years before retiring in 
1977. He had previously 
worked for the former 
Boston Elevator Company. 

Mr. Bombaci was a 
volunteer at Quincy 
Hospital and a member of 
the Navy League in 
Boston. 

Bom in South Boston, 
he was a graduate of 'the 
former Mechanic Arts 
High School in Boston. 

Husband of the late 



Mary (Mazzeo) Bombaci, 
he is survived by a son, 
Paul N. Bombaci of 
Virginia; a brother, 
Anthony Bombaci of 
Brighton; three sisters, 
Sadi Cioffi of Everett. 
Josephine Ragalefsky and 
Mary Aleberti, both of 
Maiden; and his extended 
family, Nia Bissanti of 
Quincy and her sons, 
Joseph Bisanti of 
Weymouth and Michael 
Bissanti of Braintree and 
their children. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, in Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Bolea-Buonfiglio 
Funeral Home, 116 
Franklin St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Old Colony 
Hospice, 489 Page St., 
Stoughton 02072. 



A funeral Mass for Fran- 
cis "Frank" Glcason, 94, of 
Quincy, a toll operator on 
the Tobin Bridge for 30 
years, was celebrated July 
17 at Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Church, 100 Sea St. 

Mr. Gleason died July 14 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

He retired from the Mas- 
sachusetts Port Authority 
after working as a toll op- 
erator on the Tobin Bridge 
for 30 years. He also was 
employed by the Boston 
Red Sox where he was in 
charge of ticket reserva- 
tions. 

He played semi- 
professio;ial baseball with 
the Chelsea Merits for a 



time. 

Mr. Gleason was a mem- 
ber of the BoSox Club and 
the Young Men's Christian 
Union in Boston. 

He lived in Chelsea be- 
fore moving to Quincy 15 
years ago. 

He is survived by two 
sons, Boston Police Detec- 
tive Thomas J. Gleason of 
Quincy and John F. Gleason 
of Las Vegas; six grandchil- 
dren and two great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Holy Cross 
Cemetery, Maiden. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Lydon 
Funeral Home, 644 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 



Peter J. Tompkins, 48 

Owned Hair Styling Business 



Linda C. Schmidtke, 44 

Tourism Assistant For 
Canadian Government 



Linda C. Schmidtke, 
44, of Quincy, a tourism 
assistant for the Canadian 
government for 25 years, 
died July 14 at Sunrise at 
Weymouth. 

She was bora in Quincy. 

She is survived by her 
parents, Eva (Passenheim) 
and Heinz Soldan of 
Jacksonville, Fla.; a 
brother, Richard 

Schmidtke of Abington; a 
sister, Sabine Landry of 



Jacksonville, Fla; a long- 
time companion, M. Kevin 
DeCourcey, and several 
nieces, nephews, 

grandnieces and 

grandnephews. 

Cremation services 
were handled by the 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Old Colony Hospice, 14 
Page Terrace, Stoughton, 
0202. 



A funeral Mass for 
Peter J. Tompkins, 48, of 
Quincy and Cape Cod, 
owner of a hair styling 
business, was celebrated 
Tuesday at Sacred Heart 
Church. 



He is survived by a son, 
Donald J. Tompkins of 
Florida; two brothers, 
Michael J. Tompkins of 
Hingham and Paul J. 
Tompkins of Randolph; 
three sisters, Margaret 



Mr. Tompkins died July Tompkins of New York 
17 at South Shore Hospital Olive "Marie" Morin and 



in Weymouth. 

He was the owner of 
Peter Tompkins Hair 
Deezines in Quincy for 25 
years. 

Mc. Tompkins spent 
many years living and 
working on Cape Cod 
before moving his business 



Agnes Proude, both of 
Quincy, and many nieces 
and nephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart 



Lillian Barry, 79 



to Quincy several years 

ago. He enjoyed the ocean Association, 20 Speen St., 

and dancing. Framingham 01701 



A funeral Mass for Lil- 
lian (Murray) Barry, 79, of 
Quincy, a homemaker, was 
celebrated Monday at Sa- 
cred Heart Church. 

Mrs. Barry died July 16 
at Quincy Hospital. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
22 years in Quincy. 

Wife of the late John P. 
Barry, she is survived by 
three daughters, Marianne 
C. Barry and Jacqueline A. 



Barry, both of Quincy, and 
Judith I. Marston of Taun- 
ton; a sister, Isabel Avila of 
Norwood; two nieces and a 
nephew. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 








by Tony Centorino, Kevin McGroarty and Bill Starkie 



RIGID THINKING 

One of the claims car makers the veNde. 
often make about their products in- Doni neglect your car whether it 
volves improvements in torsk>nal is owned or leased. It represents a 
rigidity." This term refers to the sizable investnwnt. LEO & WALTS 
automobile's ability to resist twisting SUNOCO invites your inquiries 
forces. In addition, designers pay about most anything connected to 
great attention to 'bending rigkJity' the care of your car. Our ASE Certi- 
and 'resonant frequency' (which re- fied technkaans are highly skilled so 
fers to vibration). Why shouM these they can do everytf«ng necessary to 
seemingly arcane elements be im- keep your car in exoelient running 
poftant to car buyers? In order to conditkxiwhetherthat means some- 
avokj the squeaks and rattles that thing simple to complex engine work, 
consumers associate with poor- We're at 258 Quincy Ave.. E. 
quality vehkdes, car makers must Braintree (781-843-1550) Hours: 
produce products with good overall Mon-Fri 6anv9pm, Sat. 7am-9pm, 
rigklity and natural frequencies (vi- SunSanvSpm.'APIaceWhereYour 
bratkMis) that do not overlap among Car Can Live Longer.' 
the vehicle's many subsystems. HINT: Computer-akled design 
When these factors are taken into (CAO) has enabled car manufadur- 
proper accourrt, consumers realize drs to greatly improve their abWty to 
the benefit in the form of a 'cao/ed pinpoint areas of weakness and fix 
fromgranile'feelingwhentheydrive them. 

tfOMi Of me ABK PitoPMe 

(Division of Leo & Walfs Sunoco) 

BOTTLES RLLED BY THE POUND 

Ho flat rate, you get wtiat ^ou pay fori 







a 




Quincy Pound 



1.I 



• • t 



Zack: Blacit I jh-mii male, very sweet and vocal, loves to 
talk. Owner died and dog was abandoned. 

Shana: Rottweiler, female, 2 years, black & tan, extremely 
friendly, good for strong owner. « 

pi«rlrf>; lUlyiin «^||yph«>rrt.miK male, 8'^ moHths, Small 
longhaired, black with some white. Was abused but has come 
around incredibly. 

Big Lou, neutered male, 2 years, all black with shiny coat, 
big gentle boy, loves other cats and people. 

Lvndsev. spayed female, 1 '^ years, sister of Big Lou, black 
and white, loves her belly rubbed, purrs like the dickens, very 
gentle. 

Doily, spayed female, 2 years, orange and white. Purrs like 
an engine, loves attention, name fits her well, an absolute 
doll. 

Sara, female, 1 year, all black, longhaired, absolutely gor- 
geous, loves to rub her head against you, definitely a people 
cat. 

£aait, spayed female, 1 year calico and tiger, very shy but 
loves to be petted, adores other cats. 

Dale, neutered male, orange and white, big strong boy, [ 
always looking for affection. 

ManvKitteM. FIV &. FLV tested. 



CoBtacI Oflk#tWHiiki Onboy a^ Bract INMh, 

376-1364 
IMfy HMiti %'M SM - 3:39 pa daily. 0emi 9m^y* 
RMiBta^ HeWK tt30 • 9i39 Ml Md 3i3t • 4}M pn. 
A^ptfM HMirfi ^^FVI fim • S:Mhi Md ttStim * 
Sj^B. &rtwday ^M « 4:3^n* PleMt iA tat CfefMc 
fnmt Th$ SmoA Slum Hunmi$ Sq€^ 



attm 



HH 



ilMBM^HMi 



Page 24 TIm Quiiuiy Sun Thunday, Jaly 22, 1999 





1554 Hancock St., Quincy Ceirter 
770ezn Fax:7709272 
^eakfast Served 6am-llam 
Homemade Soups. Salads & Desserts 
(3ourmet Coffees 
Delicious Ice Oeam & Frozen Yogurts 
CATERING AVAILAK£ 
HOURS: Monday-Friday 6am-4pm 






0\ 



LUNCH DINNER 

Tiiefda)r • Friday Timday - Sunday 

Entrees $6.95 - $9.95 Eurfy Dinner Specials $9.9S • $ 1 2.95 

' * • stma Btmsrrm - 2.00 

Fumiim f^dtitim Aaiommodating 20- :^XIk^^. , 

WeJdinys • Rehearsal • Dinners • SiKial Gatherings 
• Bridal Showers • EnaagementParties 



To 





SHIRETOWN FORD 

147 Samoset St/Rt 44 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

QualEtfCatie 

1-800-64^9246 
(508) 746-3400 


Sfm \: 




VINNY SCAHNICi 

Pa/fs, Servwe, 


^^^^(y<^j^ ^^^1 


Body Shop Director 


■ 



f- 



KING CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

lAbdulor 

Zahn 
6 Pbd 
12 Textbook 

chflpm 
13Micro- 

soopicview 
14 He may 

have a 

brash with 

greatnesf 
ISMkhael 

Bolton, 

for one 
16aiiiiese 

money 
17 Bridge 

positian 
19 Sort 
20Act»ts 

Ten 
22Sibliiig. 

for short 
24 AMA folks 
27aaik'i 

oo-worker 
29SgtSDork- 

d'sdog 
32 Plain 

dealing 

35 Smile 
bioadly 

36 One of 
the Three 



star 
38 Difficulty 
400em|Mey's 

milieu 
42 3UgaL 
44*^116 

seitmg 
46 Curved 

molding 
SO Songstress 

Kazan 
52 Aft 

54 Quite 
decorated 

55 Hinder 
piogress 

56 Entreated 

57 Century 
oonmonent 

Dovm 

1 Indiana dty 

2 Nick's 
pooch 

3 Busy with 
4>L6boe 

5 Waiting 



37mie 



6Sinclair 
Lewis' -_ 
'nmberiane" 

7Leivesout 

8 Jockey 
'nirootte 

9Haveaa 
efiiBGt 

10 Fbst victim 

11 Escapade 

12 Set down 



ISNdfth 

Dakota 

Indiao 
21 Heidi's 

height? 
23Qiaiged 

bit 
24UniuIy 

group 
25P^iMe 
26 Stocky bird 
28CoUegeof 

cardinals? 

30 literary 
monogram 

31 She-bear 
(So.) 

33 Dallas sch. 

34ABobbsey 
twin 

39 Nigfaldid) 

41 Must, 
informally 

42VUlainina 
McQueen 
flick 

43Disdose 

45 Clarinet- 
ist's need 

4/ nrapuBT' 
nalia 

48 Drops die 
baU 

49 Remnant 
SlKvelch 

constantly 
S3 Bishopric , 



TRIVIA TE/"T 

by Aaron E. Tucker 




AMI*Wn/ TO CROiyWORD 



nnnnn Ennrann 

Hnanea nnoonH 

turn] oanu una 

^Gnnnn CEin 

nm ncna nann 
txBTnnua arajnoH 

[m n nnan 

nsni nnmi cinnn 
nnrxMin gnnnnn 

unrrE^n □uoian 



l.WbohadAbitpirtMt 
medunic 00 the efiiKMle of 
The Mary lykr Moore 
Show" whea Mary por- 
rhurii a new ooovenible? 

2. Who WM the youagett 
pRskknt to he iouiguraied? 

3. Who WM the youngett 
presideat to be elected? 

4. What wu comic Lov 
Couello's (of Ahbott and 
Coatello) bifth name? 

5. Who became the moth- 
er of the Ovil Rights move- 
meot when the reftiaed to 
give her teat to a white maa 
on a bos ia Moatgomenr. 
Ala., on December 1. 19SS7 

6. According to popular 
legend, whea waa the fint 



ice cream coae MTved? 

7. What funow Haona- 
Baibera cartoon character 
spends his days swiping 
picnic baskets? 

8. On die ApoUo 1 1 moon 
mission, wlio wu the astro- 
Mut who remained m die 
command modole instead of 
actually walking oa the 
moon? 



TRIVIA AN/WERf 



roilPO 
pnfsiin g *J»ag iSoA L 

1 :nosi3N 1 «!WD 1 



Your Horoscope 

Natasha 




itiwNsapiiNBiin'S 
J > -pappi uoaa ■■II PB t Tua 



CRITICY CORHER 



INSTINCn If you ask 
aw, yoB can't ndu when 
•edag a movie staniag the 
inimitable Sir Aathoay 
HopUoa. And. while this 
fUck is a bit weak on plot- 
iine, die actor dehven the 
goods anyway. 

HapUas stm as Edian 
Powell, whom we flist meet 
M a padeat in a neatal 
iaititntioB. Ia Us fonier 
life. Powell was SB aumal 
behaviorist who once lived 
for two yean widi a ftoily 
of Afticaa primates. 
Ancated for die nmrdcr of 
two paifc faagen in 
Rwanda, he htt been 
sUpped off to a Florida 
prison for the criminally 



Coha Goodini, Jr. por- 

ttiys Theo QnUer. a 
young, idealistic psycUa- 
tiist who is d ete rmjnnd to 
ciack Powell's likacc so 
dMt it can finally be deier- 
miaed what eucdy hap- 
pcaed in that Afiican Jan- 
gte. Meatoriag Caalder is 
Dr. Ben Wllani (DaMld 
Sulhcrtaad). 

hi a series of flashbacks 
ehdled from CauUer's ses- 
rions widi PoweO, we see 
(he aaioial behavioite's life 
widi his betoved gorillas. 
And. we finally lean what 
triggend Powell to nw n de f 
dwae two path langeis, 
•t 



ofaanpriaetti 
at diat point in die movie. 
Lqwied faMDdas are m 
revolving 





ARIES (Much 21 lo 
April 19) In business, only 
meet with the associates 
you know best, for their 
questions are most i^e- 
dictable. If many answers 
come to mind, choose die 
first one - it's as safe a 
guess as any. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) There is much to 
be learned from the people 
around you, whether they 
are near to your heart <v fiff 
removed. Vou need new 
ideas and fresh viewpoints 
right now. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) Keep your own 
counsd and do not initiate 
any projects for the time 
being. Examme your moti- 
vations closely, as they may 
be questioned by otfaos. 

CANCER (June 21 July 
22) Think in tenns of^we** 
instead of "^r Now is the 
time when teamwoiii: and 
cooperation coukl take you 
to die next level. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) You feel drained of 
energy and willpower. Be 
cautious of potential manip- 
ulators trying to get didr 
way with you. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Life looks as 
bright as a technicolor 
ha^y ending. Eveiywbere 
you kwk, someone wants to 
give you a hug or a pat on 
die back. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Survey your 
surroundings ' carefully 
before making any adjust- 
ments. When redecorating, 
remember that the most 
subtle touches often are the 
most enjoyable. 

SCORnO (October 23 
to November 21) You are so 
cordial and congenial, you 
even surprise yourself. It's 
so obvious that you have an 
inside track; people find it 
pointless to argue. 



SA 

(November 22 to December 
21) Take yomself on a little 
retreat from the pressures of 
day-to-day life. However, 
this retreat shonkl include 
more education dum recre- 
ation. 

CAPRICORN 
(December 22 to January 
19) Get out on die catwalk 
and show *em whait you've 
got The cameras are click- 
ing and the l ep mtes are 
rudy - not to mention die 
fuchib. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 18) A tidal 
wave of emotion nuiy 
vuccp through your mind, 
leaving yoa soaked and 
bewildered. Get to the high- 
lands as fut as you can. 

PISCES (F^niary 19 to 
March 20) Love and 
romance malce it impossible 
for you to think about busi- 
ness matters. TUce a few 
deep breadis and let your 
head clear. 

YOU BORN THIS 
WEEK: PteuUarities and 
puzzles delight you, and 
there are few mysteries dot 
you will not try to solve. 
Yon undentand diat die uni- 
verse hokls much more dian 
we can comprehend at diis 
time, but diat knowledge 
only encourages yon to 
invent new things and 
explore new places. 

e 199t iai« i^atoBs Syad.. ke. 



lUsoae'smtadRdneto 
Ms viokace. Kaap dto Ud- 




For home subscription, 

please call 

(617) 471-3100 



Hmnday, Joly 22, 1999 Tift* Quliftoy Sua Page 25 



Adams Inn Receives 
Best Western Award 



Meet The New Saturn L-Senes Sedan 



The Best Western 
Adams Inn in Quincy has 
received the Best Western 
Director's Award for 
outstanding quality 
standards. 

The Director's Award 
recognizes Best Western 
International hotels with a 
cleanliness and 

maintenance inspection 
score of 950 points or more 
out of a possible 1,000. 
Hotels must also meet 
Best Western's 

requirements for design 
and high customer service 
scores to qualify for the 
distinction. 

"The Director's Award 
is an important symbol of 
success. This award 
conHrms the Best Western 
Adams Inn's Commitment 
to providing quality 
accommodations for our 
guests. Our housekeeping 
and maintenance 

departments have worked 
hard to achieve this level 
of excellence. For this we 
thank you," says Innkeeper 
Bob Galligan. 

While thanking the 
members of his staff at a 
reception the Innkeeper 
also read a leter from 
Dave L. Huff SR., CHA 



the District Director of 
Best Western International 
which accompanied the 
Award. 

• "Congratulations again 
to you and your staff. This 
is the third successive 
Director's Award the 
Adams Inn has received. 
You continue to set 
standards by which the rest 
of us are measured. I'm 
delighted to recognize you 
again with the Best 
Western Director's Award 
for superior achievement 
in Quality Assurance. 

Earning high scores in 
Best Western's Quality 
Assurance programs is no 
easy accomplishment. To 
maintain consitently high 
standards, however, is an 
even grater challenge. You 
and your staff continue to 
display the award as a 
symbol of your 
accomplishments and the 
esteem in which you hare 
held by Best Western 
hoteliers. Please share 
with them my warmest 
congratulations and the 
thanks of the entire Board 
of Director's and 
membership." 

Located at 29 Hancock 



Street, the Best Western 
Adams Inn features 99 
well appointed rooms 
along with meeting and 
function space. The Adams 
Pub offers a limited fare 
all year round while the 
Waterside Cafe Features 
burgers and grilled items, 
on the Neponset River. 
The newest facility is 
Steamer's at the Gazebo 
over the Neponset River 
featuring Clambakes, 
Weddings or seasonal 
functions from 25 to 300 
people. 

For reservations at the 
Best Western Adams Inn, 
call 1-617-328-1500 o? call 
Best Western's 24-hour, 
toll-free reservation 
number (800) 528-1234. 
Reservations are also 
available from Best 
Western's International 
website at 

www.bestwestem.com. 

Best Western 

International, Inc. is a non- 
profit membership 
association of 

independently owned and 
operated hotels. It is the 
largest lodging brand jn 
the world. 




THE NEW SATURN I^Scries sedan makes its debut at Saturn of Quincy, 54 Miller St, 
West Quincy. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble) 



Board Places Taxi 
Complaints On File 



Complaints from Kevin 
V. Cook, Quincy Police 
Hackney Officer against 
the Marina Bay Taxi, Inc, 
were placed on file 
Tuesday by the License 
Board. 

Cook, who had 
inspected the cabs at their 
site in Braintree, and 
found some of them in 
disarray, told the board all 
he wanted was "clean- 
liness and more 
cooperation". 

Cook told the board that 
on a recent inspection on 
the cabs he cited a "lack 
of cooperation" and was 
later told to leave the 
premises. He complained 
about that and said "I did 
not enjoy them asking me 
to leave" and added "I left 
in a gentlemanly manner." 

Cook said several of the 
cabs did not have air 
conditioniong and the 
company was given nearly 
two months to have them 
installed. But, he said 
when he went back two 
months later in June, it 
had not been done as yet. 

Citing many bald tires, 
back to when Marina Bay 



Tax was located on 
Sumner St., Cook said he 
got "tired of waiting for the 
tires to be replaced" while 
he waited as the cab 
company knew he would 
be inspecting at a certain 
day. 

Cook said with Quincy 
promoting tourism, the 
company should be a 
"little more intent on 
keeping the cabs they way 
they should" 

Atty. Robert Fleming 
told the board he thought 
the company was "making 
progress" and said as of 

June, all the cabs were 
given stickers and all 
passed inspection. He said 
cabs run 24 hours a day, 
and sometimes "do get 
dirty". 

Police Chief T Thomas 
Frane lauded Cook' for 
"doing a good job" with 
the cabs as well as his 
position as a traffic officer. 
He said he hoped the level 
of communication would 
improve and said part of 
the problem is that the 
Marina Bay Taxi is 
located in Braintree when 
the license is issued in 



Quincy. 

Chairman Joseph Shea 
said Abdellati Nannaa, 
owner of the cab company 
calls him constantly 
asking him about 
relocating in Quincy. Shea 
said he doesn't want the 
problems repeated from 
the ones the cab company 
had on Sumner St. and is 
looking for a location that 
is not residential 

Shea said he would 
seek the advise of the law 
department, and then re- 
issue rules and regulations 
to all three cab companies 
in Quincy. 

Shea questioned the 
citizenship law whether or 
not a driver had to be bom 
in the United States; if a 
driver had to obtain a 
green card; or if they had 
to live in the City of 
Quincy. 




CATHY CHASE TAKES the wiiecl ofa new Satarn L-Scrics sedan at Saturn of Quincy, 54 
Miller St, West Quincy, as sales consultant Joey Gincs fllb her in on its features. 



Beauty Academy 
Razed For New Bank 



The; former Quincy 
Beauty Academy, a 118- 
year-old three-story building 
on Franklin Street, opposite 
Delaney's Pub, was razed 
Monday to make way for a 
new branch of the South 
Shore Cooperative Bank. 

The bank, founded in 
1890, is headquartered in 

Weymouth at 195 Wash- 
ington St. The bank is ex- 
pected to open early next 
year. 



Said John J. O'Brien Jr., 
president and CEO of South 
Shore Cooperative, the new 
branch will include an ATM 
and a drive-through. 

"Our bank is growing," 
O'Brien said earlier this 
winter when the bank first 



applied for permission to 
build the new one-story 
building. Since then, it has 
received permission from 
the state Banking Commis- 
sion to acquire the East 
Bridgewater Co-operative 
Bank. 



Sylvana Todesca Receives Degree 



Sylvana Todesca, 
daughter of Antonio and 
Lauretta Todesca of 
Quincy, graduated from St. 
Michael's College located 



in Colchester, Vt. with a 
bachelor's degree in 
political science. 

She is also a graduate 
of Fontbonne Academy. 




Early Police Retirements 

(Cont 'd from page 1) up the costs, 
positions. Frane said he has 

been budgeting those job "We had intended to ex- 
slots into his operating pand because of community 
budget so that the impact of policing, and it makes sense 
the cost won't be drastic to take advantage [of this 
when the city begins to pick grant]," he said. 



AUGUST 11, 1999 @ 10:30 A.M. 
AUGUST 11. 1999 ® 10:45 A.M. 
AUGUST 11, 1999 ® 11:00 A.M. 
AUGUST 11, 1999 @ 11:15 A.M. 
AUGUST 11, 1999 @ 11 :30 A.M. 



Quit *^H 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 


Smoking. 


American Heart f« 
Assodatioiw^^ 



IWVITATION TO BID 

CrrV OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
1305 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY. MA 02169 
Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of Quincy: 
FOOD SERVICE FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT 

SCHOOL DEPT. MEDICAL SUPPUES 

SCHOOL DEPT. MUSIC SUPPUES 

SCHOOL DEPT. SHEET MUSIC 

QUINCY COLLEGE PAINTING OF SAVILLE HALL 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent. Quincy City Hall, 1305 HarKock Street. Quincy. 
Massachusetts, 02169. between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. 

Bids must state excefrtions.if any. the delivery date and any aHowable discounts. Bids/Proposals must be in a sealed 
envetope (which ie supplied). The outside of the sealed envetope is to be dearly marked "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date 

of bid call. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration. Bids/Proposals will be received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until 
the time and date stated above, at which time and date they wiH be publidy opened and read. Late Bids/Proposals, delivered 

by mail or in person, will be rejected. 

If applicabie, Bids shall be in accordance with Chapter 149 of the M.G.L as amended. M.G.L. Chapter 39. section 39A. 
39B and 39F-R. M.G.L Chapter 149. Section 26, 27. 29, 35 and 44A-44M. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept anypartofabidortheone deemed best for the City, and waive 
any informalities in the bidding, if it is in the be^ interest of the City to do so. 

James A Sheets. MAYOR 
Aifrsd J. Qrazioso. Jr.. PURCHASING AGENT 

7/22/90 



aHBOHi^ 



Page 26 Til* Quiaosr Sua Thunday, Joly 22, 1999 



J [ 



L£QAI.NOTlCe 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1709GI 
Notic* Of Guardianship 
Notice 

To Anna M. Bradley, The 
Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health and to all 
persons interested in estate 
of Anna M. Bradley of 
Quincy, in the county of 
Norfolk. 

A petition has been 
presented in the above 
captioned matter praying 
that Bernadette J. Smith of 
Quincy in the county of 
Norfolk and Daniel B, 
Bradley of Hanover, MA in 
the county of Plymouth be 
appointed guardians of 
mentally ill person with 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before August 
4, 1999. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this 13th day of 
July, 1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/22/99 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

'bocket 88P0438T2 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Thomas J. 
Fantasia, late of Quincy, in 
the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the fourth 
account(s) J. Michael 
Roberts as Trustee (the 
fiduciary) has been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the twenty-fifth day of 
August, 1999, the return day 
of this citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this 13th day of 
July, 1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/22/99 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1707AD 
Estate of GERALD LUKE 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that MARY P. LUKE of 
CAMBRIDGE In the County 
of MIDDLESEX be 
appointed to administrator of 
said estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 8/ 
25/1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 7/1 3/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/22/99 



I LEQAt.w<mci I ^iimyipncE ^ 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1689EP 

Estate of SAMUEL M. 

TUTTLE 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JOSEPH A. 
MACRITCHIE of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
and LINDAA. CAMPBELL of 
HANSON In the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executor, named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 18, 1999. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
Rule 16A. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 7/9/1999. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/22/99 




Street Light. 
37i5^i490 




COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk DiviskKi 

Docket 88P2409AO 

Estate of EDITH R. 

STAKER 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that WILLIAM H. 
MURPHY of MILTON In the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed administrator of 
said estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 8/ 
25/1999. 

In addition you shoukj file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the Court, 
on motion with notice to the 
petitioner, may allow) in 
accordance with Probate 
RulelGA. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this day, 7/1 2/1 999. 

THOMAS PATRK;K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF Pm)BATE 

7/22/99 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1630EP 

Estate of ELVI M.TITUS 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that BARBARA 
LOUISE THOMPSON of 
POMPANO BEACH In the 
State of FLORIDA be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attorney 
must file a writ